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North Carolina State Library 
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STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 



TWENTY-FOURTH REPORT 



OF THE 



CORPORATION COMMISSION 



FOR THE 

BIENNIAL PERIOD, 1927-1928 



COMPILATIONS FROM RAILROAD RETURNS ARE FOR 
YEARS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1925 AND 1926 






>* 






STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

CORPORATION COMMISSION 



W. T. LEE, Chairman 
GEORGE P. PELL 
A. J. MAXWELL 

Commissioners 



R. O. Self, Clerk Mary Shaw, Stenographer 

Elsie G. Riddick, Assistant Cleric Margaret Sherrill, Stenographer 

Rebecca Merritt. Reporter Edgar Womble, Statistician 



RATE DEPARTMENT 

W. G. Womble, Rate Clerk 

N. B. Correll, Assistant Rate Clerk 

Frances T. Abernethy, Stenographer 



BANKING DEPARTMENT 

John Mitchell, Chief State Bank' Examiner 

State Bank Examiners 

W. L. Williams D. M. Darden 

I,. H. Harrison 

Assistant State Bank Examiners 

John A. Campbell, Jr. B. R. Roberts 

J. B. Carson W. M. Wiggins 

C. C. Meroney 

Mabel Morris, Assistant Bank Clerk 

Bessie Folk, Stenographer 

Mrs. H. P. Hoyle, Stenographer 

CAPITAL ISSUES DEPARTMENT 

I. M. Bailey, Assistant Commissioner and Legal Advisor 
Sophia P. Busbee. Stenographer 
B. B. Lumsden, Accountant 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 

Raleigh, N. C, December 20, 1928. 

To His Excellency, A. W. McLean, 

Governor of North Carolina. 

Sir: — As required by Section 1065, Chapter 21, Consolidated 
Statutes, the Corporation Commission has the honor to report for 
the biennial period 1927-1928. 

The period covered by this report has been one of increased ac- 
tivity in all divisions of this department and serves to emphasize the 
growing demands the public is making upon this branch of the State 
government. The business and industrial interests of the State were 
never more alert to the advantages to be derived from intelligent 
analysis, cooperation and united effort to protect their interests 
and further expansion of operation. This is shown in the number 
of active shippers associations in various sections of the State and 
in the employment of traffic experts by a number of the larger 
business concerns. The Commission has had the cooperation of 
these organizations in prosecuting the State's interests and also in 
determining purely intrastate affairs. The Commission takes pleas- 
ure in acknowledging the valuable service rendered by these agen- 
cies. Each year the business conditions of the State are becoming 
more complex and the Commission is advertent to the fact that 
expansion of its efforts and the adoption of the most modern meth- 
ods are absolutely essential if the department is to fill the place 
for which it was created. 

The people of North Carolina continue to feel the necessity for 
meeting sharp competition which exists not only between them- 
selves within the State, but between commercial and industrial in- 
terests of other states. In this competition there is perhaps no 
more important factor than that of freight rates. This situation 
is strikingly reflected in the activities of the Rate Department. 
It is gratifying to report that in the several important cases de- 
cided, in which this Commission participated, the people of the 
State will profit greatly. More important, however, than the cases 
which have been decided are those which are now pending, some 
of which are before this body and others before the Federal Com- 
mission. For this purpose, additional office force has been abso- 
lutely necessary and the Governor and Council of State have met 

(3) 



4 N. C. Corporation Commission 

the emergency liberally. The Commission is putting forth every 
effort to see that the interests of the people of the state are fully 
protected. 

Consolidations for promoting better motor bus service have been 
effected. Motor freight and express service is rapidly developing 
and is presenting problems of rates and service which can be solved 
only by careful study and experimental operation. 

Because of the growth of the State's wealth, there probably 
never was a time in the history of the State when the investment 
salesman was so conspicuous and the need for protection against 
worthless "securities" so imperative. The activities of the Capital 
Issues Department has beyond question prevented the people of 
the State from losing much and has demonstrated the wisdom of 
the Legislature in enacting it. There is a constantly increasing 
demand on the services of this department. 

The Banking Department has had its share of special demands. 
There are fewer banks, due to consolidations, but an increase in 
assets since former report. Liquidation of defunct banks has been 
added to the duties of this department with satisfactory results. 

The reports of public utilities, which are an index to business and 
industrial conditions in the State, show a gratifying expansion. 

The Transportation Advisory Commission, created by the last 
General Assembly, has been working in conjunction with this Com- 
mission. Its preliminary study presents an array of data and 
suggestions which, in the opinion of this Commission, should prove 
of great value in solving the transportation problems of the State. 

Kail ways 

In railway affairs the only attempt at expansion during the 
period of this report, was the effort of the Piedmont and Northern 
Kailway Company to extend its lines from Charlotte to Winston- 
Salem and Durham and the coupling up of its links in South Caro- 
lina. Permission to do this was denied by the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. The company appealed to the Federal court where 
the matter is now pending. It appears that both sides are deter- 
mined to fight the matter until it is passed upon by the highest 
tribunal in the land. This Commission, representing Your Excel- 
lency and the shipping interests of the State, actively participated 
in the hearing held at Washington and presented argument in 
favor of the extension. 

Strenuous opposition to the order of this Commission for a new 
union station at Kaleigh is being maintained by the carriers af- 



Letter of Transmittal 5 

fected. Upon the application of the Raleigh Chamber of Commerce, 
this Commission after hearing issued its order. The carriers im- 
mediately appealed to the Superior Court. The trial, in Wake 
County Superior Court, was brought to a close when a technical 
point was raised by the respondents that the North Carolina Rail- 
road should be made a party to the case. Appeal was taken to the 
Supreme Court, which resulted in that body sustaining the posi- 
tion of the Commission. The case will now proceed on its merits 
and the Commission is hopeful of a satisfactory conclusion. 

From data furnished by the railroad companies in their annual 
reports, it is observed that, especially with reference to operation 
in the State generally, they are in a healthy condition. With 
the exception of the twelve-mile piece of road of the Louisville & 
Nashville Railroad and several of the short lines, which for the 
most part have never been paying properties though accorded 
higher rates, the carriers show a profit. 

The decrease in passenger revenue on practically all lines is 
very noticeable compared with former years. In the matter of 
freight revenue, however, the carriers are holding their own and 
this, too, in the face of motor express and freight service which 
has grown considerably during the past two years. The total 
amount of revenue received for this class of traffic for 1925 was 
167,673,701, for 1927 it was f 68,300,640.16. Passenger train rev- 
enue for 1925 was f 17,859,385.41 ; for 1927, f 14,846,475.57. Oper- 
ating revenue, all lines, for 1925 was $87,358,895.54; operating ex- 
penses, 161,579,256.72; net operating revenue, $25,779,638.82. For 
1927 the operating revenue was $84,656,257.67; operating expenses, 
$61,304,109.16; net operating revenue, $23,352,148.51. The cost of 
road and equipment, allocated on a mileage basis in the case of 
interstate lines, are shown as follows: 1925, $286,084,912.39; 1927, 
$300,516,673.07. The funded debt, arrived at in the same manner, 
was as follows : 1925, $161,477,231.89 ; 1927, $165,916,436.37. Capital 
stock : 1925, $106,753,618.65 ; 1927, $110,060,890.86. 

The physical property, as a whole, of the carriers is in excellent 
shape. A considerable sum has been spent for this purpose. It is 
noted that while the capital stock and the funded debt of the car- 
riers increased only $7,746,476.69, the value of their roads and 
equipment increased $14,431,660.68. 

Freight Rates 

Freight rate cases of an epochal character, an aftermath of the 
Southeastern Rate Adjustment, known as I. C. C. Docket No. 



6 N. C. Corporation Commission 

13494, affecting North Carolina interests are now pending before 
this and the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

North Carolina Intrastate Class Rates: Chief of these cases is 
the petition of the carriers operating in this State for permis- 
sion to increase the North Carolina intrastate class rates to the 
level of the interstate class rates put into effect by the carriers 
January 15, 1928, rates on a scale prescribed by the Interstate 
Commerce Commission in Docket No. 13494, applicable not only to 
North Carolina but on traffic in all states of the southeast with the 
exception of Florida. 

North Carolina Exception Sheet: At the same time the carriers 
petitioned for an upward revision of the North Carolina intrastate 
class rates, they requested this Commission to cancel the North 
Carolina Exception Sheet, which, in a large number of cases, pro- 
vides lower ratings on commodities than similar commodities are 
rated in Southern Classification, which would have the still further 
effect of raising rates in North Carolina. For those not familiar 
with railroad practice, it may be said that the preponderance of 
freight traffic moves on what are known as commodity rates and 
that the North Carolina Exception Sheet was designed for the 
purpose of putting into effect such rates without the issuance of 
specific tariffs relating to each item. This is a general practice 
throughout the country. As these petitions are of vital import- 
ance to the shipping interests of the State, all interested parties 
will be given an opportunity to be heard before decision is reached. 

Southern Classification: Another case in line with the above, re- 
lating closely thereto, is the action of the carriers in making a 
wholesale revision of Southern Classification, without due hear- 
ings, which, by indirection, would increase rates. However, these 
tariffs which were filed with the Interstate Commerce Commission 
have not become effective as they were suspended by that body upon 
the request of this Commission and other interested parties. In 
these matters the carriers are emphasizing the point that there 
should be uniformity in intra and interstate rates, but in 
considering rate matters it must be borne in mind that apparent 
uniformity is by no means actual uniformity. 

Rates between Virginia and North Carolina: Another case of 
vast importance is the complaint of the Virginia Corporation Com- 
mission before the Interstate Commerce Commission for a rate 
revision on traffic between Virginia cities and point in North Caro- 
lina, which, if granted, would be more favorable than at present to 
Virginia jobbing centers and correspondingly detrimental to North 



i 



Letter of Transmittal 7 

Carolina distributors. In former report this Commission referred 
to a similar case before the Interstate Commerce Commission. In 
this case this Commission assumed the position at the hearing in 
Kichmond, Virginia, May, 1925, that inasmuch as the Virginia 
Commission's complaint did not cover the group rates along with 
the alternative scale complained of, the complaint was not compre- 
hensive enough to enable the Interstate Commerce Commission to 
render an intelligent decision. The Commission, in its decision, 
took this view and asked the Virginia Commission to amend its 
complaint. This was done and the complaint, now broader in scope, 
is before the Federal body. The Corporation Commission is pre- 
paring its case to meet the issues involved and in this it is receiv- 
ing the active cooperation of the State's shipping associations and 
others whose interests are involved. 

Cases not so significant from a general standpoint as those re- 
ferred to above but of importance to certain shipping interests of 
the State are also pending with indication of favorable outcome 
to North Carolina interests. 

Strawberry Rates: In the case of the transportation of straw- 
berries, in carload lots, from Florida, Georgia, Alabama, North 
Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia to points in official classi- 
fication territory the principle was involved as to whether or not 
the present freight service on strawberries and dewberries from 
the states mentioned was adequate or whether or not these states 
were entitled to express refrigeration service that is now accorded 
the berry shippers in the State of Louisiana. This Commission 
actively participated in this case and the examiner recommends 
that the carriers be required to furnish the express refrigeration 
service requested. 

Vegetable Rates: A number of complaints against rates on vege- 
tables from the Carolina s to points in Trunk Line and Central 
Freight Association territories were consolidated and heard by the 
Interstate Commerce Commission. . This Commission actively 
participated in the cases and a report made by the examiner was 
favorable to North Carolina growers and shippers of vegetables. 
However, upon petition of the carriers the case was re-opened and 
further testimony taken. A new report by the examiner is ex- 
pected within a short time. 

Cotton Rates: A general investigation of cotton rates is now 
under way. It is being handled under the cooperation plan and a 
member of this Commission is sitting with members of the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission. 



8 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Cottonseed and Related Articles: A general investigation of the 
rates on cottonseed and its products and related articles is also 
being made. A representative of this Commission is sitting with 
the Interstate Commerce Commission's examiners in this hearing. 

Another case which ranks high in importance is the complaint 
filed by this Commission with the Interstate Commerce Commission 
upon the recommendation of the Transportation Advisory Com- 
mission, created by the last General Assembly, against all railway 
lines operating in North Carolina and in official classification ter- 
ritory, which attacks the relationship of class rates between points 
in North Carolina and points in New England, Trunk Line and 
Central Western Territory with rates between points in Virginia 
and the same territories. Complaint is made of the arbitrary di- 
vision of Virginia as between Trunk Line and Southern Territory 
and of the maintenance of different classifications and ratings as 
between said territories to the disadvantage of North Carolina. 
This Commission also calls attention to the "hybrid freight classifi- 
cation," different from both official and southern classifications, 
which is maintained in Virginia and likewise that the class rates 
applicable within the State of Virginia are much lower than those 
applicable to interstate transportation between North Carolina 
and Virginia, thus causing undue prejudice to North Carolina and 
an undue burden on interstate commerce. This Commission asks 
for removal of discriminations complained of by the requirement 
of uniform methods of tariff publication. The relief, if granted, 
would, in the opinion of this Commission, greatly benefit the in- 
dustries of the State and have the effect of bringing other indus- 
tries to North Carolina and at the same time benefiting shippers 
of the State generally. 

In the interest of what we conceive to be the best interest of the 
shipping public — transportation economy — and, above all, fairness, 
we are opposing before the Interstate Commerce Commission the 
petition of the carriers for fourth section relief to enable the car- 
riers to maintain higher rates for shorter distances over same route. 
As a typical illustration, the carriers desire authority to maintain 
a lower rate from Cincinnati to Danville, Virginia, then to Greens- 
boro, North Carolina, on traffic to Danville passing through Greens- 
boro. This Commission contends that the carriers should be com- 
pelled to observe the Danville rate at points to which the distance 
does not exceed the distance to Danville via the short route. This 
is termed in the Interstate Commerce Act the equi-distant rule. 
This Commission participated in the hearings held at Atlanta, Ga., 



Letter of Transmittal 9 

and Washington, D. C, and submitted comprehensive testimony 
and exhibits. 

The North Carolina intrastate rates on clay products are under 
attack in a complaint before the Interstate Commerce Commission, 
brought by the W. S. Dickey Manufacturing Company against 
the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, et al. Your Com- 
mission has become a party to the action and has presented a 
defense of these intrastate rates. In this connection it is deemed 
advisable to call attention to the decision of the United States 
Supreme Court in upholding the District Court of the United States 
for Eastern North Carolina, which upheld our order relative to the 
application of intrastate rates on import traffic through the Port 
of Wilmington, when such traffic originates as rail shipments at 
Wilmington. The order referred to has been the means of saving 
thousands of dollars for the shippers at Wilmington as well as to 
receivers of freight at interior points in the State. 

Southern manufacturers, including those from this State, are 
keenly interested in the case, which has been reopened, where higher 
rates were prescribed from the south to the southwest than the 
rates from official territory to the southwest for equal distances. 
In this case, it is gratifying to say that the southern carriers are 
in harmony with the shipping interests in the south in their re- 
quest for authority to maintain rates that will place southern 
manufacturers on an equal basis with their northern competitors. 

This Commission is called upon to defend the North Carolina 
intrastate rates on excelsior in the complaint filed with certain 
Virginia interests, who allege that the North Carolina rates are 
unduly preferential to North Carolina shippers and unduly pre- 
judicial to the complainants. 

Several cases have been decided by the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission which have been highly favorable to North Carolina. 

Lower Peach Rates: The Sandhill peach growers and other ship- 
pers of peaches to outside markets should be assisted greatly in 
the marketing of their product by the lower freight rates on peaches 
which became effective May 20, 1927. These lower rates resulted 
from a complaint started by Georgia peach growers. The case 
assumed a general investigation and included shipments from 
points not only in Georgia but from points in South and North 
Carolina to all points in southern and official territories. A mem- 
ber of this Commission sat with the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission during these hearings and participated in the decision. 



10 N. C. Corporation Commission 

The reduction in rates from the North Carolina district average 
about fifty dollars per car. 

Favorable Potato Rates: This Commission participated in cases 
before the Interstate Commerce Commission involving the rates on 
potatoes from North Carolina territory to Michigan and other cen- 
tral western states, disposed of under a consolidated report on Octo- 
ber 9, 1928. The issue involved covered the suspension of rates 
by the carriers. The report requires that the carriers make the 
new rates effective not later than February 20, 1929; therefore, 
the new* rates will be available for the next shipping season. These 
new rates are favorable to North Carolina potato growers. Upon 
request of the Elizabeth City Chamber of Commerce and of the 
Department of Agriculture, we stationed a representative at Eliza- 
beth City for a week during the 1928 potato shipping season for 
the purpose of furnishing freight rate quotations to growers and 
shippers. 

Lower Cement Rates: Substantial reductions in cement rates 
from all producing points to practically the entire State of North 
Carolina resulted from the decision of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission in the Southern Cement Rate Case. Members of state 
commissions in the territory involved were invited and sat with 
members of the Interstate Commerce Commission, or examiners. 
It was suggested in the report that the scale prescribed be adopted 
for intrastate application in southern states and this has been done 
in North Carolina. 

Rates on Hay, Straw, Excelsior, Etc.: A compromise decision 
resulted in the hearing before the Interstate Commerce Commission 
on the question of rates on hay, straw, excelsior and like commodi- 
ties between Illinois Freight Association, Central Freight Asso- 
ciation, Eastern and New England territories and southern points. 
The Commission decided on 9th class rating. This case resulted 
from the action of the carriers in publishing tariffs making 8th 
class applicable, being a raise from 10th class, which tariffs were 
suspended pending hearing. This Commission vigorously opposed 
the change. 

Refrigeration Charges: This Commission participated in the 
general investigation of refrigeration charges on fruit, vegetables, 
berries and melons from the south to points in official territory, 
inaugurated by the Interstate Commerce Commission on its own 
initiative. An investigation of cost factors in refrigeration service 
was made by inspectors and accountants of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission with the result that the examiner's report recommends 



Letter of Transmittal 11 

reduced charges from North Carolina. However, this Commission 
was of the opinion that the discrimination was not fully removed. 
It has filed exception to the rates and has presented argument for 
greater reductions, which we believe will be granted in the final 
decision by the Interstate Commerce Commission. It is expected 
that a favorable final order will be issued at an early date. This it 
is believed, will mean much to the berry growers of Eastern North 
Carolina, and a further reduction in charges on peach shipments. 

Hosiery Rates: As an aftermath of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission's decision in a case brought by the Bear Brand Hosiery 
Company, the carriers attempted to cancel all commodity rates on 
cotton hosiery from southern manufacturing points, leaving only 
in effect the first-class rate. The action of the carriers was pro- 
tested by a number of southern interests, including this Commis- 
sion, and the cancellation of those rates was suspended by the In- 
terstate Commerce Commission. Hearings in the case have not 
been concluded ; however, it is hoped that the Federal body can be 
convinced of the necessity of continuing the present adjustment 
from the south. 

Furniture Rates: A similar situation exists with respect to rates 
on furniture from manufacturing points in this State and other 
southern states to southwestern territory, which is now in progress 
before the Interstate Commerce Commission. In all these cases 
the Corporation Commission is giving such assistance as it can to 
shipper interests in this State in the interest of maintaining rates 
on manufactured products from points in this State on an equal 
level or on a competitive basis with rates from producing points 
in official classification territory. 

In former report, reference was made to the final decision in the 
noted Southeastern Class Kate Case, known as I. C. C. Docket No. 
13494, which had stretched over a period of several years. Another 
important chapter was written in this case when the carriers made 
effective January 15, 1928, through rates between Central Freight 
Association territory and points in the southeast, including North 
Carolina, and between all points within the southeast, which in- 
cludes North Carolina. As forecasted in former report, there are 
some sharp advances in the rates between Ohio Kiver cities and 
southeastern points, but between all points north of the Ohio River 
and Southeastern Territory the rates are less than the former 
combination rates. This is especially notable in the rates to a 
large part of North Carolina. 



12 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Commodity rates for the territory involved are now being given 
attention for the purpose of making those rates conform to the new 
class rate structure. 

A Survey of Transportation Costs. 

In the process of revising rates on manufactured commodities 
between points in the south and other rate territories, issues are 
now arising involving a proper relationship of such rates to the 
level of rates in northern and central western states, known as 
official classification territory. This issue is of the greatest im- 
portance to all North Carolina manufacturers who distribute a 
manufactured product to other rate territories. Any handicap in 
rate level, compared with competitors in official classification ter- 
ritory, can only be met by absorption in profit which the manufac- 
turer is entitled to make. The question of relationship of rates is 
also the important issue involved in complaints of Virginia in- 
terests against North Carolina rates, and in the broader complaint 
of this Commission against Virginia rates and generally against 
the level of interstate rates to and from points in North Carolina. 

The question of average rate level, and of average transportation 
costs in southern territory, as compared with official classification 
territory, is one that is in much confusion, largely on account of 
important differences in methods of constructing rates in the two 
territories, and because of different classification ratings used in the 
two territories. 

In view of the great importance of this issue, and its clouded 
condition, it seemed to us important to have an analysis of this 
situation made by a competent expert of unquestioned ability. 
Your Excellency gave us authority for the necessary expenditure 
for this purpose and we employed the Roberts-Petti John Wood 
Corporation, of Chicago, to make this survey. The matter has been 
handled personally by the president of that compeny, Mr. J. W. 
Roberts, who has had broad experience in that field of railroad 
service and who was auditor for the U. S. Railroad Administration 
during the war period. 

The conclusions reached by Mr. Roberts, in his study of relative 
costs of transportation service in the two territories, are highly 
favorable to our contentions. He has presented the results of his 
study in testimony in the furniture and hosiery cases, and it will 
be used in the Virginia-North Carolina cases, the case involving 
rates to southwestern territory, and in other cases involving this 
issue of relationship of rates. 



Letter of Transmittal 13 

Electric Power 

Electric energy, which is an outstanding factor in the industrial 
life of the State, continues to show an increase due to the opening 
of new plants and the extension of old ones. This greater volume 
is noted both in steam and hydro production, with steam leading 
as heretofore. The wider distribution of current in new territory 
is especially marked in the northeastern part of the State, where 
the Viriginia Electric and Power Company, of Richmond, Va., ac- 
quired a number of municipal plants, and in the northwestern part, 
where the Southern Public Utilities Company has acquired some 
new properties. These and other companies increased their capaci- 
ties to meet the growing needs of their respective localities. 

While there are a number of small companies operating inde- 
pendently at a number of points in the State, these produce little 
power. They are, with few exceptions, merely purchasers and dis- 
tributors of current in the immediate localities which they serve. 
Practically all of the electric power in the State is produced by the 
Carolina Power and Light Company, the Duke Power Company, 
the Tide Water Power Company and the Virginia Electric and 
Power Company. The Duke Power Company also has large plants 
in South Carolina and produces more power in that state than 
it does in North Carolina. The larger production of the Virginia 
Electric and Power Company is in Virginia. 

Plants operated by municipalities have also increased their out- 
put and many are now serving customers outside of their corporate 
limits. 

Reporting companies show that 1,087,441,126 kilowatt hours were 
produced by steam plants and 374,916,534 kilowatt hours were gen- 
erated by hydro plants. These figures, of course, do not include 
municipal plants and the kilowatt hours generated and consumed 
by privately-owned plants which produce a considerable amount 
of current. The State continues to consume more power than it 
generates. 

In the way of expansion during the past two years, the Duke 
Power Company, which acquired the Southern Power Company by 
merger, December 1, 1927, constructed transmission and distribution 
lines totaling 68.48 miles. It took over the Turner Station, on 
Green River ten miles north of Tryon, and the Tuxedo Station, on 
Green River three miles west of Saluda. The Southern Power 
Company, before being merged with the Duke Power Company, 
constructed 148.28 miles of transmission lines and acquired a 
number of additional plants in the western part of the State. 



14: N. C. Corporation Commission 

The Tide Water Power Company constructed transmission lines, 
as follows: Rose Hill to Charity Cross, Willard Test Farm to 
Town of Willard, Jackson's store to Chinquapin, Kichlands to 
Place IML Brock, and Clarkton to Abbottsburg. It built a sub- 
station at Rocky Point and sub-station and distributing system 
for the town of Tabor. 

The Virginia Electric and Power Company constructed trans- 
mission lines from Suffolk, Va., to Elizabeth City; from Boykin, 
Va., to Rich Square and adjacent territory ; between Roanoke Rap- 
ids and Tarboro. It purchased the Hart plant at Tarboro and 
secured franchises from the following towns: Hertford, Edenton, 
Severn, Conway, Woodland, Rich Square, Aulander, Kelford, Lew- 
iston, Roxobel, Woodville, Ahoskie, Whitakers, Winton, Garys- 
burg and Battleboro. 

Telephones 
Expansion and increased efficiency in service has characterized 
telephone operation in the State, as a whole, for the past two years. 
Nearly eight million dollars, according to reports, were expended 
for improvements and extension during this period. The bulk of 
this large amount was spent by the two larger companies, the 
Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company and the Carolina 
Telephone and Telegraph Company. The former expended more 
than four and one-half million dollars and the latter nearly two 
millions. The number of telephones increased from 116,206 to 
149,926, an increase of 33,720, or 28.9 per cent. The value of plants 
and equipment at the close of business December 31, 1927, as shown 
by reports, was $20,814,068.58, an increase over 1925 of more than 
35 per cent. Gross operating revenue was given at $8,292,556.01, 
which exceeded the gross operating expenses by $2,623,522.78. 

Telegraph Companies 
The Western Union Telegraph Company, during the interim of 
this report, made application for an adjustment of its rates in North 
Carolina on a zoning system basis, which it is estimated would 
have brought about a 20 per cent increase on a part of its business. 
After a hearing, an audit of the company's books both as a whole 
and intrastate, and a comprehensive study by the Commission, 
the application was denied. 

Gas Companies 
Expansion, without the addition of any new plants, is noted in 
the field of gas production. Consolidation of companies appears to 






Letter of Transmittal 15 

be the only item of special interest. Gas plants at Fayetteville, 
Goldsboro, Greenville, Kinston, New Bern and Washington, which 
had been operated by separate corporations but by the same dom- 
inating ownership, were taken over during the year 1927 by the 
Carolina Gas and Electric Company, of Kinston, controlled by the 
same interests. The plants at Elizabeth City and Henderson, oper- 
ated by the Southern Gas Improvement Company, were taken over 
by new corporations; the former by the Elizabeth Gas and Subur- 
ban Company, the latter by the Henderson and Oxford Gas Com- 
pany. The Winston Gas Company was merged with the North 
Carolina Public Service Company. Keports for the year 1927 show 
that these companies produced 1,529,000 cubic feet of gas. In the 
production of this commodity 70,659.6 tons of coal and 1,931,173 
gallons of oil were used. 

Street Railways 
Notwithstanding the rapid increase in other means of competi- 
tive transportation the street car systems of the State continue to 
hold their place as a transportation factor in the cities where these 
lines are operated. As evidence of this fact reports of these com- 
panies show that during the year 1927 they carried 26,897,077 pas- 
sengers. It is also noted that as a means of strengthening their 
position many of these lines are now employing supplemental bus 
service in lieu of extending their rails. Within the past two years 
there has been a large growth in this respect. 

Capital Issues Law 
The Capital Issues Law, passed by the Legislature of 1925, was 
amended by the Legislature of 1927 by substituting a new law, 
although a few changes were made in the provisions of the Act of 
1925. The principal changes consisted of: 

(a) Registration by notification. 

(b) Decrease in registration fees both as to notification and 
by qualification. 

(c) Clear definitions of violations. 

The law became effective on March 7, 1927, and continued the 
same officers as the administrators under the law; and, since its 
effective date, the work has been conducted without interruption 
by the Department set up with the Corporation Commission. 

The provisions of the law of 1927 immediately demonstrated their 
value, in that greater discrimination be exercised between the differ- 
ent classes of securities offered for registration for sale to the public. 



16 N. C. Corporation Commission 

This discrimination made possible greater restrictions with refer- 
ence to securities not thought of sufficient value to meet proper 
requirements ; and, as the result of the Act of 1927, it is felt that 
tremendous strides have been made in the field of security regu- 
lation in North Carolina. 

Experience has not demonstrated any necessity for amendments 
and the business in the State has experienced a growth which justi- 
fies the continuance of the present law. From time to time, how- 
ever, the Department has been faced with the question of including 
or excluding real estate promotions; but with the aid and assist- 
ance of the Keal Estate Board, created by the Legislature of 1927 
for a few counties in the State, these problems have in most cases 
been successfully solved. 

It is almost impossible, under any circumstances, to estimate the 
saving to the people of North Carolina resulting from the adminis- 
tration of the Capital Issues Law. The estimate cannot be based 
upon the issues of securities denied admission to registration, be- 
cause the terms of the law exclude many issues which otherwise 
would be offered for sale. The Department has followed a policy 
of getting in touch with each new corporation formed in the State 
and of using the press for the purpose of advising the public of 
fraudulent securities offered through channels beyond the control 
of the Department. These policies have prevented violations of the 
law and have, we believe, contributed to the success of the enforce- 
mnt of the act. 

Under the provisions of the law, dealers and salesmen have been 
held to a stricter accountability and with this has come a spirit of 
cooperation from the dealers of the State, which has made possible 
the building up of a valuable and constructive spirit. Greater care 
seems to have been exercised in the selection of salesmen and deal- 
ers have shown a commendable disposition to discriminate care- 
fully between securities offered for sale by them. 

Prosecutions under the Capital Issues Law have been confined to 
two instances. One violation occurred in the western part of the 
State in connection with the promotion of a chain store proposition, 
and the other in the south-central section of the State in connec- 
tion with the promotion of a mining proposition. It is significant 
that the violations have been confined to rather small proportions, 
the amount involved in either case being very small when consid- 
ered in connection with legitimate issues which have been sold in 
compliance with the statute. 



North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 



Letter of Transmittal 17 

The Department does not hesitate to say that the activity under 
the Capital Issues Law has contributed materially to the protec- 
tion of the investing public in the State of North Carolina. The 
law is recognized by many as an outstanding improvement of the 
regulatory acts which came into existence only a few years ago. 
It is in advance of the Uniform Law, now before the Commission 
on Uniform Laws, and represents the experience of many states in 
connection with the regulation of securities. It is a valuable asset 
to the development of the State of North Carolina. 

During the year 1927, 233 salesmen and dealers were registered; 
34 securities were registered ; 777 notifications of dealer's intention 
to sell were examined ; 57 special investigations were made, 8 indict- 
ments were brought, and 8 complaints and orders were drawn in 
receiverships. Five cases are pending in court. The receipts from 
all sources were $8,623.80. 

Banking Department 

The Legislature at the Session of 1927 authorized the Corporation 
Commission to take over the liquidation of such banks as should 
become insolvent or should be turned over to it by their boards of 
directors. The Division of Liquidation began operation about May 
1, 1927. Below is a statement of the progress of the Division, from 
May 1, 1927, to December 1, 1928. 

Assets taken over as shown on the books 

of banks $2,830,390.11 

Stock assessments collected 197,767.38 

Bonds collected 20,000.00 

Income 42,724.82 

Total $3,090,882.31 

Collections have been made and credi- 
tors satisfied as follows : 

Depositors $463,351.15 

Preferred creditors 171,383.24 

Bills payable (secured in- 
cluding interest) 434,469.05 

Accounts payable 6,164.93 

Re-discounts collected and 

remitted 9,973.86 

Total 1,085,342.23 



18 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Expense : 

Liquidating expense 33,498.66 

Courts costs and attorneys' 
fees 4,181.65 

Operation of properties 24,570.93 62,251.24 

Cash on deposit in banks 102,527.13 



Total 11,250,120.60 



Balance (book value) $1,840,761.71 

Liabilities of banks at closing (exclusive 

of proprietary liability)..... 2,338,707.07 

Liabilities met 1,085,342.23 



Outstanding 11,253,364.84 

Per cent liquidated 46.4 

Cost of liquidation : 

Liquidating expense 2.5 

Court costs, etc 4 

Operation of properties 1 

The statement shows collections of $1,250,120.60 and disburse- 
ments to creditors of $1,085,342.23, and a cost of liquidation of 
$33,498.66. This item, cost of liquidation, covers a cost of collec- 
tion and of disbursement of slightly over 2% per cent. The statute 
governing receiverships permits 5 per cent each for collections and 
disbursements. The item "income" consists of interest actually 
collected on the notes and judgments of the banks, interest on bank 
balances and rent from the various properties of the banks. This 
income less the cost of operating the properties pays approximately 
two-thirds of the cost of liquidation, leaving only one-third to be 
borne by the assets of these institutions. 

While the division has been in operation since May 1, 1927, not 
all of the institutions have been in its hands during the whole 
period. Seventy per cent of the liabilities of the first institution 
to come into its hands have been met, while at one of the last in- 
stitutions where the division's representative has been in charge 
less than five months, 26 per cent of the liabilities have been met 
and funds are on deposit to meet another 40 per cent. At a third 
institution where the division's representative has been in charge 
one year, the liabilities have been reduced 75 per cent. The average 



Letter of Transmittal 19 

reduction in liability other than proprietary for all the institutions 
during the period of their control by the division and up to Decem- 
ber 1, 1928, is 46 per cent. 

Motor Vehicle Transportation 

In holding hearings incident to the filing of 263 applications 
for bus franchise certificates, covering 5,052 miles of highways, not 
one appeal has been taken from the Commission's action. In ref- 
erence to construction of the law with respect to rules and regula- 
tions requiring the transportation of colored passengers, upon 
the petition of the Transportation Committee of the North Caro- 
lina Commission on Interracial Cooperation the Commission held 
that it was without jurisdiction to pass upon the matter. Appeal 
was taken from this decision and the matter is still pending in 
the Superior Court. 

The 6 per cent franchise tax for the year ended June 30, 1928, 
amounted to approximately |200,000. The amounts of public lia- 
bility and property damage insurance required by the Commission 
under the compulsory insurance provision of the act cost the oper- 
ators an annual premium of approximately the same amount as 
the tax, making both insurance and franchise cost probably not 
less than 10 per cent of the gross annual earnings. 

It is estimated that the number of passengers carried each year 
probably equals, iu numbers, the population of the State. To many 
isolated communities and small towns it has provided the first 
regular means of public transportation and to our larger cities a 
frequency of service hitherto unknown. 

Lack of cooperation between many of the operators has been 
noticeable to a marked degree. We also find that some operators 
do not have, and apparently cannot acquire, the public service 
viewpoint; but by the practice of better business methods and by 
consolidation we hope for improvement. Many of our operators 
have three and four hundred thousand dollars invested in equip- 
ment alone, and the cancellation of a franchise certificate, the only 
penalty that can be imposed by this Commission, is an extreme 
one. Lesser penalties, such as fines, may be imposed by the courts, 
but because of the time and expense which would be involved, the 
Commission has not sought the use of the courts for redress in 
cases of minor offenses. 

Practically all our carriers of passengers depend upon local pas- 
sengers for the bulk of revenue received. Few of these operators 
have attempted the through, "long haul" travel, but recently oper- 



20 N. C. Corporation Commission 

ators who have been experimenting with such distances as Chicago 
to Miami and ^ew York to San Francisco have turned their atten- 
tion southward and as motor-units and man-power organized with 
a knowledge of the locality to be served appear to be the necessary 
factors, negotiations are now under way which may lead to con- 
nections that will increase the revenue both to the carriers and to 
the State. The through travel carrier needs the support of the 
local business in order to maintain convenient and frequent sched- 
ules, and the local carrier should have the through travel in order 
to be able to more easily maintain the better class of equipment and 
service which the public demands of a modern bus line. 

The bus business had disastrous financial experience in unregu- 
lated operation prior to regulation by states. As a result, this 
business has been reluctant to make sufficient investment to de- 
velop interstate bus service that it might otherwise have done. 
Proposed legislation is now pending in Congress with a view to 
regulating this. More than forty states now have regulatory laws. 

The transportation of freight and express is probably developing 
faster at present than at any time since the passage of the act. 
The easy tax requirement provided in the Revenue Act for trucks 
being operated for hire at first almost nullified that part of the 
motor vehicle law providing for regulation of motor vehicles trans- 
porting property for compensation. Transportation of freight by 
truck presents a very different problem from that of the passenger 
transportation. We have been able to regulate the passenger car- 
riers with very little cost to the State and are supervising them 
with practically no field force, but to regulate the property car- 
riers with the same degree of efficiency would take considerable 
money and a large field force for a period of at least two years, 
when the field organization could be reduced. 

The 1925 law provided the same immunity from competition for 
freight and express carriers as that provided for passenger car- 
riers. The 1927 Legislature amended this by providing that the 
Commission cannot refuse to grant an original application for a 
freight or express line solely because of multiplicity of similar 
operators on the same highway between the same termini. The 
reason for this amendment was that a large number of our truck 
operators were not financially able to meet the public demand in 
truck capacity and this gave the Commission an opportunity to 
supply the demand without depriving the original operator of his 
certificate. The Commission has this same power with reference 
to passenger service, where it finds public convenience and necessity 



Letter op Transmittal 21 

for additional service, after giving the original operator opportunity 
by 30 days' notice to provide same. 

We believe the operation of this law has been very satisfactorily 
when we consider that there are probably twenty-five hundred "for 
hire" passenger cars, some of which exceed seven passenger capacity, 
and probably 25 per cent of the 40,000 trucks in the State operat- 
ing outside the jurisdiction of the Commission but supposedly 
operating under a tax license from the Revenue Department. As 
motor traffic increases, we believe, it will be necessary to require 
all classes of public service motor vehicles to operate under a fran- 
chise certificate. This is proving satisfactory in many states. 

That section of the Revenue Act of 1927, requiring drivers of 
motor vehicles in public service to obtain a permit and pay an 
annual fee of .$5.0O, has been unsatisfactory in so far as it applies 
to drivers of taxicabs and "for hire" cars because of the following 
conditions : 

1. The cars used in this service are not regulated 
in any manner. 

2. Such drivers never have the amount of the fee 
and it must, therefore, be paid by the owner of the car ; 
and, when paid by him, the driver invariably quits be- 
fore his employer is reimbursed. 

3. It is doubtful if the entire annual amount of 
the fees collected from this source would be sufficient 
to properly enforce the law with respect to this class 
of employees. 

Generally speaking, the drivers of buses are more reliable. As 
the satisfactory operation of the bus business falls directly upon 
them so far as public contact is concerned, the requirement for 
them to be licensed has been a feature which has made bus regu- 
lation much simpler than it might have been. They deserve spe- 
cial mention because of the few accidents of a serious nature in- 
volving buses, especially when compared with the many fatalities 
upon our highways. Such drivers, in the interest of safety on our 
highways, should be examined for defects in sight and hearing; 
but to require this expense in addition to a fee to the State, in 
its most liberal sense, is little less than excessive ; therefore, we 
believe that the State can afford to recede therefrom. 

Aviation 

This is now by no means a new form of transportation. The first 
successful flight was made in this State 25 years ago this December. 
While the Federal Government and other states have legislated 



22 N. C. Corporation Commission 

upon this subject, North Carolina is still silent thereon. The Na- 
tional Association of Railroad and Public Utilities Commission- 
ers, at its last meeting, appointed a committee to draft a uniform 
act for the states. 

Hon. C. M. Young, Director of Aeronautics, Department of 
Commerce, in an article commemorating the flight at Kitty Hawk, 
December 17, 1903, stated: 

The Department requires that all airplanes carry 
identification number whether engaged in interstate, 
intrastate, or private operations, but it can not estab- 
lish minimum requirements for structural standards 
in airplanes which are operated solely within one state. 
As a result airplanes which might be and frequently 
are condemned by the Department's inspectors and are 
refused federal licenses for interstate commerce may 
obtain identification numbers and operate within their 
own state carrying passengers or property. 

The only effective method of covering this situation 
is by state legislative action. This has already been 
initiated in several states and is being consid- 
ered in others. The result of such legislative 
action in all of the states will eliminate the condemned 
or unairworthy airplanes. The result will be that the 
confidence of the laymen will be greatly increased. At 
present it makes no difference to him whether he reads 
that an airplane which crashed was identified or li- 
censed. He does not understand that the licensed air- 
plane would have been inspected and passed as air- 
worthy, while the identified airplane may have been 
one that was condemned by the Department of Com- 
merce. 

We hope to have such legislation as may be recommended by the 
Committee of the National Association of Railroad and Public 
Utilities Commissioners for the consideration of yourself and the 
Legislature at the coming session. 

Respectfully, 

W. T. Lee, Chairman, 
Geo. P. Pell, 
A. J. Maxwell, 

Commissioners. 
Attest : 
R. O. Self, Chief Clerk. 
W. G. Womble, Rate Clerk. 
John Mitchell, Chief Bank Examiner. 
I. M. Bailey, Counsel. 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENTS OF COMPLAINTS 

RAILROAD COMPANIES 

Order 

IN THE MATTER OF RATES ON FERTILIZER AND FERTILIZER 
MATERIALS BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

CORRECTION 

Carload Minimum Weights 

This order is intended to make effective within North Carolina the same 
minimum carload weights as authorized by order of the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission in Docket 16295, except that cottonseed hulls has been 
eliminated from Appendix carrying list of fertilizer materials. In other 
words, the carload minimum weights on manufactured fertilizer and on 
fertilizer materials should be 40,000 pounds, except that no reduction in 
the minimum weight is required on articles named in Appendix "A' ? which 
carry a higher minimum than 40,000 pounds. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Clerk. 

NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION COMMISSION V. ALL COMMON 
CARRIERS BY RAIL WITHIN NORTH CAROLINA. IN THE MAT- 
TER OF RATES ON FERTILIZER AND FERTILIZER MATERIAL, BE- 
TWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA, UPON COMMISSION'S OWN 
MOTION. 

Order 

Hearing in the above case was held in the hearing room of the Commission 
at Raleigh, North Carolina, December 9, 1924, with the following appear- 
ances : 

J. A. Streyer, T. M., American Short Line Railroad Association, At- 
lanta, Ga. 

G. F. Dempsey, G. F. A., Aberdeen & Rockfish Railroad Company, 
Fayetteville, N. C. 

J. W. Perrin, A. F. T. M., A. C. L. Railroad Company, Wilmington, 
North Carolina. 

E T. Ussery, Assistant to President, Atlantic & Western Railroad, 
Sanford, N. C. 

A. E. Pittman, Assistant to Traffic Manager, Atlantic & Yadkin Rail- 
way (J. W. Fry and A. E. Smith, Receivers), Greensboro, N. C. 

N. S. Richardson, Traffic Manager, Dover — Southbound Railroad, 
Dover, N. C. 

W. A. Marshall, Chief Clerk, Traffic Dept, Norfolk Southern Rail- 
road Company, Carolina Railroad Company and Kinston-Carolina Rail- 
road, Norfolk, Va. 

T. T. Massengill, A. G. F. A., S. A. L. Railway Company, Norfolk, Va. 

Murray Allen, Attorney S. A L, Railway Company, Raleigh, N. C. 

E. R. Gardner, Commerce Agent, Southern Railway, Washington, D. C. 

W. N. McGehee, Commerce Counsel, Southern Railway, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



24 .N. C. Corporation Commission 

D. A. Dashiell, Chairman, Traffic Committee, National Fertilizer As- 
sociation, Southern Fertilizer Association, F. S. Royster Guano Com- 
pany, Armour Fertilizer Works, Swift & Co., and International Agri- 
cultural Corporation. 

A. J. Whitman, T. M., the American Agricultural Chemical Company, 
New York City. 

T. A. Bosley, T. M., Virginia-Carolina Chemical Company, Richmond, 
Virginia. 

J. I. Morgan, Manager, Farmville Oil & Fertilizer Company, Farm- 
ville, N. C. 

O. L. Stubbs, T. M., Eastern Carolina Oil Company, Norfolk, Va. 

R. L. Askea, T. M., Traffic Bureau, Raleigh Chamber of Commerce, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

S. O. Izlar, Caraleigh Phosphate & Fertilizer Works, Raleigh, N. C. 

The following was made as an opening statement by Chairman Lee : 

Is there any objection to proceeding to opening the hearing? If there 
is no objection, I desire to make a short statement. For sometime past 
verbal complaints have been reaching the Commission concerning cur- 
rent rates on fertilizer within the State. However, we took no action 
in the matter, on account of the fact that the present rates were made 
by the Special Rate Commission, appointed by Governor Craig, and 
since that time have received the same increases and reductions as 
other rates in the south generally ; and on account of the further fact 
that when these rates were originally put in effect within the State 
they were lower, upon a mileage basis, than fertilizer rates generally 
in this territory. Soon after these mileage rates became effective action 
was started before the Interstate Commerce Commission by shippers in 
Norfolk and Charleston claiming discrimination against these points in 
shipping fertilizer into North Carolina as against this mileage scale 
applicable between points in this State. Our Commission defeated these 
cases and succeeded in making this scale stand up, while the rates from 
Norfolk and* Charleston into the State were reduced to the same level, 
or about 20 cents per ton. Since that time this scale, which became 
known as the Royster Scale, has been made applicable throughout our 
territory generally, both interstate as well as intrastate. For these 
reasons our Commission has hesitated to take action upon its own mo- 
tion looking to a reduction in these rates ; however, in February, 1924, 
the South Carolina Commission reduced fertilizer rates in that State 
approximately 12 per cent, and later the Alabama Commission lowered 
their fertilizer rates ; still later, and only recently, the Georgia Com- 
mission has likewise made reductions. We are informed that the car- 
riers have brought, or will bring, before the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission the question of reasonableness of reductions made in the rates 
south of us. but in the meantime our Commission determined to review 
our fertilizer rates and give the carriers an opportunity to justify the 
present rates and show why they should not be reduced, and at the 
same time give shippers and receivers an opportunity to present their 
views covering the subject. We are here now for the purpose of hear- 
ing both sides of the matter. 

Testimony was presented both by the carriers and shippers, the former 
contending that since the Interstate Commerce Commission had recently 
given notice of an Ex Parte proceeding before that body inquiring into fer- 
tilizer rates generally within the South, nothing should be done within 
North Carolina until the question of interstate rates was settled. It was 
the shippers' opinion that in view of the investigation of fertilizer rates 
in certain sections of the South, the intrastate rates in North Carolina should 
receive prompt attention ; however, in view of this situation, this Commis- 
sion after due consideration, deemed it advisable to await action by the In- 
terstate Commerce Commission in the matter of interstate rates, and in the 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 25 

meantime to intervene in the case before that body in order to get before 
it the views of our Commission. The views of this Commission were duly 
presented by Commissioner Maxwell before the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission, (in I. C. C. Docket 16295, rates on fertilizer and fertilizer materials 
between Southern points) at Montgomery, Ala., at hearing beginning Sep- 
tember 2, 1925, as follows : 

"On behalf of the North Carolina Corporation Commission, I wish to 
make the following statement : 

"Rates on fertilizer between points in North Carolina prior to 1913, were 
on substantially an equal basis with interstate rates from Norfolk, Va., and 
Charleston, S. C. Upon order of a special legislative commission in 1913, 
rates on fertilizer between points in North Carolina were reduced twenty 
cents per ton. Resulting from this reduction, complaint was filed by the 
Royster Guano Company, in Norfolk, alleging discrimination in the inter- 
state rates, and subsequently a similar complaint from the Charleston 
Freight Steering Committee. Upon hearing of these complaints, the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission found a discrimination to exist against the 
interstate rates and in favor of the intrastate rates, which the carriers were 
required to remove by reduction of the interstate rates to the level of the 
rates between points in North Carolina and restoring an equal relationship 
as between intra and interstate rates. In 1924, in the Blackshear case, 
the Interstate Commerce Commission prescribed a lower level of rates to 
apply interstate between Blackshear, Ga., and points in Florida than the 
level of rates approved in the case of the Royster Guano Company and of 
the Charleston Freight Steering Committee. 

"Upon investigation, it also appeared that the rates between points in 
North Carolina are on a higher level than like rates in any other of the 
southeastern States. In December, 1924. a hearing was assigned before the 
North Carolina Corporation Commission to determine if there should be 
a reduction of rates on fertilizer between points in North Carolina. No order 
lias yet been issued by the North Carolina Corporation Commission re- 
sulting from this hearing for the reasons : 

"First, it was apparent after the completion of the record in that hearing 
that an order could not be made effective until the larger part of the move- 
ment for the crop season of 1925 had taken place. 

"Second, that a reduction in rates between points in North Carolina without 
a corresponding reduction in interstate rates would create another discrim- 
inatory situation with respect to interstate shippers, and 

"Third, the order for this general investigation by the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission of fertilizer rates in the Southeast had been issued and 
it seemed reasonable to expect that a final determination fixing a uniform 
general level of interstate rates within the Southeast would be made be- 
fore the beginning of the fertilizer movement for the next crop season. 

"For these reasons, no order has been made by the North Carolina Cor- 
poration Commission in its proceeding above referred to and with the hope 
and expectation that such order may be made before the beginning of an- 
other season for movement of fertilizer and under conditions which will 
permit a readjustment of rates on fertilizer between points in North Carolina 
on a level no higher than obtains generally throughout the Southeast and 
•without creating any discrimination against interstate shippers. It seems 



26 N. C. Corporation Commission 

to us apparent that the level of rates on fertilizer between points in North 
Carolina adopted in 1913, and which became the basis for the scale of rates 
known as the Royster Scale, is a higher scale of rates than should be con- 
tinued between points in North Carolina or adopted for general application, 
state and interstate, throughout the Southeast. The Interstate Commerce 
Commission has found in the Blackshear Case that the issues involved in 
the case of the Royster Guano Company and of the Charleston Freight Steer- 
ing Committee were limited to the question of removal of discrimination 
against interstate shippers involved in these complaints and that it was not 
the intention in those proceedings to fix a general level of rates on fertilizer 
for application throughout the Southeast. 

"It is our opinion that a lower level than the Royster Scale should be 
adopted for general application throughout the Southeast, and it is the pur- 
pose of the North Carolina Corporation Commission to revise the schedule 
of rates on fertilizer between points in North Carolina before the season 
for another general movement of fertilizer and as soon as this may be done 
without creating discrimination against interstate shippers." 

The Interstate Commerce Commission issued its decision in the above case 
(113 I. C. C. 16295) July 19, 1926, and for historical purposes we quote the 
opening paragraph of its order : 

Eastman, Commissioner : 

Dissatisfaction on the part of shippers and users as well as of car- 
riers with the rates on commercial fertilizer and fertilizer materials 
in southern territory has for sometime been increasingly evident. Our 
decisions upon such formal complaints as have been brought have served 
only to mitigate the discontent in the particular sections affected. In- 
terstate rates vary greatly for substantially similar hauls ; many in- 
defensible fourth-section departures exist; and the intrastate rates which 
have been enforced by some of the States are attacked by the carriers 
as unreasonably low, and it is alleged that they adversely effect manu- 
facturers and dealers shipping into those States over interstate routes. 
During 1924, three petitions were filed with us by carriers seeking 
relief under section 13 of the interstate commerce act from the intra- 
state rates, respectively, in South Carolina, Alabama and Georgia. Three 
times the rates on fertilizer from Norfolk, Va., to points in North 
Carolina have been before us in what have come to be known as the 
Royster cases, but the rates there finally prescribed are now deemed 
unsatisfactory by the Corporation Commission of North Carolina. These 
conditions obtaining throughout southern territory led us on October 
7, 1924. upon our own motion, to institute a general investigation and 
inquiry — 

Into and concerning said interstate rates on fertilizers, fertilizer 
compounds, and fertilizer materials and the charges resulting there- 
from * * * with a view to determining whether said rates and 
charges are unreasonable or are unduly prejudicial to or unduly pre- 
ferential of particular localities or persons and to making such order 
or orders as may be proper in the premises. 
The statistical position of the fertilizer industry in commerce, including 
distribution and use in the different sections of the South was gone into by 
the Interstate Commerce Commission in the general case (113 I. C. C. 389) 
and the record does not reveal any conflict, but on the contrary is in line 
with evidence produced before this Commission and the record in both cases 
is conclusive on the point of justifying reasonableness of an increased mini- 
mum carload weight on mixed fertilizer from 15 to 20 tons, in fact this 
is the minimum proposed by North Carolina shippers. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 



27 



Upon the record before us no other method of determining just and rea- 
sonable rates is possible than the exercise of our best judgment in the light 
of all evidence submitted. After careful consideration of this evidence, and 
having in mind the principles which we believe should be applied in dis- 
tributing the burden of rail transportation we have reached the conclusion 
that the scale shown below should be adopted. 

We, therefore, find that the rates applicable to the intrastate transporta- 
tion in carloads of manufactured fertilizers and of the fertilizer materials 
listed in Appendix A hereto over standard lines (Listed in Appendix B) 
between points in North Carolina are. and for the future will be, unreason- 
able to the extent that they exceed rates per net ton based on the distance 
scale shown in the table below, subject to the minimum carload weight of 
40,000 pounds in the case of manufactured fertilizer, and 40.000 minimum 
in the case of mixed carloads of fertilizer materials ; provided, however, that 
in applying such rates to the longer hauls the respondent carriers may for 
purposes of tariff simplification, subject to our approval, use groups of 
moderate extent and measure the rates by distances to and from fairly 
representative points in such groups. 



Distances 

10 miles and under 

15 miles and over 

20 miles and over 

25 miles and over 

30 miles and over 

35 miles and over 

40 miles and over 

45 miles and over 

50 miles and over 

55 miles and over 

60 miles and over 

65 miles and over 

70 miles and over 

75 miles and over 

80 miles and over 

85 miles and over 

90 miles and over 

95 miles and over 

100 miles and over 

110 miles and over 

120 miles and over 

130 miles and over 

140 miles and over 

150 miles and over 

160 miles and over 

170 miles and over 

180 miles and over 

190 miles and over 





Rate 




in Cents 




100 


10 


110 


15 


120 


20 


125 


25 


135 


30 


140 


35 


150 


40 


155 


45 


165 


50 


170 


55 


180 


60 


185 


65 


195 


70 


200 


75 


205 


80 


210 


85 


215 


90 


220 


95 


225 


100 


235 


110 


245 


120 


255 


130 


265 


140 


275 


150 


285 


160 


295 


170 


305 


180 


315 



Rate 

Distances in Cents 

200 miles and over 190 320 

210 miles and over 200 330 

220 miles and over 210 335 

230 miles and over 220 345 

240 miles and over 230 350 

250 miles and over 240 360 

260 miles and over 250 365 

270 miles and over 260 375 

280 miles and over 270 380 

300 miles and over 280 395 

320 miles and over 300 410 

340 miles and over 320 425 

360 miles and over 340 440 

380 miles and over 360 450 

400 miles and over 380 460 

420 miles and over 400 470 

440 miles and over 420 480 

460 miles and over 440 490 

480 miles and over 460 500 

500 miles and over 480 505 

520 miles and over 500 515 

540 miles and over 520 525 

560 miles and over 540 535 

580 miles and over 560 545 

600 miles and over 580 555 

620 miles and over 600 565 

640 miles and over 620 575 

660 miles and over 640 585 



We further find that the rates applicable to the intrastate transportation, 
in carloads of the aforesaid mixed fertilizers and fertilizer materials (see 
Appendix A) throughout North Carolina over routes made up, in whole or 
in part, of any of the short or weak lines listed in Appendix C (except the 
Norfolk Southern) and for the future will be unreasonable to the extent 
that they exceed rates per net ton based on the distance scale shown in 
the table above plus an arbitrary of not to exceed 50 cents per net ton, sub- 
ject to the minimum carload weights found reasonable, such arbitrary to 
accrue solely to the participating short or weak line or lines. 



28 N. C. Corporation Commission 

We further find that the rates applicable to the intrastate transportation, 
in carloads, of the aforesaid mixed fertilizer and fertilizer materials through- 
out North Carolina over routes made up, in whole or in part of the lines of 
the Norfolk Southern Railroad are, and for the future will be, unreasonable 
to the extent that they exceed rates per net ton based on the distance scale 
shown in the table above, subject to the minimum carload weights, found 
reasonable, plus 10 per cent, but in no event to exceed 50 cents per net ton,, 
such excess over and above the standard rates to accrue solely to the Nor- 
folk Southern Railroad. 

The carriers propose to maintain rates on less-than-carload traffic, as do 
also the shippers, made 120 per cent of the carload rates. This is the classi- 
fication basis in southern territory and has been in effect for sometime. The 
Interstate Commerce Commission found this spread between less-than-car- 
load and carload rates too small when compared with the spread between 
corresponding rates on other commodities. The less-than-carload fertilizer 
traffic in this territory is apparently not of great proportions. While the 
record is not altogether satisfactory upon this point the Interstate Commerce 
Commission found it adequate to warrant the conclusion that the less-than- 
carload rates should not be less than 180 per cent of the carload rates. 

We, therefore, find that the rates applicable to the intrastate transporta- 
tion in less-than-carloads of the aforesaid mixed fertilizers and fertilizer 
materials throughout North Carolina, described in Appendix A hereto, are, 
and for the future will be, unreasonable to the extent that they exceed rates- 
per net ton equal to 130 per cent of the corresponding rates prescribed 
herein for carload shipments. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That all common carriers by rail within the 
State be and they are hereby ordered, and directed to put in force on Janu- 
ary 1st, 1927, rates on fertilizer and fertilizer materials; listed in Appen- 
dix A, hereto attached, and hereby made a part of this order, over standard 
lines listed in Appendix B, the mileage scale shown below in cents per ton of 
2,000 pounds: 

Rate 
Distances in Cents Distances 

10 miles and under 100 140 miles and over 

15 miles and over 10 110 150 miles and over 

20 miles and over 15 120 160 miles and over 

25 miles and over 20 125 170 miles and over 

30 miles and over 25 135 180 miles and over 

35 miles and over 30 140 190 miles and over 

40 miles and over 35 150 200 miles and over 

45 miles and over 40 155 210 miles and over 

50 miles and over 45 165 220 miles and over 

55 miles and over 50 170 230 miles and over 

60 miles and over 55 180 240 miles and over 

65 miles and over 60 185 250 miles and over 

70 miles and over 65 195 260 miles and over 

75 miles and over 70 200 270 miles and over 

80 miles and over 75 205 280 miles and over 

85 miles and over 80 210 300 miles and over 

90 miles and over 85 215 320 miles and over 

95 miles and over 90 220 340 miles and over 

100 miles and over 95 225 360 miles and over 

110 miles and over 100 235 380 miles and over 

120 miles and over 110 245 400 miles and over 

130 miles and over 120 255 420 miles and over 





Rate 




in Cents: 


130 


265 


140 


275 


150 


285 


160 


295 


170 


305. 


180 


315 


190 


320 


200 


330 


210 


335 


220 


345 


230 


350* 


240 


360 


250 


365 


260 


375 


270 


380 


280 


395 


300 


410 


320 


425 


340 


440 


360 


450 


380 


460 


400 


470> 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 29 







Rate 






Rate 


Distance 




in Cents 


Distance 




in Cents 


440 miles and 


420 


480 


560 miles and 


540 


535 


460 miles and 


440 


490 


580 miles and 


560 


545 


480 miles and 


460 


500 


600 miles and 


580 


555 


500 miles and 


480 


505 


620 miles and 


600 


565 


520 miles and 


500 


515 


640 miles and 


620 


575 


540 miles and 


520 


525 


060 miles and 


640 


585 



In computing distances for the application of the foregoing rates the 
shortest route shall be used over which carload traffic can be moved without 
transfer of lading. 

It is Further Ordered, That the short or weak lines, listed in Appendix 
C, put in force on January 1, 1927, rates on fertilizer and fertilizer materials 
made the same as rates provided above to apply over standard lines plus 
50 cents per ton, the arbitrary of 50 cents per ton shall accrue solely to the 
said weak lines, except that the Norfolk Southern Railroad shall apply over 
its lines rates made the same as rate table provided above for standard lines 
plus 10 per cent, but in no event to exceed 50 cents per net ton, such excess 
above the standard rates to accrue solely to the Norfolk Southern Railroad. 

It is Further Ordered, That all common carriers by rail within the State 
in applying rates provided above be, and they are hereby ordered and di- 
rected to make said rates throughout the State over routes made up in whole, 
or in part, of the short or weak lines, including the Norfolk Southern 
Railroad in accordance with basis shown above for such short or weak lines, 
including the Norfolk Southern Railroad, provided that all common car- 
riers by rail within the State are hereby authorized to compete with each 
other upon the filing of such competitive rates with this Commission, and 
provided further in no case shall the basis provided above operate to make 
rates in any case higher than the lowest combination. 

It is Further Ordered, That all common carriers by rail within the State 
put in force January 1, 1927, simultaneously with the carload rates on fer- 
tilizer, and fertilizer materials provided above, less-than-carload rates on 
the same commodity or commodities, rates which shall not exceed 130 per 
cent of the corresponding rates hereinbefore prescribed for carload move- 
ments. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 30th day of November, 1926. Clerk. 



30 N. C. Corporation Commission 

APPENDIX "A" 

List of Fertilizer Materials in Straight Carloads 

Ammonia, sulphate of, in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 
40,000 pounds. 

Ashes: 

Bagasse, cactus, cotton boll, burr or seed hull, manure, sage brush or wood, 
in packages, or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 30,000 pounds. 

Kelp, in bags, C. L., minimum weight, 30,000 pounds. 

Rice hull, in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 30,000 pounds. 

Beets slops (beet sugar final molasses residuum), in tank cars, C. L., 
subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classification. 

Blood, dried, in bulk in bags or barrels, or in bulk. C. L., minimum weight, 
40,000 pounds. 

Bone, charred, filtering (animal charcoal), spent, in bags, C. L., minimum 
weight, 36,000 pounds. 

Bones, other than human or fresh-meat bones : Ground, in bags or barrels, 
C. L., minimum weight, 30,000 pounds. 

Not ground, in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum, weight 30,000 pounds. 

Castor-bean hulls or stems, ground or not ground, in packages or in bulk, 
C. L.. minimum weight, 30,000 pounds. 

Castor pomace, in bags or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 40,000 pounds. 

Cement flue dust, in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 40,000 
pounds. 

Cocoa-bean shells, ground, in bulk in bags, C. L., minimum weight, 40,000 
pounds. 

Cotton seed cake, or meal, loose or in bags, C. L., minimum weight, 40.000 
pounds. 

Cyanamid, in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 40,000 pounds. 

Distillery molasses fertilizer residuum (dry or liquid residuum from mo- 
lasses distillation). 

Liquid, in tank cars, C. L., subject to Rule 35 of Southern Classifica- 
tion. Dry, in bags, barrels or boxes, C. L., minimum weight, 36,000 
pounds. 

Fertilizer blacks (refuse black material for coloring fertilizers), in bulk 
in bags or barrels, C. L., minimum weight, 36,000 pounds. 

Fertilizer wool refuse, in machine-pressed bales, C. L., minimum weight, 
30,000 pounds, subject to Rule 34. 

Fertilizer compounds (manufactured fertilizers) N. O. I. B. N., dry, in 
bulk in cloth or paper bags or in bulk in barrels or boxes, C. L., minimum 
weight, 30,000 pounds. 

Fish scrap, dry, not ground nor pulverized, or acid fish scrap, in packages, 
or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 36,000 pounds. 
Or ape Pomace: 

Dry, in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight. 36,000 pounds. 

Other than dry, in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 36,000 
pounds. 

Iron or steel flue dust, in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 
50.000 Dounds. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 31 

Lime Nitrogen: 

In iron or steel barrels, C. L., minimum weight, 40,000 pounds. 

In tank cars, C. L., subject to Rule 35 of Southern classitication. 

Lime (calcium), nitrate of, in double bags or in bulk in barrels, C. L., 
minimum weight, 40.000 pounds. 

Meal: 

Hoof of horn, in bags or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 30,000 pounds. 

Kapok seed, in bags or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 60,000 pounds. 

Rape seed, in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight. 40,000 pounds. 

Senna bean, in bags, C. L., minimum weight, 40,000 pounds. 

Mussel meat, not edible, dry, in bags or barrels, C. L. minimum weight, 
30,000 pounds. 

Peanut oil cake or oil cake meal, in bags or in bulk, C. L. minimum weight, 
40,000 pounds. 

Peat: 

Ground, in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 36,000 pounds. 

Not ground, in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 36,000 pounds. 

Phosphate, basic, in packages or in bulk C. L., minimum weight, 40.000 
pounds. 

Phosphate Rock: 

Ground or pulverized — 

Acidulated (acid phosphate), in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum 
weight, 40,000 pounds. 

Acidulated and ammoniated, in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum 
weight, 40,000 pounds. 

Potassium (Potash) : 

Alkali salts, crude, dry, in packages or in bulk. C. L., minimum weight, 
40,000 pounds. 

Beet or cane residuum, in bags, C. L., minimum weight, 40,000 pounds. 

Carbonate of, crude, in bulk, in barrels, C. L., minimum weight, 40.000 
pounds. 

Hartsalz, Kainit, Manure salts, double manure salts, or sylvanit, in pack- 
ages or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 40,000 pounds. 

Muriate of (chloride of potassium), in bags or bulk in barrels or boxes, 
or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 40.000 pounds. 

Suphate of, in bags or in bulk in barrels or boxes, or in bulk, C. L., mini- 
mum weight. 40,000 pounds. 

Tobacco crystals (tobacco potash salts), in bags or barrels, C. L. mini- 
mum weight. 40.000 pounds. 

Sea grass, sea moss, or seaweed: 

Kelp, dried or ground, in bags, C. L., minimum weight, 30.000 pounds. 

Seasame oil cake or oil cake meal, in bags or in bulk, C. L., minimum 
weight, 40,000 pounds. 

Shells, clam, mussel, or oyster: 

Crushed or ground in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 36.000 
pounds. 

Not crushed nor ground, in packages or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 
40.000 pounds. 



32 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Sodium (soda) : 

Nitrate of (Chili saltpetre), in bags or in bulk in barrels or boxes, or in 
bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 40,000 pounds. 

Nitre cake (crude bi-sulphate of soda), in packages or in bulk, C. L., 
minimum weight, 40,000 pounds. 

Soil compounds, containing two or more of the following ingredients: 
Potash Magnesia 

Phosphates Carbonates 

Sulphates Iron Oxides 

Lime Chlorides 

Silicates Manganese 

Carload minimum weight, 30,000 pounds. 

Soy (soja or soya) bean oil cake or oil cake meal, loose or in bags, C. 
L., minimum weight, 40,000 pounds. 

Sugar cake mud (refuse from sugar filter presses), in bags, C. L., mini- 
mum weight, 40,000 pounds. 

Sulphur, (brimestone), in bulk in bags or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 
40,000 pounds. 

Tankage: 

Garbage, dry, in bags or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 40,000 pounds. 

Tankage, N. O. I. B. N., in bags or in bulk, C. L., minimum weight, 
40,000 pounds. 

Tobacco, unmanufactured, stems, ground in bags, C. L., minimum weight, 
40,000 pounds. 

Tobacco dust, refuse, sand, or waste, in packages, or in bulk, C.L., minimum 
weight, 30,000 pounds. 

Less Carload 

Ashes: 

Bagasse, cactus, cotton boll, burr or seed hull, manure, sage, brush or 
wood, in bags. 

Kelp, in bags. 

Rice hull, in bags. 

Bones, other than human or fresh meat bones : 
Ground, in bags or barrels. 
Not ground, in bags or barrels, or in barrels with cloth tops. 

Castor bean hulls or stems, ground or not ground, in bags or barrels. 

Cotton seed cake or meal, in bags. 

Cyanamid, in bags or barrels. 

Fertilizing compound (manufactured fertilizers) N. O. I. B. N., dry, in 
bulk, in bags, barrels or boxes. 

Lime (calcium), nitrate of, in double bags or in bulk in barrels. 

Mussel meat, not edible, dry, in bags or barrels. 

Peanut oil cake or oil cake meal, in bags. 

Phosphate, basic, in bags. 
Phosphate rock: 

Ground or pulverized — 

Acidulated (acid phosphate), in bags or barrels. 

Acidulated and ammoniated, in bags or barrels. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 33 

Potassium (potash) : 

Alkali salts, crude, dry, in bulk in bags, barrels, or boxes. 

Hartsalz, kainit, manure salts, double manure salts- or sylvanit, in bags, 
3arrels, or boxes. 

Murate of (chloride of potassium), in bags or in bulk, in barrels, or boxes. 

Suphate of, in bags or in bulk, in barrels, or boxes. 

Tobacco crystals, (tobacco potash salts), in bags or barrels. 

Sea grass, sea moss, or seaweed: 
Kelp, dried or ground, in bags. 

Shells, clam, mussel or oyster: 

Crushed or ground, in bulk in bags, barrels or boxes. 

Not crushed nor ground, in bags, barrels or boxes. 

Sodium (soda), nitrate of (chili saltpetre), in bags or in bulk in bar- 
rels or boxes. 

Soy (soja or soya) bean oil cake or oil cake meal, in bags. 

Tankage: 
Garbage, dry, in bags. 
Tankage, N. O. I. B. N., in bags. 
Tobacco, unmanufactured, stems, ground, in bags. 

APPENDIX "B" 

Asheville Southern Railway Company. 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. 

Atlantic & Yadkin Railway Company (J. W. Fry, and A. E. Smith, Re- 
ceivers. ) 
Clinchfield Railroad. 

Carolina & Northwestern Railway Company. 
Carolina & Tennessee Southern Railway Company. 
Durham Southern Railway Company. 
East Carolina Railway. 

High Point, Randleman, Asheboro & Southern Railroad Company. 
Louisville & Nashville Railroad Company. 
Norfolk & Western Railway Company (all divisions). 
Piedmont & Northern Railway Company. 
Seaboard Air Line Railway Company. 
Southern Railway Company. 

Virginia & Carolina Southern Railroad Company. 
Washington & Vandemere Railroad Company. 
Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company. 
Yadkin Railroad Company. 

APPENDIX "C" 

Aberdeen & Rockfish Railroad Company. 
Appalachian Railway Company. 
Atlantic & Carolina Railroad Company. 
Atlantic & Western Railroad Company. 
Black Mountain Railway Company. 



34 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Bonlee & Western Railway Company. 

Carolina & Southern Railway Company. 

Carolina Railroad Company. 

Carolina & Northeastern Railroad Company. 

Carolina & Georgia Railway Company. 

Cliffside Railroad Company. 

Danville & Western Railway Company. 

Dover & Southbound Railroad Company. 

Graham County Railroad Company. 

Elkin & Alleghany Railroad Company. 

East Tennessee & Western N. C. Railroad Company. 

High Point, Thomasville & Denton Railroad Company. 

Kinston Carolina Railroad Company. 

Laurinburg & Southern Railroad Company. 

Lawndale Railway & Industrial Company. 

Linville River Railway Company. 

Maxton, Alma & Southbound Railroad Company. 

Moore Central Railway Company. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. 

Raleigh & Charleston Railroad Company. 

Rockingham Railroad Company. 

Tallulah Falls Railway Company. (J. F. Gray, Receiver). 

Tennessee & North Carolina Railway Company. 

The Townsville Railroad Company. 

Tuckaseegee & Southeastern Railway Company. 

Warrenton Railroad Company. 

Wilmington, Brunswick & Southern Railroad Company. 

NATIONAL OIL COMPANY v. ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD COM- 
PANY, CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY, NORFOLK SOUTHERN 
RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Order 

Hearing was held in this matter at Raleigh December 7, 1926. It appears 
the present rate on gasoline, or oil. in tank cars, carload, from Wimington, 
N. C, to Snow Hill, N. C, is forty-two (42) cents per hundred, which is a 
combination rate. There is a published through rate on the same commodity 
from Norfolk. Va., to Snow Hill, N. C, of forty (40) cents per hundred 
pounds, which the carriers allege was made the same as rate in effect from 
Norfolk to Maury, N. C, a station on the East Carolina Railway just across 
the country from Snow Hill. The distances to Snow Hill, are from Norfolk, 
Va., 164 miles ; from Wilmington, N. C, 126 miles. The rate on gasoline, 
carload, from . Norfolk, Va., to Kinston, N. C, is thirty (30) cents per hun- 
dred, and from Wilmington to Kinston, N. C. twenty-six and half (26^) 
cents per hundred pounds. The difference in the rate from Norfolk to Snow 
Hill over Kinston is ten (10) cents and the Commission is of the opinion, 
and so finds, that the Norfolk rate is discriminatory against Wilmington. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, 
the Carolina Railroad Company and the Norfolk Southern Railway Company 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 35 

be, and they are hereby ordered and directed to put in force on or before 
January 25, 1927, rate of thirty-six and half (36%) cents per hundred on 
gasoline, in tank cars, carload minimum "shell capacity of tank, from Wil- 
mington, N. C, to Snow Hill, N. C. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self. 

This 4th day of January, 1927. Clerk. 

EASTERN CAROLINA WHOLESALE DEALERS & MANUFACTURERS 
ASSOCIATION, v. NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Order 

This is a complaint of unreasonableness of rates on empty truck barrels 
from Beaufort and New Bern, N. C, to Morehead City, N. C. Hearing was 
held in Raleigh February 8, 1927. The rate being charged at present is $19.00 
per car, 10,000 lbs., from both points to Morehead City. The North Carolina 
Exception Sheet provides for sixth class rating on empty truck barrels, car- 
load 10.000 lbs. minimum, and the application of this Exception Sheet would 
make the rates to Morehead City from Beaufort 8y 2 cents, from New Bern 10 
cents per 100 lbs., or $8.50 per car from Beaufort and $16 per car from 
New Bern. 

During the administration of the Director General of Railroads there was 
put into effect throughout Southern territory a minimum line of class rates, 
governed by the straight Southern Classification rating, regardless of ratings 
named in the Exception Sheet. Empty truck barrels, carload, in Southern 
Classification take third class rating and the 3rd class minimum rate in the 
scale referred to above is 19 cents per 100 lbs. 

Both the Atlantic Coast Line and Norfolk Southern have in commodity 
rates in certain cases to apply on empty truck packages from manufacturing 
points to points of consumption, while the plant at Morehead City is com- 
pelled to pay regular class rates and in this instance class rate which is. in 
the opinion of the Commission, unreasonable especially for short distances. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Norfolk Southern be, and it is hereby 
directed to put in force on March 15, 1927, rate on empty truck barrels, car- 
load, to Morehead City, N. C, from Beaufort, N. C, $15.00 from New Bern, 
N. C, $16.00 per car of 10,000 lbs., excess weight to be charged for in pro- 
portion. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self. 

This 9th day of February, 1927. Clerk. 

ORNAMENTAL STONE COMPANY, THROUGH W. S. CREIGHTON, TRAF- 
FIC MANAGER, CHARLOTTE, N. C, V. ATLANTIC & YADKIN RAIL- 
WAY COMPANY (A. E. Smith and J. W. Fry. Receivers), ATLANTIC 
COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPANY, CAROLINA & NORTHWESTERN 
RAILWAY COMPANY, CLINCHFIELD RAILROAD, NORFOLK & WEST- 
ERN RAILWAY, NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY. SEA- 
BOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY COMPANY, SOUTHERN RAILWAY COM- 
PANY, WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND RAILWAY COMPANY. 

Order 
This case was heard at Raleigh. November 18. 1926. Evidence at the 
hearing disclosed the following: Complainants having established a plant 
for manufacturing artificial stone, at Charlotte, began shipping stone some- 



36 N. C. Corporation Commission 

thing like four years ago under class rates then in effect and are now asking 
for commodity rates lower than class rates upon the ground that there are 
commodity rates in effect from Richmond, Va., and other interstate points 
into North Carolina on a lower level than they are paying within the State. 
Reparation is asked for on shipments moving since August 6, 1926, the date 
of their complaint, based upon rates which this Commission may find reason- 
able in this case. Complainants also allege that they are entitled to have 
rates made the same as on natural stone and in fact they feel that the present 
natural building stone rates should be recognized as covering their stone since 
the natural stone tariffs do not distinguish between the classes of building 
stone, that is, the tariffs do not specify artificial or natural but simply cover 
"stone." Moreover, they say, that Indiana limestone with which their greatest 
competition exists is being brought into the State and reworked and reshipped 
under the natural stone rates. 

Carriers do not deny that complainants are entitled to a readjustment of 
their rates, but contend that the natural stone rates are too low even for 
natural stone and indicate that they will within a reasonably short time make 
application to our Commission to revise the natural stone rates, and will at 
that time propose a line of rates to apply uniformly both on natural as well 
as artificial stone. The carriers propose in this case that we adopt for use 
within North Carolina the same scale of rates on artificial stone in carloads 
as in effect between Richmond, Va., and points in North Carolina at this 
time, and state that if this is done they will recommend to their respective 
traffic people that the rates so ordered by the Commission be applied from 
Charlotte to North Carolina points since August 6, 1926, the date of complaint. 

Unquestionably rates now being charged complainants are too high and out 
of line with other stone rates, however, these are class rates and as such 
were made and put in force by state authorities and while this Commission 
also made the commodity rates on natural stone now in force, we did not 
have in mind at the time the making of rates on artificial stone but only on 
natural stone. Moreover, until this complaint reached us we were not 
informed that there was artificial stone being manufactured, or shipped 
between points within our State. In the meantime, rates on artificial stone 
in carloads from Richmond, Va., and other interstate origin points to points 
within the State, which are higher than natural stone rates within the State, 
were installed. These rates are in effect at this time and evidence in this case 
shows there is a movement of stone under these rates, therefore it will be 
apparent that if we should order the present class rates on artificial stone 
reduced to commodity rates upon a level with natural stone rates we would 
be relieving discrimination within the State and at the same time at least 
raising a question of discrimination against interstate traffic. 

It would, therefore, seem that the reasonable thing to be done in this case 
is to provide rates which are more reasonable than in effect at this time, and 
while these rates may not entirely relieve the discrimination complained of 
in that they are not on a parity with the rates on natural stone, they will 
give the complainant considerable relief and we feel will assure refund to 
basis of these rates on shipments already moved since August 6, 1926. 

Rates which we will authorize should be considered as temporary pending 
the time when the application of the carriers may be received when the whole 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 



37 



body of stone rates can be reviewed and the advisability determined as to 
placing rates on both artificial and natural stone upon an exact parity as to 
rate levels. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the 

Atlantic & Yadkin Railway Company 
(A. E. Smith and J. W. Fry, Receivers) 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company 

Carolina & Northwestern Railway Company 

Clinchfield Railroad 

Norfolk & Western Railway Company 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company 

Southern Railway Company 

Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company 
be and they are hereby ordered and directed to put in force on April 25, 1927, 
rates on artificial building stone, in carloads, as per Descriptions A, B, and C, 
below, the following scales of rates both single and joint line, as indicated, 
in cents per ton of 2,000 pounds : 





DESCRIPTION "A" 


DESCRIPTION "B" 


DESCRIPTION "C" 


Miles 
















Single Line 


Joint Line 


Single Line 


Joint Line 


Single Line 


Joint Line 


5 


90 




130 




180 




10 


100 


150 


140 


190 


190 


240 


15 


110 


160 


140 


200 


200 


250 


20 


110 


160 


140 


200 


200 


250 


25 


120 


170 


150 


210 


210 


260 


30 


120 


170 


150 


210 


210 


260 


35 


130 


180 


160 


220 


220 


270 


40 


130 


180 


160 


220 


220 


270 


45 


140 


190 


170 


230 


230 


280 


50 


140 


190 


170 


230 


230 


280 


55 


140 


200 


180 


230 


230 


290 


60 


140 


200 


180 


230 


230 


290 


65 


150 


200 


190 


230 


240 


290 


70 


150 


200 


190 


230 


240 


290 


75 


160 


210 


200 


240 


250 


300 


80 


160 


210 


200 


240 


250 


300 


85 


170 


220 


210 


250 


260 


310 


90 


170 


220 


210 


250 


260 


310 


95 


180 


230 


220 


260 


270 


320 


100 


180 


230 


220 


260 


270 


320 


110 


190 


230 


230 


270 


280 


320 


120 


200 


240 


230 


280 


290 


330 


130 


210 


250 


240 


290 


300 


340 


140 


220 


260 


250 


300 


310 


350 


150 


230 


270 


260 


310 


320 


360 


160 


230 


280 


270 


320 


320 


370 


170 


240 


280 


280 


320 


330 


370 


180 


250 


290 


290 


320 


340 


380 


190 


260 


300 


300 


330 


350 


390 


200 


270 


310 


310 


340 


360 


400 


210 


280 


320 


320 


350 


370 


410 


220 


290 


320 


320 


360 


380 


410 



38 



N. C. Corporation Commission 





DESCRIPTION "A" 


DESCRIPTION "B" 


DESCRIPTION "C" 


Miles 
















Single Line 


Joint Line 


Single Line 


Joint Line 


Single Line 


Joint Line 


220 


280 


320 


320 


350 


380 


410 


230 


300 


330 


330 


370 


390 


420 


240 


310 


340 


340 


380 


400 


430 


250 


320 


350 


350 


390 


410 


440 


260 


320 


360 


360 


400 


410 


450 • 


270 


340 


370 


380 


400 


430 


460 


280 


340 


370 


380 


400 


430 


460 


290 


360 


390 


400 


410 


450 


480 


300 


360 


390 


400 


410 


450 


480 


310 


380 


410 


410 


440 


470 


500 


320 


380 


410 


410 


440 


470 


500 


330 


400 


420 


430 


460 


490 


510 


340 


400 


420 


430 


460 


490 


510 


350 


410 


440 


450 


480 


500 


530 


360 


410 


440 


450 


480 


500 


530 


370 


430 


450 


470 


490 


520 


540 


380 


430 


450 


470 


490 


520 


540 


390 


450 


470 


490 


500 


540 


560 



Description A — Building blocks, plain faced, not in imitation of chiseled, 
dressed hammered, or sandrubbed natural stone, loose or in packages, carload 
minimum weight 36,000 pounds. 

Description B- — Blocks, pieces of slabs, N. O. I. B. N., moulded in imitation 
of chiseled, dressed, hammered or sandrubbed natural stone, loose or in pack- 
ages, carload minimum weight 36,000 pounds. 

Description C — Blocks, pieces or slabs, N. O. I. B. N., moulded in imitation 
of carved lettered or traced natural stone, packed in excelsior, hay, straw, or 
similar packing material or in packages, carload minimum 36,000 pounds. 

Blocks, pieces or slabs, N. O. I. B. N., in slabs or pieces in boxes or crates, 
or with finished surfaces protected by boxing or crating securely strapped to 
each piece, carload minimum weight 36,000 pounds. 

Miles — Miles are shown for 5 miles and under, 10 miles and over 5, 15 
miles and over 10, etc., through the scale. 

Applicable to common carriers in Groups "A", "B" and "C." (See Circu- 
lars Nos. 252 and 253. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 25th day of March, 1927. Clerk. 



EQUITABLE FREIGHT ADJUSTMENT BUREAU, PATTON PACKAGE 
COMPANY, CORBETT PACKAGE COMPANY, MOUNT OLIVE MANU- 
FACTURING COMPANY, v. ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD COM- 
PANY AND ALL OTHER COMMON CARRIERS BY RAIL WITHIN THE 
STATE. 

Order 
Rates on Fruit or Berry Crates, and Vegetable Baskets or Hampers, in 
Straight or Mixed Carloads, between Points in North Carolina. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 39 

Hearing in the above matter was held at the office of the Commission, in 
Raleigh, March 22, 1927, each of the complainants, except the Equitable 
Freight Adjustment Bureau, have manufacturing plants on the Atlantic Coast 
Line Railroad. The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad has mileage commodity 
rates on these commodities published to apply locally on their line per carload 
of 15,000 lbs., excess weight to be charged for in proportion, and these rates 
are not subject to the usual 25% deduction in making joint rates with other 
lines. 

On shipments destined to points on other lines charges have usually been 
arrived at by applying the Atlantic Coast Line commodity rate per car, as 
before referred to. plus Class A rate, less 25% beyond the junction. It is 
clear that the Southern Classification provides for Class A rates to apply on 
these commodities. Some two years ago the carriers issued an exception to 
i the Southern Classification which claimants are contending includes these 
commodities in the lumber list, and at the lumber rate, with carload minimum 
weight of 30,000 lbs. There can be no question but that vegetable hampers 
are included in this list, but there is some doubt that the item referred to 
therein as berry -boxes would properly cover berry crates. In any event the 
whole rate structure on these commodities has become so confused that it 
appears neither the shippers or carriers' agents understand the proper appli- 
cation of rates and shippers are seeking to have the Corporation Commission 
plarify this situation and appear to prefer that the lumber rates be marie 
j pplicable to these commodities, subject however to a minimum carload weight 
of 24.000 lbs., which is the lumber minimum within the State. It is generally 
admitted the commodities will not load more than about 15.000 to 21.000 lbs. 
per car, depending upon size of the car. Carriers are opposed to a reduction 
in the minimum and contend that these commodities were included in the 
lumber list through error. 

The Commission is of the opinion and so finds that there should be through 
reasonable rates on these commodities, and 

It is Therefore Ordered, that each and every common carrier by rail 
within the State is hereby ordered and directed to put in force on April 8, 
1927, the following mileage rates on fruit or berry crates, set up. (with inside 
carriers and separators) and vegeable baskets or hampers (nested* in straight 
or mixed carloads 15.000 lbs. minimum, in cents per 100 pounds, (subject to 
minimum carload charre of $15.00 per car) : 

Miles Standard Single Line Standard Joint Line 

5 miles and under 6 

7 miles and over 5 7% 

10 miles and over 7 7 s% 

12 miles and over 10 7 9% 

15 miles and over 12 7% 10 

17 miles and over 15 7% 10 

20 miles and over 17 9 11 % 

22 miles and over 20 9 ni/~ 

25 miles and over 22 9 jji 



11% 
11% 

li% 

li y 2 



27 miles and over 25 9 

30 miles and over 27 10 

32 miles and over 30 10 13 

35 miles and over 32 10% 13% 

37 miles and over 35 10% 13% 

40 miles and over 37 11% 14^ 



40 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



Miles 


S 


andard Sin 


42 miles and over 


40 


11 % 


45 miles and over 


42 


ny 2 


47 miles and over 


45 


11% 


50 miles and over 


47 


iiy 2 


52 miles and over 


50 


ny 2 


55 miles and over 


52 


n% 


57 miles and over 


55 


uy 2 


60 miles and over 


57 


13 


62 miles and over 


60 


13 


65 miles and over 


62 


13 


67 miles and over 


65 


13 


70 miles and over 


67 


13 


72 miles and over 


70 


13 


75 miles and over 


72 


13% 


77 miles and over 


75 


18% 


80 miles and over 


77 


18% 


82 miles and over 


80 


13% 


85 miles and over 


82 


13% 


87 miles and over 


85 


13% 


90 miles and over 


87 


13% 


92 miles and over 


90 


13% 


95 miles and over 


92 


14% 


97 miles and over 


95 


14% 


100 miles and over 


97 


14% 


110 miles and over 


100 


14% 


120 miles and over 


110 


14% 


130 miles and over 


120 


14% 


140 miles and over 


130 


14% 


150 miles and over 


140 


15% 


160 miles and over 


150 


15% 


170 miles and over 


160 


16% 


180 miles and over 


170 


16% 


190 miles and over 


180 


17% 


200 miles and over 


190 


17% 


210 miles and over 


200 


18% 


220 miles and over 


210 


18% 


230 miles and over 


220 


19% 


240 miles and over 


230 


19% 


250 miles and over 


240 


20% 


260 miles and over 


250 


20% 


270 miles and over 


260 


21% 


280 miles and over 


270 


21% 


290 miles and over 


280 


22% 


300 miles and over 


290 


22% 



14% 

14% 

14% 

14% 

14% 

14% 

14% 

15% 

16 

16 

16 

16 

16 

16% 

16% 

16% 

16% 

16% 

16% 

16% 

16% 

17 

17 

17 

17 

17 

17 

17% 

18 

18 

19 

19 

20 

20 

21 

21 

22 

22 

23 

23 

24 

24 

26 

26 



Standard line scales applies for account of Carriers in Groups A and B, as 
shown in Circulars Nos. 252 and 253. 

Rates for account of Norfolk Southern Railroad shall be one and half cents 
per 100 lbs. higher than standard lines rates. Rates for account of short 
lines less than 75 miles in length shall be three cents per 100 lbs. higher than 
rates for other carriers. 

It is Therefore Ordered, that these rates shall take precedence over either 
class or commodity rates now applicable on these commodities. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 29th day of March, 1937. Clerk. 



Decisions and Adjustments op Complaints 41 

IN THE MATTER OF APPLICATION OF NEW HOLLAND CORPORA- 
TION FOR LICENSE TO BECOME LIMITED COMMON CARRIER FOR 
HANDLING FREIGHT AND PASSENGER TRAFFIC. 

Order 

This application of the New Holland Corporation recites it is a corporation 
duly created and organized under the laws of the State of Delaware, being 
authorized to do business in North Carolina under its laws, for the purpose 
of developing a large area of land in Hyde County, which is located great 
distances from rail or water transportation; that the development of said 
land requires the operation of a large pumping plant by steam power, and 
this requires a large quantity of coal; that the North Carolina Farms Com- 
pany originally constructed a railroad primarily for the purpose of trans- 
porting coal to the pumping plant at New Holland; that the New Holland 
Corporation has now rebuilt the line of railroad which was formerly known 
as New Holland, Higginsport & Mt. Vernon Railroad, a line of standard gauge 
railroad running from Wenona, in Washington County, where it connects 
with the Norfolk Southern, to New Holland, in Hyde County; petitioners 
further say New Holland Corporation finds it necessary to cut and manufac- 
ture standing timber into lumber and they anticipate the necessity of con- 
ducting a sawmill; and that for this and other purposes the petitioners find 
it necessary to maintain and operate the above line of railroad ; petitioners 
further recite there is no railroad operating in Hyde County and frequently 
requests have been made that they render such transportation facilities for 
the benefit of the general public as it is equipped to render by transporting 
passengers and commodities for the farmers and general public of the county. 

The Commission finds the operation of this railroad as a limited common 
carrier would be in the public interest, and 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the New Holland Corporation be and the 
same is hereby authorized and directed to operate a standard gauge railroad 
between Wenona, in Washington County, and New Holland, in Hyde County, 
as a limited common carrier for the purpose set forth in the preamble of this 
order, and that rates for handling freight, as shown in Local Freight Tariff 
accompanying petitioners' application be, and the same are hereby approved 
subject to our usual rule of reviewal upon complaint, effective April 25, 1927. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Se:lf, 

This 21st day of April, 1927. Clerk. 

IN RE APPLICATION OF THE SOUTHERN RAILWAY FOR AUTHOR- 
ITY TO CHANGE THE LOCATION OF THE ASHEVILLE FREIGHT 
STATION FROM ITS PRESENT LOCATION TO A POINT BELOW BILT- 
MORE, KNOWN AS BILTMORE BOTTOMS, AND TO ABANDON THE 
PRESENT STATION. 

Order 

This is a petition of the Southern Railway for authority to relocate the 
freight station at Asheville. The petitioner in this proceeding operates three 
rail lines into and through the City of Asheville and maintains a large yard 
and transfer warehouses for the large territory served at this point. 



42 N. C. Corporation Commission 

The Commission had its inspector make an investigation of the yard, ware- 
house and transfer facilities at Asheville during the summer of 1923, report 
of the results of this investigation being made to the Commission under date 
of November 1, 1923. This report was submitted in evidence at the hearing 
in Asheville on April 11, 1927, and by motion was made a part of the record 
in the case. We quote from the report, as follows : 

"During a period of three days, 112 merchandise package cars were 
placed at warehouse for unloading and transferring. I find that these 
cars stood on the yard an average of forty-three hours per car before 
they were placed for unloading. During the same period ninety-nine cars 
were loaded at warehouse for forwarding. I find that these cars were 
on the yard an average of ten hours per car before being forwarded. 
This condition is due to insufficient car space at warehouse, which makes 
it necessary for cars to await their turn to be worked or transferred. 
An average of forty-one cars, as stated above, are received per day, while 
the car capacity of the warehouse is only thirty-six cars. This indicates 
that five cars more are received per clay than can be handled. 

"There were twenty-seven more cars received during a period of eleven 
days than were forwarded, seven of these cars were received after 7 :00 
A. M., October twelfth ; the remaining twenty were received prior to 
7 :00 A. M., October twelfth. The seven cars arriving after 7 :00 A. M. 
could not be placed for unloading before October thirteenth, which would 
result in a twelve-hour delay to these cars. The remaining twenty cars 
were delayed for a much longer period." 

This report was transmitted to the General Manager of the Southern Rail- 
way on November 7, 1923, who replied that they were not unmindful of the 
conditions referred to at Asheville and that they were undertaking to work 
out a plan by which they could give better facilities at this point and assured 
the Commission that this would be done at the earliest possible moment. 

The Commission's inspector visited Asheville from time to time after the 
original investigation was made to ascertain if certain recommendations in 
regard to such improvements as could be made with the existing facilities 
had been complied with. A conference was held between representatives of 
the Commission and the petitioner in January, 1924, and it was the general 
opinion that the present facilities would not warrant the expenditure of 
money necessary to attempt to provide improved facilities to meet the grow- 
ing demand, and that in all probability a relocation of the station at some 
other point where a greater car capacity could be obtained would be neces- 
sary. At that time the petitioner was beginning its work of yard extension 
eastward to a point near Biltmore on property which it had purchased for 
such track extension when necessary. 

The report, referred to above, which reflected the inadequacy of the pre en t 
facilities, was made approximately four years ago and it is reasonable to 
assume that with the growth of the city and that section of the State that 
conditions there have not only not improved, but with the increased volume 
of business, have grown steadily worse. The City of Asheville is a rapidly 
growing city. The increase in population is bringing industry there, and 
improvements made at the present time should be made with a view to ade- 
quate service for a much larger city than we have at present. 

The people in the vicinity of the present station are opposing the removal! 
vigorously, principally for, the reason that it will necessitate their hauling 
their less-carload freight something like two miles farther, both for shipment 



Decisions and Adjustments op Complaints 43 

and for delivery to their wholesale houses. The only protests to the granting 
of the application have been registered by people having their places of busi- 
ness located adjacent to the present station. 

The distance from the proposed location to Pack Square, in the main busi- 
ness section of the city, is only about two-tenths of a mile farther than from 
the present location ; and it was brought out in the evidence before the Com- 
mission at the hearing that about 57.8 per cent of the freight tonnage to 
Asheville went up town and that only about 5 per cent of it was handled by 
consignees in the vicinity of the present station not served by tracks. Streets 
have been, and are being, paved which make the proposed location easy of 
access ; and distance over paved streets with trucks and automobiles counts 
for but little. At the time the present station was built, it was almost 
impossible to travel through the streets of some of our principal cities ; under 
those conditions, distance did count. 

It is important to the City of Asheville and to Western North Carolina that 
the Southern Railway be permitted to build at such place as will best serve 
the interests of the city and that section ; and what best serves the city and 
community cannot possibly operate greatly to the disadvantage of anyone. 
We are convinced that public convenience and necessity demand that the 
Southern Railway be permitted to relocate the station and we are of the 
opinion that the proposed site serves this interest to a greater extent than 
any other point adjacent to the present yard limits ; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be granted. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 9th day of May, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6519. 

STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION V. COMMON CARRIERS BY RAIL 
WITHIN THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 

Rates on Crushed Stone, Sand, Gravel, etc., in Carloads, Between Points 
in North Carolina. 

This complaint of the State Highway Commission, through Chairman 
Frank Page, dated April 21, 1927, calls attention of the Corporation Commis- 
sion to decision of the Interstate Commerce Commission in its Docket No. 
17517, decided January 21, 1927, establishing effective June 1, 1927, certain 
scales of mileage rates on crushed stone, sand, gravel and slag, in carloads, 
for uniform application over standard lines from Montgomery, Ala., and 
Chattanooga, Tenn., to destination in Georgia and Mississippi ; between points 
within the State of Georgia and between points in Georgia and other points 
in Southern territory, except Florida, and urges this Commission to author- 
ize these new scales of rates for application on intrastate traffic within 
North Carolina. Rates for so-called short or weak lines are provided for 
arbitrarily higher than the standard lines. 

Copy of the complaint was duly served upon the carriers as is the Com- 
mission's usual custom, and hearing was ordered and held at Raleigh, May 18, 
1927. The State Highway Commission made no contention that the present 
road building material rates are excessive, or unreasonable, but based its con- 
tention for application of the new scales upon the belief that if the new 
scales were reasonable for other Southern States the same rates should 
likewise be reasonable for North Carolina. 



44 N. C. Corporation Commission 

A majority of the standard lines of the State expressed a willingness to 
have the new scales made effective within the State with the understanding 
the new rates were not to become effective until August 1, 1927, on which 
date it appeared in evidence at the hearing the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission had now determined these new rates should be made effective in- 
stead of June 1, 1927, as originally ordered. 

The application of the new scales within North Carolina will result in 
both reductions and increases compared with rates now in effect. For in- 
stance, for distances up to 230 miles there will be reductions for single 
line hauls on an average of seven cents, and for joint line hauls an aver- 
age of ten cents per ton. For distances 230 to 450 miles there will be in- 
creases for single line hauls an average of six cents and on joint line hauls 
three cents per ton. When considering the entire scale for distances up 
to 450 miles there will be an average reduction in single line hauls of two 
cents, joint line hauls five cents per ton. 

The Seaboard Air Line Railway expressed objection to the new scales 
upon the grounds they are, in their opinion, improperly graded. The Nor- 
folk Southern expressed objection upon the grounds its line is not located 
within the territory where the Interstate Commerce Commission found the 
new scales to be reasonable, and upon the further grounds that that Company 
is not in position to stand a reduction in road building material rates. 
While the so-called short or weak lines, that is lines under 75 miles in 
length, were not represented at the hearing, the Commission has since the 
hearing submitted the question by mail to them and a large majority of 
those heard from are agreeable to the new proposed basis for short line rates. 

The Commission is of the opinion, and so finds that the new scales of 
rates as found reasonable by the Interstate Commerce Commission, for 
application in the Southeastern territory generally will likewise be reason- 
able maximum rates for application within this State. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That common carriers by rail within the State 
be, and they are hereby ordered and directed to put in force on August 1, 
1927, the following maximum scales of rates on marble, granite and stone 
(crushed or rubble), stone screeings, gravel (washed), slag, chert, cinders, 
and sand, in straight or mixed carloads, carload minimum weight 90 per 
cent marked capacity of car, except when cars are loaded to their visible 
capacity the actual weight will govern, per ton of 2,000 pounds : 

Distances 

10 miles and under 

20 miles and over 

30 miles and over 

40 miles and over 

60 miles and over 

80 miles and over 
100 miles and over 
125 miles and over 
150 miles and over 
175 miles and over 
200 miles and over 
230 miles and over 
260 miles and over 
290 miles and over 
320 miles and over 
360 miles and over 
400 miles and over 
440 miles and over 
480 miles and over 





Single Line 


Joint Line 




50 


65 


10 


55 


70 


20 


60 


75 


30 


70 


85 


40 


80 


95 


60 


90 


105 


80 


100 


115 


100 


110 


125 


125 


120 


135 


150 


130 


140 


175 


135 


145 


200 


140 


150 


230 


150 


160 


260 


160 


170 


290 


165 


175 


320 


175 


180 


360 


185 


190 


400 


195 


200 


440 


205 


210 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 45 

When the transportation is in whole or in part over either of the so-called 
short lines, that is independent lines under 75 miles in length, rates are to 
be determined as follows : Apply the rates applicable under appropriate 
scale or scales above set forth plus the following arbitrary which is to 
accrue solely to the short line. Arbitrary twenty-five cents per net ton. 
(See Circulars Nos. 252 and 253). 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self. 

This 4th day of June, 1927. Clerk. 

NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION COMMISSION V. COMMON CAR- 
RIERS WITHIN THE STATE. 
Rates fob Transportation of Peaches, in Carloads, Intrastate Within 

North Carolina. 

This is a case brought by the Commission on its own motion to investigate 
rates on peaches, in carloads, between points within the State. At the 
present time the regular second-class rates with a carload minimum weight 
of 20,000 pounds are applicable on peaches within the State, and the Com- 
missioner has from time to time received complaints indicating the belief, 
on the part of shippers, that the current rates are unreasonably high. Hearing 
in the matter was ordered and held at the office of the Commission in 
Raleigh, March 22, 1927. 

The carriers represented at the hearing took the position that the subject 
of peach rates was now before both the carriers and the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission, the principal case being rates from the Sandhill section 
of the State to Eastern markets and that the results in that case might 
have great bearing upon the question of intrastate rates in North Carolina. 
The Corporation Commission was therefore urged to take no action in the 
matter at this time pending the settlement of the interstate adjustment. 
Upon intimation by. the Commission that we would not consider passing this 
peach shipping season without an adjustment of peach rates within the 
State, the carriers submitted a proposal which would if adopted by us make 
some modification in present rates in that the proposal would reduce the 
rates from second to approximately third class rates. The proposal, how- 
ever, contemplates the publication of specific rates between given points 
rather than a mileage scale to apply between all points and this is unsatis- 
factory to the Commission ; moreover, the proposed rates are not in the 
Commission's opinion, as low as should be authorized. The peach industry 
in this State has, as is well-known, grown to be one of the important per- 
ishable farm products of the State. In other States such as California and 
Georgia, also in the Southwest, where peaches are extensively grown, local 
distributive rates are provided which recognize the necessity of encouraging 
home consumption of this important agricultural product, as well as reason- 
able interstate rates to the larger centers of population. 

The Commission is of the opinion, and so finds, that present rates on peaches, 
in carloads, between points within the State are unreasonably high for free 
movement of this commodity. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the common Carriers within the State be, 
and they are hereby ordered and directed to make effective within the State 
on June 25, 1927, rates on peaches, fresh, in standard bushel baskets, boxes 
or crates, carload minimum weight 20,000 pounds, fourth class rates. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 6th day of June, 1927. Clerk. 



46 N. C. CoRroRATiON Commission 

IN RE PETITION OF TOWNS OF SPENCER AND EAST SPENCER TO 
REQUIRE THE SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY TO CONSTRUCT AN 
UNDERPASS BETWEEN SPENCER AND EAST SPENCER. 

Order 

In the above-entitled matter, the Corporation Commission entered an order, 
bearing date of January 2, 1925, requiring, under authority of a special act 
of the General Assembly, Special Session of 1924, the Southern Railway Com- 
pany to construct an underpass at a point about four hundred feet north 
of Depot Street ; and it now appearing that the said order and special act 
under which the said order was made have been held to be invalid ; and it 
appearing that the Towns of Spencer and East Spencer, the Board of Com- 
missioners of Rowen County and the Southern Railway Company have 
entered into an agreement, bearing date of June 17, 1927, and that under 
the terms of this agreement the Southern Railway Company agrees to con- 
struct an overhead bridge at a point about sixteen hundred feet northeast 
of Depot Street at the point where Andrews Street, if projected from the 
south, would cross the right-of-way of the Southern Railway Company, and 
also to construct an overhead pedestrian way at Depot Street, and to move 
the depot of the Southern Railway Company from its present location to a 
point near the location of the proposed overhead bridge and on the east 
side thereof ; it is, therefore 

Ordered, That the agreement herein referred to between the Towns of 
Spencer, East Spencer, the Board of Commissioners of Rowan County and 
the Southern Railway Company of June 17, 1927, be, and it is hereby, ap- 
proved and authority for the removing and relocation of the depot in ac- 
cordance with the terms of this agreement is granted. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 21st day of July, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 5500. 

IN THE MATTER OF CAROLINA IRON AND STEEL COMPANY V. COM- 
MON CARRIERS BY RAIL. CLASSIFICATION OF STEEL BAR SASH, 
LOOSE, LESS CARLOAD, BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

Hearing in the above case was held at Raleigh, July 20, 1927. Complain- 
ants are jobbers of steel bar sash at Greensboro, North Carolina. This com- 
modity is received by them in both carloads and less carloads from eastern 
manufacturing points, principally Philadelphia, Pa., and is reshipped from 
Greensboro to points within the State. Complaint is made that the second- 
class rating on steel bar sash, loose, less carload, is unreasonably high when 
compared with wooden sash, which takes fourth-class rating when boxed, 
crated or cleated. Steel bar sash is shipped without glass, while the wooden 
sash usually contains glass. 

Carriers contend the second-class rating is reasonable for steel bar sash, 
loose, less carload, and say they understand fourth-class rating will properly 
apply if the steel bar sash is crated, boxed, or otherwise protected in the 
same manner as wooden sash. The Commission finds that steel bar sash is 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 47 

a more valuable article than wooden sash, and that while there may be some 
competition between the two kinds of sash, this feature was not particularly 
stressed by complainants. 

The Commission further finds that steel bar sash, loose, less carload, is 
moving in interstate commerce into the State at the second-class rating, 
which is the same as now applied between points within the State, and if we 
should change the classification to fourth-class, this would create a discrim- 
ination against interstate commerce, which under the circumstances the 
Commission finds would not be justified. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the complaint in this case be, and the same 
is hereby ordered dismissed. 

By direction of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 8th day of August, 1927. Clerk, 

APPLICATION OF THE ATLANTIC AND YADKIN RAILWAY, (A. E. 
SMITH AND J. W. FRY, RECEIVERS), FOR DISCONTINUANCE OF 
PASSENGER TRAINS NOS. 32 AND 33. 

Order 

Application of Atlantic and Yadkin Railway, (A. E. Smith and J. W. 
Fry. Receivers), through Superintendent Sydnor de Butts, for approval of 
the Corporation Commission to discontinue passenger trains Nos. 32 and 33, 
operating between Mount Airy and Sanford, North Carolina. These trains 
carry passengers, and both mail and express, except that there is no express 
service on these trains between Sanford and Greensboro. Financial state- 
ment accompanying the application shows that for the month of May, 1927, 
the actual out-of-pocket cost of operating these trains, that is the amount 
paid out above the amount taken in, was $2,215.01. These figures do not 
take account of depreciation, or repairs to equipment. 

At the hearing, testimony was given showing the cost for the first four 
months of 1927 over and above the amount earned by these trains was 
$17,849.79. If the four months are representative the annual loss would 
amount to over $50,000.00. 

The earnings for these four months of 1927, viz : January, February, 
March and April were distributed as follows : 

Passenger $ 6,347.64 

Mail 3,953.68 

Express 3,452.04 

Baggage 88.22 

Total $13,841.59 

From the above figures it will be observed that revenue from express and 
mail is greater than from passengers. The total expense covering this period 
is given as $31,691.38. 

The removal of these trains is opposed by citizens and organizations of 
practically all towns and communities along the line of road from Sanford 
to Mount Airy upon the general grounds that discontinuance of the service 
will injure the business and commercial development of the communities. The 
strongest opposition comes from Mount Airy, whose business interests com- 
plain that the discontinuance of these trains will destroy the produce business 



48 N. C. Corporation Commission 

which is of important proportions and is done by express carried by these 
trains ; also the importance of handling mail by these trains is urged. 

A considerable number of business interests of Mount Airy wrote letters 
advocating the removal of these trains in justice, as they say, to the Atlantic 
and Yadkin Railway, and its receivers. 

The Commission is of the opinion, and so finds, that the evident increase 
in the use by citizens of the hard surface roads which practically parallel 
this line of railroad has caused the passenger revenues from these trains to 
shrink so far below the actual cost of operation, amounting in round figures 
to $50,000.00 per annum, as renders it unreasonable to require the continued 
operation of these trains. However, it would be unreasonable to deprive 
Mount Airy business interests of the express service of these trains without 
the inauguration of some service to handle the produce business by express, 
and mail service along the line should likewise be given some consideration. 

Ordered, That the Atlantic and Yadkin Railway (A. E. Smith and J. W. 
Fry, Receivers) be and it is hereby authorized and directed to discontinue 
Trains 32 and 33. 

Further Ordered, That simultaneously with the discontinuance of these 
trains the said Atlantic and Yadkin Railway, (A. E. Smith and J. W. Fry, 
Receivers), be and it is hereby ordered to inaugurate through freight train 
service, said train to leave Greensboro in the morning approximately 10 :00 
A. M., and leave Mount Airy in the afternoon, approximately 4:00 P. M., 
which is intended to take the place of the express service upon Trains 32 
and 33. 

It is Further Ordered, That the Atlantic and Yadkin Railway (A. E. 
Smith and J. W. Fry, Receivers) place one empty car, suitable for express 
shipments, at the platform at Mount Airy each morning for the reception 
of express matter, and that said express car be moved to Greensboro upon the 
freight train leaving Mount, "Aairy approximately 4:00 P. M., and that the 
said express car be so handled at the Greensboro terminal as to insure 
prompt express service upon Mount Airy shipments. 

It is Further Ordered, That the above changes shall be made when the 
Federal Government has provided mail service whereby the morning mail 
from the north and south at Greensboro formerly handled by Train 32 will 
be handled into Mount Airy, and intermediate stations, by star route, 
reaching there no later than the said Train 32 schedule at this time ; and star 
route service inaugurated between Greensboro and Sanford. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 12th day of August, 1927. Clerk. 

IN RE PASSENGER LIABILITY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE INSURANCE 

ENDORSEMENT. 

Order 

The Commission having under consideration Section 6, Chapter 136, Public 
Laws of 1927, known as the insurance section of the bus law, it is 

Ordered, That the following prescribed endorsement shall be made a part 
of all public liability and property damage insurance policies filed by motor 



Decisions and Adjustments op Complaints 49 

vehicle operators holding franchise certificates under Chapter 136, Public 
Laws of 1927: 

No condition, provision, stipulation, or limitation contained in the 
policy to which this endorsement is attached or any endorsement thereon, 
nor the violation of any of the same by the assured shall affect in any 
way the right of any person injured in his person or property by reason 
of an act of negligence arising from the operation by the assured of any 
motor vehicle insured hereunder, nor relieve the company from liability 
for the payment to such person of any judgment to the extent and in 
the amount set forth in the policy; but the assured hereby agrees to 
reimburse the company for any and all sums of money including loss, 
costs, expenses, and disbursements of every kind which it may pay as 
a result, direct or indirect, of the violation or breach of any of the 
conditions, provisions, stipulations, or limitations in the policy. 

The liability of the company for damage, to property is hereby extended 
to include damage to baggage in the custody of the assured and loss of 
baggage when checked by the assured : Provided, however, that the com- 
pany's liability under this paragraph is limited to fifty ($50) dollars for 
each piece of baggage. 

The insurance granted under this policy is hereby extended to cover 
any motor vehicle operated by the assured for the transportation of pas- 
sengers for compensation upon the route, or routes, designated in the fran- 
chise certificate issued by the Corporation Commission of North Carolina, 
whether such motor vehicle be specifically named, numbered, or desig- 
nated, in the policy or not and/or any motor vehicle, specifically named, 
numbered, or otherwise designated or described sufficiently for identifica- 
tion, operated by the assured while actually engaged in the transportation 
of passengers for compensation upon any of the public highways of the 
• State of North Carolina. 

The insolvency, or bankruptcy, of the assured shall not release the com- 
pany from the payment of such damages hereunder as would have been 
payable but for such insolvency, or bankruptcy ; and the prepayment of 
any judgment that may be recovered against the assured upon any claim 
covered by this policy is not a condition precedent to any right of action 
against the company upon this policy, but the company is bound to the ex- 
tent of its liability under the policy to pay and satisfy such judgment ; and 
an action may be maintained upon such judgment by the injured person, 
or his or her heirs or personal representatives, as the case may be, to en- 
force liability of the company as in this policy set forth and limited. 

The policy to which this endorsement is attached shall not be canceled 
until after ten days' notice, in writing, by the company, shall have first 
been given to the Corporation Commission of North Carolina at its office 
in Raleigh, North Carolina, the said ten days' notice to commence to run 
from the date of receipt of notice by the Commission. 

The foregoing endorsement shall be filed with, attached to, and made a 
part of all new insurance policies filed under the said chapter on and after 
January 1, 1928. It is further 

Ordered, That all insurance policies now on file with the North Carolina 
Corporation Commission in pursuance to Chapter 50, Public Laws of 1925, 
and Chapter 136, Public Laws of 1927, shall automatically expire on Janu- 
ary 31, 1928, unless the foregoing endorsement, bearing date of February 
1, 1928, is attached thereto and made a part thereof. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 6th day of December, 1927. Clerk. 



50 N. C. Corporation Commission 

W. L. COHOON, ELIZABETH CITY, N. C. V. COMMON CARRIERS BY 
RAIL IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

Rates on Ground Oyster Shells, Carload, Between Points in 
North Carolina 

This complaint was made verbally to the Commission October 20, 1927, 
and submitted to the carriers, in writing, the same day. Correspondence 
followed, the contents of which need not be repeated here. Hearing was 
held in the office of the Commission, December 8, 1927. 

The complaint alleges the complainant desires to ship ground oyster shells, 
carload, from Vandemere, N. C, to Sunbury, N. C, and is prohibited from 
doing so by the high rate of freight charges, and asks the Commission to 
order reasonable rate established. It appears in recent revision of rates on 
commercial fertilizer within the State, following similar revision in inter- 
state rates, ground oyster shells were included as one of the numerous 
commodities taking commercial fertilizer rates. This should not have been 
done, as it is conceded generally the commercial fertilizer rates are too 
high to apply on this cheap commodity. 

The carriers offered to publish a reduced rate from Vandemere to Sun- 
bury, which, they stated, was based upon their agricultural lime scale as 
it appeared to be their opinion the commodity the complainant desired to 
ship was nothing more nor less than agricultural lime. 

Mr. J. L. Burgess, Botanist for the North Carolina Department of Agri- 
culture, who for a long time has been interested in the introduction of the 
use of lime in farming operations, was present at the hearing. Upon being 
questioned by both sides to this controversy, stated, in substance, lime is a 
necessary ingredient to the well-being of the soil on farm lands in Eastern 
Carolina ; that lime necessary for the soil can be secured by the application 
of burnt lime, ground limestone, or ground oyster shells : that all three, 
it may be said, are one and the same thing insofar as results obtained ; 
that burnt lime, however, is considered a more valuable article, due solely 
to the fact of the cost of labor in burning and handling, and has always 
taken a higher rate of freight than either of the other commodities : that 
ground limestone and ground oyster shells are, therefore, in every respect, 
except in name only, one and the same commodity, having the same value, 
the same loading weight, the same transportation characteristics, that is. 
they are usually loaded in box cars, although it is stated they will not be 
damaged by water ; on the other hand, burnt lime will not stand being 
wet, and will not load as heavily as the other two commodities, and the 
value is approximately ten ($10.00) dollars per ton, while ground lime- 
stone and ground oyster shells each sell for approximately four ($4.00) 
per ton. 

The trunk line carriers of the State have in effect at present a single 
line mileage scale on ground limestone, carload, and in some instances a 
joint line scale on the same commodity : but the joint line scale is not ap- 
plicable generally, except over the Southern Railway and its affiliated lines, 
the lines of the Clinchfield and Norfolk Southern Railroads. These rates 
were all voluntarily established by the carriers several years ago, and re- 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 51 

ceived the regular increases during the war period, and the 10 per cent 
reduction in 1922. 

The Commission is of the opinion, and so finds, the present rates on 
ground oyster shells, carload, are unreasonable, and for the future rates 
will be unreasonable to the extent they exceed the single line rates and 
minimum weights now applied on ground limestone, carload, for single line 
movement : and that for the future rates on ground oyster shells, car- 
load, for joint line movement will be unreasonable to the extent they exceed 
the scale shown below, which is found to be reasonable for the joint 
movement by the trunk lines of the State, that is. lines having over sev- 
enty-five miles of line within North Carolina. 

It is Therefore Ordered. That the common Carriers by rail having over 
seventy-five miles of line within the State be, and they are hereby ordered 
and directed to apply on or before January 10. 1928. the following scale 
of rates, for joint movement over two or more lines, on ground oyster 
shells, carload minimum 67.000 pounds, in cents per ton of 2,000 pounds, 
as follows : 



Rate 



Miles 



Rate 





86 


180 miles and over 


150 


171 


5 


90 


210 miles and over 


180 


180 


10 


95 


255 miles and over 


210 


189 


15 


99 


280 miles and over 


255 


198 


20 


10S 


320 miles and over 


280 


203 


30 


117 


360 miles and over 


320 


214 


45 


126 


390 miles and over 


360 


225 


60 


135 


420 miles and over 


390 


237 


80 


144 


450 miles and over 


420 


248 


100 


153 


500 miles and over 


450 


270 


120 


162 









Miles 
5 miles and under 

10 miles and over 

15 miles and over 

20 miles and over 

30 miles and over 

45 miles and over 

60 miles and over 

80 miles and over 
100 miles and over 
120 miles and over 
150 miles and over 

For independent short lines having less than seventy-five miles of line 
within North Carolina, twenty-five cents per ton may be added to the above 
scale for joint application of rates in connection with the long lines, this 
arbitrary to accrue solely to the short lines in dividing. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self. 

This 23rd day of December. 1927. Clerk. 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE CITY OF RALEIGH. ET AL. V. 
SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY. SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 
COMPANY AND NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY. 



Order 

In this case the Chamber of Commerce and other civic organizations in 
the City of Raleigh seek to require the above-named railroad companies to 
construct a new union passenger depot in said city. There is some con- 
tention that a location at a point where Boylan Avenue crosses by over- 
head bridge the main tracks of these three companies would be a more 
practical location for such depot than the site now used for this purpose. 
but the contention in the main is that the present union depot is of ob- 
solete type and provides inadequate facilities, and that adequate facilities 
should be provided either at the present site or at the Boylan Avenue 
crossing. 



52 N, C. Corporation Commission 

The passenger depot now in use is owned jointly by the Southern Rail- 
way Company and the Seaboard Air Line Railway Company, and is used 
by the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company on a rental basis. 

The location of the present depot in proximity to the city is convenient 
to the traveling public, and from the one standpoint of number of seats 
for passengers, it is adequate. In no other respects does it meet the re- 
quirements that would be expected of a passenger depot serving three im- 
portant carriers in the City of Raleigh. 

According to testimony of respondents, the depot was constructed thirty- 
five years ago at a cost of $26,330, and seventeen years ago repairs and im- 
provements were made at a cost of $18,055. If depreciation had been set 
up against this structure at the nominal rate of 3 per cent per annum, 
the complete cost of the structure has been written off and represents no 
investment today. The lands occupied by it have a market value many 
times greater than cost and very much greater than estimated cost of ad- 
ditional lands necessary if a new depot should be constructed at the sug- 
gested site at Boylan Avenue. Carriers estimate the value of lands occu- 
pied by present depot at $187,675. Witnesses of petitioners estimate its 
present market value at $200,000, and estimate that the necessary additional 
lands at the proposed Boylan Avenue site can be secured for about $40,000. 

The present depot is of an obsolete type that involves unnecessary ex- 
pense of operation and unnecessary delay in operating trains to and from 
it. The three railroad lines converge at a point about three city blocks 
from the depot, at the point suggested for a new location, and all trains 
on each of these lines switch into the present depot from the main lines 
hy a back-in and head-out or a head-in and back-out operation. 

There are four tracks served by two concrete platforms eighteen feet 
eight inches wide. One of these narrow platforms has to accommodate the 
flow of passengers, baggage trucks, United States mail and express, flowing 
in opposite directions ; and on all trains that head into the station, the 
passengers in each direction have to run the gauntlet on one of these narrow 
platforms of moving and loaded trucks and of trucks being loaded and 
unloaded with mail, baggage and express in making their way in opposite 
directions between the passenger coaches and the depot. The passenger shed 
was constructed at a time when only small engines were used and pas- 
senger trains consisted only of three or four day coaches. The longer 
trains that now head into the station discharge passengers from their cars 
a long distance from the reach of the shed, in all kinds of weather, and 
in this respect the depot is admitted by respondent carriers to be inade- 
quate. 

The City of Raleigh does not have the benefit of passenger, mail and ex- 
press service on some of the most important trains operated through the 
city — the through New York-Florida trains of the Seaboard Air Line — and 
it is contended by the petitioners that this is on account of the loss of 
time that would be required for these fast, through trains to switch off 
their main line and back into or out of the present depot. These trains 
all stop in the City of Raleigh to change engines and service cars, but at a 
point where there are no facilities for handling baggage, mail or express. 
One of these through trains does handle a Raleigh-New York sleeper that 
is cut on and off at the Johnson Street yards and handled by switch 



Decisions and Adjustments op Complaints 53 

engine to and from the union depot. If adequate depot facilities were pro- 
vided on the main line of these roads so that these trains could serve Raleigh 
without unreasonable loss of time, it would be of great convenience to the 
traveling public and would furnish a valuable facility to the business interests 
of Raleigh in better mail service, in that they would furnish over-night 
mail service between Raleigh and New York. 

The present depot building occupies the entire width of land of the 
operating companies, and is constructed to the inner edge of the sidewalk 
on the front and side, with no provision for passenger vehicles except as 
they use the adjoining streets. There is no shed protection for passengers 
entering and leaving the depot, which should be provided either by a depot 
building located a sufficient distance from the street to permit ingress and 
egress of vehicles under shed protection, and without blocking the street, 
or by a sufficient width of building to provide for vehicular entrance. 

The toilet facilities in the present building are admittedly inadequate in 
size and equipment and require larger space and entirely new facilities. 

A restaurant, news stand and parcels checking compartment are all oper- 
ated in a room no larger than a medium-sized bedroom. 

The whole lay-out has served its time, is inadequate for present needs, 
and should be replaced by a modern structure planned to fit modern condi- 
tions and equipment for transportation now used by the carriers and also 
the modern means of transportation used by the public in going to and 
from the depot. 

It is clear that a passenger depot located at the site of the Boylan Ave- 
nue overhead bridge would be less expensive to operate, as it would be 
located on the main tracks of all three carriers, and would involve no switch- 
ing from main lines to reach it, as is now required by all three carriers. 
The loss of time of through travelers on account of present switch movement 
would be avoided, and to this extent such location would serve convenience 
of both carriers and traveling public. A depot constructed at this point 
would be of the overhead type, permitting by stairway separation of pas- 
sengers from the movement of mail, baggage and express. 

The present site is three blocks nearer the business district of the city. 
As between two sites, either of which may be found to be reasonably con- 
venient to the traveling public, the judgment of the carriers should be given 
great weight. They have the practical problem of operation and have ex- 
perience to guide them. It is their money that is to be spent and they are 
entitled to weigh the element of cost as well as the operating advantages 
and disadvantages. As between the present site and the suggested site at 
Boylan Avenue, no finding of preference will be made in this order if suf- 
ficient additional real estate is secured in connection with the present site 
to provide the necessary width for adequate facilities. There can be 
nothing added to the length of the present site, as it abuts on the street, 
and in our opinion additional land will be necessary if adequate facilities 
are to be provided there. 

There remains for consideration the question of jurisdiction, or more 
particularly the question if authority is vested in the North Carolina 
Corporation Commission, under the amended interstate commerce act, to 
make an order for the construction of a union passenger depot, under the 



54 N. C. Corporation Commission 

conditions involved in this case, that will be valid unless a supporting order 
or certificate of authority should be directed to the carriers by the Interstate 
Commerce Commission to make the contemplated expenditure. 

The only authoritative decision that throws light on this question is that 
of Railroad Commission of California v. Southern Pacific Co., et al, 264 
W. S. 331. In that case was involved authority of the Railroad Commission 
of California to require a group of carriers to make expenditure of twenty- 
eight million dollars covering construction of a union passenger depot and 
substantial additional main track mileage on overhead tracks through well- 
developed sections of Los Angeles to reach it. The opinion in that case, 
written by Chief Justice Taft, held that the extensive improvements con- 
templated in the order of the California Commission, and including ex- 
pensive additional main track mileage, would "require a certificate of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission as a condition precedent to the validity 
of any order by the State Commission," and also quoting that the proviso 
of Section 21 of the amended interstate commerce act "forbids the Com- 
mission to authorize or order the extention of its lines unless the Commission 
finds, as to such extension, that it is reasonably required in the interest of 
public convenience and necessity, or as to such extension * * * that the 
expense involved therein will not impair the ability of the carrier to per- 
form its duty to the public." 

The opinion of the court is clear and explicit upon the facts presented in 
that action. But the decision went further and undertook to suggest a di- 
viding line between the State and Federal authority, and says: (p. 345-6). 

It may well be that a mere relocation of a main track of an inter- 
state carrier which does not involve a real addition to, or abandonment 
of, main tracks and terminals, or a substantial change in destination, 
does not come within the paragraphs 18 to 21. One might, too, readily 
conceive of railroad crossings, or connections of interstate carriers in 
which the exercise by a state commission of the power to direct the 
construction of merely local union stations or terminals without exten- 
sions of main tracks and substantial capital outlay should be regarded 
as an ordinary exercise of the police power of the State for the public 
convenience and would not trench upon the power and supervision of 
the Interstate Commerce Commission in securing proper regulation of 
an interchange of interstate traffic or passengers. Only a lawful order 
of the Interstate Commerce Commission would raise a question of the 
power of a State commission in such cases, as the proviso of paragraph 
17, section 402, of the Transportation Act shows : 

'That nothing in this act shall impair or affect the right of a State, 
in the exercise of its police power, to require just and reasonable 
freight and passenger service for intrastate business, except insofar as 
such requirement is inconsistent with any lawful order of the Com- 
mission made under the provisions of this act.' 

The facts in this case seem to conform, in every particular, to the re- 
servation of authority as suggested by the Court. At either of the two loca- 
tions under consideration no extension of or addition to main line trackage 
of either carrier would be required. If any relocation of main line trackage 
at either site would be required, it would be purely incidental, and pre- 
sumably no relocation whatever could be required if the present site should 
be used. The amount of expenditure required, allocated between the three 
participating carriers, would be relatively nominal. The purpose served by 
such union passenger depot is largely local and intrastate in character. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 55 

At the present time there are twenty-three trains daily that come into the 
union station. The number is greater in the winter season. Of the twenty- 
three trains now using the station, twelve are trains having origin and 
destination between points in this State, and of course a part of the patron- 
age of the interstate trains is of intrastate characer. Under these condi- 
tions, and with the clear indication in the opinion of the highest court, we 
assume that it is not the purpose of the law to burden the docket of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission with proceedings of this character and 
involving a state of facts such as appear in this record. 

This interpretation is also consistent with the opinion of the North Caro- 
lina Supreme Court, in Corporation Commission v. R. R., 185 N. C, p. 435. 
in which it is held that an order of the Corporation Commission to provide 
adequate passenger depot facilities for the accommodation of passengers 
traveling between points in the State is a valid exercise of the police power 
and consistent with the terms of the amended interstate commerce act. 

Upon consideration of all the facts involved, it is found that the union 
passenger station now in use in the City of Raleigh is inadequate to serve 
the needs and convenience of the traveling public, and that the carriers 
should proceed without delay to provide suitable plans and to construct a 
modern union passenger station adequate in size, arrangement and equip- 
ment to meet the needs and convenience of the traveling public, either upon 
the site of the present depot, with such additional lands as may be necessary, 
or at the suggested site where the main tracks of these carriers converge 
at Boylan Avenue, and it is 

Ordered, That the Southern Railway Company, the Seaboard Air Line Rail 
way Company and the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company file with the 
Corporation Commission within ninety days from this date plans for a new 
and adequate union passenger station to be erected in the City of Raleigh 
upon either of the sites indicated in the findings herein made. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 31st day of August, 1927. Clerk. 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE CITY OF RALEIGH, ET AL. v. 
SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY, SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 
COMPANY AND NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Order Overruling Exceptions 

This matter again coming on to be heard upon the exceptions and new 
proposal of the respondents, following the request of the respondents herein 
that exceptions to the order of the Commission of August 31. 1927, which 
were filed in apt time, be not acted upon until they could file certain pro- 
posals ; and said respondents, pending the expiration of the time granted as 
a result of the request, having presented to the Commission plans and speci- 
fications for the repair and improvement of the present depot in the City of 
Raleigh ; and said plans and specifications and exceptions having been duly 
and thoroughly considered by the Commission in connection with its former 
order and the evidence introduced at the original hearing, the Commission 
is of the opinion, and so holds, that the plans and specifications for the repairs 
and improvement of the present depot facilities in the City of Raleigh are 
not adequate to meet the reasonable needs of the City of Raleigh for union 



56 N. C. Corporation Commission 

depot facilities and that the repairs and improvement, if made, will not meet 
the reasonable needs of the traveling public using and requiring accommo- 
dation in and through the union depot in the City of Raleigh. 

The proposed repairs and improvements, although requiring an estimated 
outlay of seventy -five thousand ($75,000) dollars on the part of the carriers, 
do not, in the view of the situation as taken by this Commission, furnish 
facilities which would be such improvement over the present facilities as 
required by the traveling public requiring union depot facilities in the City 
of Raleigh. This is due, in part, to the lack of additional land upon which 
to construct additional depot facilities at the present location of the union 
depot and in part to the fact that the proposed changes would not meet the 
requirements of passengers traveling into and out of Raleigh upon trains not 
now discharging passengers at the union station. The original record herein 
indicates the necessity for union depot facilities meeting the requirements of 
the entire traveling public through the Raleigh station and there are many 
other reasons which indicate to the Commission that the improvements pro- 
posed would not meet these requirements. If the carriers involved in this 
matter can make the extensions, improvements and repairs which they pro- 
pose, there can be no question as to their ability to make adequate provisions 
for taking care of the traveling public requiring union depot facilities in the 
City of Raleigh and it would be unwise, in the opinion of the Commission, to 
modify its original order so as to permit or encourage the providing of facili- 
ties not adequate to meet the needs of the public as shown to exist by the 
original record. 

Upon a full consideration of the proposed repairs and extensions and of 
the exceptions filed by the respondents herein, it is 

Ordered, That the exceptions filed by the respondent carriers in this pro- 
ceeding be, and they are hereby, overruled and that the order of the Com- 
mission of August 31, 1927, be, and it is hereby, amended by extending the 
time fixed therein for the filing of plans and specifications for a new and 
adequate union passenger station in Raleigh to ninety days from the date of 
this order. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 6th day of January, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6486. 

BEFORE THE NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION COMMISSION 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE CITY OF RALEIGH, ET AL., PETI- 
TIONERS, v. SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY, SEABOARD AIR LINE 
RAILWAY COMPANY, AND NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COM- 
PANY, RESPONDENTS. 

Order Overruling Motion 

This matter again coming on to be heard before the Corporation Commis- 
sion upon the 'motion of Southern Railway Company, Seaboard Air Line Rail- 
way Company and Norfolk Southern Railroad Company through their attor- 
neys, that all of the papers and evidence considered in this matter, together 
with the assignments of error filed by the appellants, be certified and trans- 
ferred to a Superior Court in term time other than the Superior Court of 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 57 

Wake County, and said motion having been heard and considered and the 
Commission being of the opinion that all papers and evidence considered by 
it in this case, together with the assignments of error filed by the appellants, 
should be certified to the Superior Court of Wake County, and that said 
motion should, therefore, be overruled. 

It is Now, Therefore, Ordered That said motion be and the same is hereby 
denied, and all papers and evidence considered by the Commission, together 
with the assignments of error filed by the appellants, are hereby ordered 
certified and transferred to the Superior Court of Wake County as provided 
by Statute for the certifying and transferring of such records of appeal. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 26th day of January, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6486. 

COMPLAINT OF ROGER MOORE'S SONS & COMPANY, v. ATLANTIC 
COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPANY, SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 
COMPANY, WILMINGTON, BRUNSWICK & SOUTHERN RAILROAD 
COMPANY. 

Order 

This complaint, dated September 30, 1927, alleges overcharge on seven cars 
of hollow building tile moving from Claybrick, N. C, to Bolivia, N. C, during 
the month of July, 1927. The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company con- 
tends the correct rate is fourteen cents per hundred pounds, while the Sea- 
board Air Line Railway Company contends the correct rate is eleven and one 
twenty-five thousandths cents per hundred pounds. The difference appears 
to be brought about by the fact the Seaboard Air Line recognizes application 
of Agent Jones' Combination Tariff, I. C. C. U. S. 1, in arriving at the rate ; 
while the Atlantic Coast Line does not use this basis. Under our Circular 
No. 276, the basis used by the Seaboard Air Line Railway is correct. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Wilmington, Brunswick & Southern Rail- 
Toad Company, Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and Seaboard Air Line 
Railway Company be, and they are hereby ordered and directed to pay Roger 
Moore's Sons & Company on or before April 15, 1928, the sum of one hundred 
sixty dollars and seventy-eight cents ($160.78), plus six per cent interest from 
September 30, 1927, this being the overcharge on seven cars of tile as follows : 

Car Number Overcharge 

SAL-27802 $ 18.40 

SAL-89390 .... 24.54 

SAL-80453 21.84 

SAL-81021 21.91 

SAL-20169 24.10 

SAL-80784 20.02 

SAL-89179 29.97 

Total $160.78 

Further Ordered, in settling this matter the Wilmington, Brunswick & 
Southern Rairoad Company, which line collected the revenue, pay this over- 



58 N. C. Corporation Commission 

charge and the other lines settle with that Company. Freight bills are being 
sent to the Wilmington, Brunswick & Southern Railroad Company with this 
order. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self. 

This 4th day of April, 1928. Clerk. 

APPLICATION OF ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPANY TO 
MAKE KERR, NORTH CAROLINA, A PREPAY STATION. 

Order 

This application is dated January 19, 1928, and upon receipt of same the 
Commission directed that notice of the application be posted at the station 
for public information. As a result of this notice the Commission received a 
number of letters, also a petition from citizens of the Kerr section protesting 
against closing the agency at Kerr. 

Hearing was held at Raleigh, N. C, April 3, 1928. The evidence shown by 
audited figures gave the average revenue per month at this station for the 
months of July. August, September, October, November and December, 1927, 
was $541.70 which was 21 per cent less than the average monthly revenue 
for the same months of the previous year. The expenses of the station are 
something above $100 monthly. It was admitted that 90 per cent of the 
business done at this station originates or terminates in the Harrell's Store 
section, which point is by dirt road about seven miles from Kerr and nine 
miles from Ivanhoe, the latter point being a regular agency station with tele- 
graph office. There is no telegraph office at Kerr. 

Objection to the closing of the agency could be sustained only upon a 
showing of great inconvenience to the shipping public measured by the expense 
to the railroad of keeping the agency open. The reduction in carrier's revenue 
at this station appears to result from the use by shippers of trucks in haul- 
ing goods to and from Harrell's Store section, which is located on Highway 
No. 60, and which goods were formerly handled at Kerr station. 

There was no evidence tending to indicate that business at Kerr might 
improve. 

It appears there is a fairly good dirt road from Ivanhoe to Harrell's Store, 
the distance being about two miles greater than from Kerr. It is not pro- 
posed to abandon the station at Kerr, but only that the same be made a non- 
agency station. 

In view of the circumstances, the Commission is of the opinion, and so 
finds, that on account of the declining revenue at Kerr when considered in 
connection with station expenses and the proximity of Ivanhoe, a regular 
agency and telegraph office, it will not be unreasonable to allow the carriers 
to close the Kerr agency. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the application of the Atlantic Coast Line 
Railroad Company to close the agency at Kerr be, and the same is hereby 
granted. 

By direction of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 7th day of May, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6678. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 59 

EQUITABLE FREIGHT ADJUSTMENT BUREAU. WILMINGTON. N. C. 
v. COMMON CARRIERS OF NORTH CAROLINA. WHOSE RATES ARE 
GOVERNED BY THE NORTH CAROLINA EXCEPTION SHEET. 

CLASSIFICATION OF AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

Order 

This complaint is in the form of claims, filed by the Equitable Freight 
Adjustment Bureau, Wilmington. N. C. for overcharges by the carriers on 
certain shipments of agricultural implements, in less carload lots, classified 
in the North Carolina Exception Sheet, and rated at 4th class. These imple- 
ments are described in the Exception Sheet at "knocked down, packed", 
whereas the Southern Classification gives a more detailed description, stating 
they must be boxed, or crated, or in some instances in bundles. All the 
Southern Classification ratings on these agricultural implements are higher 
under the Exception Sheet. 

The complaint was heard by the Commission. December 8. 1927. The 
carriers contend that the word "packed"' means the implements should be 
boxed, or crated, and that the 4th class rating would not apply on implements 
when packed in bundles. By reference to Pages 51-54, inclusive. Volume 6. 
of Judicial and Statutory Definitions of Words and Phrases", collected, edited 
and compiled by members of the editorial staff of the National Reporter 
System, we find the following: 

"PACK. The term 'to pack', in its ordinary signification especially 
when used in reference to carriage, means to place together and prepare 
for transportation, as to make up a bundle or bale." 

The Commission is of the opinion, and so finds, that the items in the North 
Carolina Exception Sheet followed by the word "Packed", should be con- 
strued to mean "to place together and prepare for transportation as to make 
up a bundle or bale." 

Therefore Ordered, That the Common Carriers of the State whose rates 
are governed by the North Carolina Exception Sheet be. and they are hereby 
ordered and directed to observe the above opinion and finding when applying 
the Exception Sheet within the State. 

Further Ordered, That this opinion and finding be observed in settlement 
of any overcharge claims presented to the said Common carriers based thereon. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self. 

This 21st day of June. 1928. Clerk, 

COMPLAINT OF CAROLINA COAL COMPANY v. ABERDEEN & ROCK- 
FISH RAILROAD COMPANY. ATLANTIC & YADKIN RAILWAY. (A. E. 
Smith and J. W. Fry, Receivers). ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD 
COMPANY, DURHAM & SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY. NORFOLK 
SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY. SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 
COMPANY, SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY. 

Order 

Hearing in the above complaint was held at Raleigh. June 15. 1928 ; com- 
plaint states that coal production has been greatly increased at Cumnock 
Mines and it is expected to further increase the output; that some of the 



60 N. C. Corporation Commission 

present coal rates are too high to permit of free marketing ; also when com- 
pared with rates on coal in other sections, and complainants point to mileage 
rates of the Norfolk & Western Railway in their tariff, I. C. C. 3'083-B as 
justifying their position. Group rates are asked for from Cumnock along the 
lines of destination groupings in rates from coal producing points outside the 
State. 

At the hearing complainants pointed out that their Company recently had 
further surveys made and that coal supply underground in the Cumnock Dis- 
trict is enormous ; that while they have already made heavy expenditures it 
would be necessary that they continue to spend great sums in the development. 
State convicts have recently been employed as miners, thereby greatly increas- 
ing the output which must of necessity find a market in the State at reason- 
able rates in competition with group rates from interstate points. 

Carriers' contention in the matter was to the effect that rates named in 
the Corporation Commission's order, dated October 5, 1925, were lower than 
it is thought they should be and evidence was introduced showing compari- 
sons of rates in Alabama and other coal producing States for like distances; 
also comparisons of earnings of North Carolina carriers on coal coming from 
points outside of the State. 

In its order of October 5, 1925, the Commission pointed out to some extent 
mining conditions in the Cumnock District, and also that there was prospects 
of steadily increasing the output of coal and gradual development of impor- 
tant and profitable coal mining industry for supplying the territory in which 
its location gives it proper advantage in freight rates. 

The Carolina Coal Company's mine is located about four miles distant from 
the main line of the Norfolk Southern and Atlantic & Yadkin, and is served 
only by spur track of the Coal Company, which is operated by the owners 
with their own locomotives and empty cars are hauled in and loads out by 
the miner owners' own power. It will, therefore, be apparent that terminal 
cost is largely borne by the Carolina Coal Company. Direct physical con- 
nection is had only between the coal company's spur and the line of the Nor- 
folk Southern, but there is also physical connection between the Norfolk 
Southern and the Atlantic. & Yadkin at the junction with the coal company's 
spur, and provision will be made for reasonable charges as -between the two 
carriers on shipments moving initially by the Atlantic & Yadkin line. The 
Atlantic & Yadkin Railroad, whose stock and bonds are owned, outright, or 
guaranteed by the Southern Railway, was formerly a part of that system, 
and is a part of the Cape Fear & Yadkin Valley Railroad which was pur- 
chased at the receivership sale by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad in 1897 for 
the joint account of its own company and that of the Southern Railway. The 
original line reached from Wilmington to Mt. Airy, N. C, with branches, 
Fayettsville, N. C, to Bennettsville, S. C, Climax to Ramseur, N. C, and 
Summerfield to Madison, N. C. Subsequent to receivership sale that part of 
the line north of Sanford was operated as part of the Southern Railway Sys- 
tem, and that part south of Sanford as part of the Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road system. Still later on the Southern Railway dismembered that part it 
operated in its system, and put it back as an independent line and the same 
is now in receivership. 

During the years in which the Southern and Atlantic Coast Line have 
owned, or controlled the line, rates have been made on continuous single line 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 



61 



mileage as between the two companies, and likewise on the same basis as 
between stations on the Atlantic & Yadkin, and Southern Railway System in 
North Carolina, and this basis has been kept in mind in making coal rates 
prescribed herein. The rates prescribed herein are made with view to aiding 
in the development of the coal industry as against interstate origin points and 
represent our best judgment, having in mind reasonable revenue on the traffic 
for the carriers. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Aberdeen & Rockflsh Railroad Co., 
Atlantic & Yadkin Railway Co., (A. E. Smith and J. W. Fry, Receivers), 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co., Durham & Southern Railroad Co., Norfolk 
Southern Railroad Co., Seaboard Air Line Railway Co., and Southern Railway 
Company be, and they are hereby ordered and directed to put in force from 
and after July 10, 1928, rates on coal, carload 80.000 lbs. minimum, per ton 
of 2,000 lbs., from Cumnock, N. C, to destinations shown below: (See Note). 



In Cents Per Ton, 2,000 Pounds. 



Destination Rate 

Aberdeen 116 

Apex 101 

Cameron 91 

Carpenter 141 

Chapel Hill 141 

Charlotte 139 

Clayton 128 

Colon 76 

Concord 151 

Farmville 139 

Fayetteville 101 

Fort Bragg 101 

Gastonia 166 

Gulf 76 

Goldsboro 154 

Greensboro 113 

Greenville 151 



Destination Rate 

Henderson 141 

High Point 113 

Hope Mills 101 

Hoffman 116 

Kinston 154 

Lexington 126 

Lumberton 141 

Maxton 126 

Moncure 91 

Monroe 154 

Morganton 176 

Mount Holly 166 

New Bern 176 

Pinehurst 113 

Pembroke 141 

Raeford 153 

Rockingham 128 



Destination Rate 

Rocky Mount 154 

Raleigh 101 

Salisbury 139 

Samarcand 101 

Sanatorium 141 

Sanford 76 

Siler City 76 

Southern Pines 116 

Spencer 139 

Smithfield 141 

Tarboro 166 

Wadesboro 141 

Washington 164 

Wilmington 151 

Wilson 139 

Winston-Salem 126 



NOTE : A switching charge of $2.25 per car may be added to the above 
rates in cases where it is necessary that the Norfolk Southern Railroad 
switch cars to the Atlantic & Yadkin Railway for initial movement from the 
Carolina Coal Mine via that line. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 3rd day of July, 1928. Clerk. 

IN THE MATTER OF APPLICATION OF THE SEABOARD AIR LINE 
RAILWAY COMPANY TO DISCONTINUE AGENCY AT ADDOR, NORTH 
CAROLINA. 



Order 

Hearing in the above application was held at Raleigh, N. C, at 11 :00 A. M., 
October 18, 1928, the Seaboard Air Line Railway was represented by Vice- 
President W. L. Stanley, and the citizens of Addor and community by Mr. 
Murdock M. Johnson, Attorney at Law, Aberdeen, N. C. 

Before entering into the taking of testimony the Commission was requested 
to give representatives of both sides an opportunity to hold a conference and 
this was done, after which Vice-President Stanley made a statement to the 



62 N. C. Corporation Commission 

effect that the parties interested in this proceeding had reached an agree- 
ment to the effect that Addor, North Carolina, should hecome a prepay sta- 
tion, except that from July 1st, to January 1st, inclusive, of each year the 
Seaboard Air Line Railway would place an agent at this point for the pur- 
pose of handling all traffic in the regular way, as it was recognized this was 
the principal season for the movement of peaches and cotton. 

Mr. Murdock M. Johnson, Attorney for the citizens of Addor and community, 
stated this was in accordance with the agreement with the Seaboard Air Line 
Railway, and was entirely agreeable to the parties represented by him. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Seaboard Air Line be, and it is hereby 
ordered and directed to discontinue the agency at Addor. North Carolina, 
except during the months from July 1st to January 1st, inclusive, of each 
year a regular agency is to be operated as heretofore. 

By direction of the Commission : R. O. Self. 

1 This 18th day of October, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6721. 

IN THE MATTER OF APPLICATION OF THE ATLANTIC COAST LINE 
RAILROAD COMPANY TO DISCONTINUE THE AGENCY AT PARK- 
ERSBURG, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

Hearing on the above application was held at Raleigh, October 19, the 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad being represented by Mr. Murray Allen, At- 
torney ; Mr. C. G. Sibley, General Superintendent ; Mr. L. Croker, Super- 
intendent, and H. J. Jones, Agency Supervisor. 

Protest was made by Messrs. I. Y. Benton, 3c se E. Barnes, C. W. Howard 
and J. F. Simmons. Statement of revenue and earnings of this agency as 
presented by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company shows net revenue 
accruing to the Atlantic Coast Line at this station was for the twelve 
months ending June 30, 1927, $18,108.61, and for the year ending June 30. 
1928, $12,628.27. While the net decrease for 1928 from that of 1927 is 
given as 50.2 per cent, the Commission is of the opinion and so finds that 
the revenue and earnings accredited to Parkersburg are of such volume 
as to make it unreasonable that this agency be closed. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the application of the Atlantic Coast Line 
Railroad Company to close the agency at Parkersburg, North Carolina, be 
and the same is hereby denied and the proceedings dismissed. 

By direction of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 24th day of October, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6722. 

IN THE MATTER OF APPLICATION OF ATLANTIC COAST LINE 
RAILROAD COMPANY TO DISCONTINUE AGENCY AT SHANNON, 
NORTH CAROLINA, AND MAKE SAME A PREPAY STATION. 

Order 
Hearing in the above application was held at Raleigh, on October 19, 
1928, the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company being represented by Mr. 
Murray Allen, Attorney: Mr. C. G. Sibley, General Superintendent; Mr. H. 
J. Jones, Agency Supervisor: and Mr. R. B. Hare, Superintendent. 



Decisions and Adjustments op Complaints 63 

The Commission received protest by letters from Hoke Lumber Company 
and J. L. MacLaren and other merchants, the protest of the Hoke Lumber 
Company being subsequently withdrawn. 

Statements showing revenue earnings of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad 
Company at this station were presented by the Atlantic Coast Line people, 
and the same show that for sixteen months beginning May, 1927, and ending 
August, 1928, the total cash remitted by the agent was $1,396.91, the 
monthly average being $87.31 ; while the monthly wage paid the agent was 
$100.43. 

In view of the earnings at this station the Commission is of the opinion, 
and so finds, it would be unreasonable to require the further maintenance 
of a regular agency at Shannon. North Carolina, and 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Com- 
pany be, and it is hereby authorized to discontinue the regular agency 
at Shannon and make same a regular prepay station. 

By direction of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 24th day of October, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 0722. 
IN THE MATTER OF APPLICATION OF ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAIL- 
ROAD COMPANY TO DISCONTINUE THE AGENCY AT HASTY, 
NORTH CAROLINA, AND MAKE SAME A PREPAY STATION. 

Order 
Hearing in the above application was held at Raleigh, October 19, 1928 r 
the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company being represented by Attorney 
Murray Allen, of Raleigh : General Superintendent C. G. Sibley, of Rocky 
Mount ; Superintendent R. B. Hare, and Agency Supervisor H. J. Jones. 

The Commission received a petition by C. L. Jones and others, of Hasty, 
protesting against the closing of this agency, and also letter from Messrs. 
Gibson & Gill, Attorneys of Laurinburg, as representing petitioners, how- 
ever, no parties appeared in protest at the hearing. 

The statements showing actual cash receipts at Hasty, North Carolina, 
for 16 months beginning May, 1927, and ending August, 1928, was $1,651.66, 
or an average monthly cash receipt of $103.24; while the average monthly 
wages paid agent is $100.29 during this period. 

In view of the showing of the earnings and expenses at this station the 
Commission is of the opinion, and so finds, that it would be unreasonable to 
require the further maintenance of this agency. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company 
be, and they are hereby authorized, to close the agency at Hasty, North 
Carolina, and make same a regular prepay station; 

By direction of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 24th day of October, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6722. 

IN THE MATTER OF APPLICATION OF ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAIL- 
ROAD COMPANY TO DISCONTINUE AGENCY AT MANCHESTER, 
NORTH CAROLINA AND MAKE THE SAME A PREPAY STATION. 

Order 
A hearing on this application was held at Raleigh, N. C, October 19, 1928, 
the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company being represented by Mr. Murray 



64 Ni C. Corporation Commission 

Allen, Attorney; Mr. C. G. Sibley, General Superintendent; L. Croker, 
Superintendent; H. J. Jones, Agency Supervisor. The application was 
opposed at the hearing by Mr. I. A. Hurchison and Mr. G. A. Harps. 

Revenue statements of earnings, both actual and allocated, at this station 
were presented by the applicant, the actual cash receipts for the entire 
year of 1927 was $2,232.12, and for nine months from January 1 to Sep- 
tember 30, 1928, inclusive, was $1,024.79. The cost of operating the station 
for the twelve months ending May 31, 1928, was shown as $1,491.98, this 
being only the actual wages paid the agent. 

In view of the revenue earnings of this station, the Commission is of the 
opinion, and so finds, that it would be unreasonable to require the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad Company to maintain the same as a regular agency 
point, however, the Commission also finds it would be unreasonable not to 
require that the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company retain at this 
point what is known in their operations as a caretaker. 

It is Therefore Ordered, That the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Com- 
pany be, and the same is hereby authorized to discontinue the regular 
agency at Manchester, North Carolina, making the same a regular prepay 
station. 

It is Hereby Further Ordered, To inaugurate simultaneously with the 
discontinuance of the regular agency the service of a caretaker with regular 
duties of such in line with that performed at other stations of like kind 
and class. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 24th day of October, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 2762. 



Norfolk and Western Railway Company v. West Jefferson and Tucker- 
dale Telephone Company. Complaint of telephone wire crossings. The mat- 
ter is served on defendant for adjustment and after much correspondence 
complainant is advised to bring suit against defendant for failure to comply 
herewith and have them pay the penalties prescribed by law. Dismissed. 

O. G. Edwards v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint of 
sanitary conditions on train. Adjusted. 

Durham Chamber of Commerce v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Company 
and Southern Railway Company. Train connections at Raleigh between 
Seaboard Air Line train No. 303, southbound, and Southern train No. 16. 
Adjusted. 

Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Com- 
pany. Complaint of failure of defendant company to have main line switch 
lights. Dismissed. 

N. B. McDeavitt v. Southern Railway Company. Petition to have trains 
Nos. 11 and 12 stop at Stackhouse. Dismissed. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application to make Sky- 
land a non-agency station. Application withdrawn. 

Tallullah Falls Railway Company v. Western Carolina Telephone Company. 
Complaint of telephone line crossing main line tracks at Prentiss. Adjusted. 

Edwin A. Holt v. Southern Railway. Petition for change in schedule of 
train No. 16, having it leave Greensboro thirty minutes earlier. Petition 
granted by defendant. 



Decisions and Adjustments op Complaints 65 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application 
for change in schedule of Wilmington-Rutherford trains. Granted. 

Black Mountain Railway Company to the Commission. Application to 
discontinue handling passengers, baggage, mail and express on its line of 
road in Yancey County. Protest is filed by the Yancey County Merchants 
Association at Burnsville, and, after hearing the matter, the plaintiff with- 
draws the request for discontinuance of express service with the under- 
standing that those protesting would make no objections to discontinuance 
of passenger and baggage service. Petition granted as to discontinuance 
of handling baggage and passengers. 

Buchan Farming Company v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Company. Fa- 
cilities at Addor. The station at Addor having been burned and a car 
used as a station with no place for delivery or receiving of freight, re- 
quest is made for a new station building. Defendant company advises that 
station building has been completed and case is closed. 

J. E. Rogers v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint against the dis- 
continuance of Thomasville siding. Adjusted. 

Clinchfield Railroad Company to the Commission. Application to close 
agency at Boonford and make same a non-agency station. Application with- 
drawn. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application for author- 
ity to make Horseshoe a non-agency station. Application withdrawn. 

J. H. N. Brendle v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of cattle 
guards at railway crossings. Adjusted. 

City of Asheville v. Southern Railway Company. Petition for hearing 
as to payment of costs of construction of temporary trestles necessary to 
construct a viaduct over the yards and tracks of the Southern Railway 
Company at Biltmore. Petition withdrawn. 

Kinston Carolina Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
reduction of train service between Kinston and Beulaville. Granted. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for changes 
in passenger trains. Schedules approved. 

Dover and Southbound Railway Company to the Commission. Authority 
to discontinue handling of passengers between Dover and Richlands. Granted. 

J. B. Hoyle v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of station facilities 
at Hazelwood. Adjusted. 

Carolina and Northeastern Railroad Company v. Barkley-Keever Com- 
pany. Complaint of wire crossings near mile post No. 65. Adjusted. 

Tallullah Falls Railroad Company to the Commission. Application to 
discontinue agency at Prentiss. Granted. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application to 
close Lakeview as agency station. Granted. 

J. T. Cunningham v. Southern Railway Company. Petition asking that 
trains Nos. 17 and 20 stop at Noland on flag. Granted. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Petition to 
discontinue trains Nos. 19 and 20 between Hamlet and Wilmington. Granted. 

Mrs. E. L. Woodward v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Company. Appli- 
cation for train No. 20 to stop at Epps Springs on flag. Granted. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Petition to make Hills- 
boro and Graham conditional stops for No. 111. Granted. 



66 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Citizens of West Asheville v. Southern Railway Company. Application 
to the Commission for freight and passenger depot in lieu of present prepay 
station at Boswell, to be known as West Asheville. The commission is ad- 
vised by the defendant company that the business to be served by such 
agency was insufficient to justify the expenditure sufficient to take care of 
the establishment of the freight station and that the business of that sec- 
tion could be adequately accommodated through the Asheville station and 
the prepay station at Boswell. Dismissed. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for discon- 
tinuance of train from Charlotte to Taylorsville. Plaintiff is advised that 
the petition will be allowed when proper provision has been made for 
handling mail. 

P. C. Henson and Company v. Blackwood Lumber Company. Complaint 
of condition of sidetrack at Cullowhee on the Tuckaseegee Southeastern 
Railroad Company. It appearing that delay in taking care of siding was 
due to rebuilding bridges, fills, etc., caused by flood, and that the matter 
will have attention as promptly as possible, case is dismissed. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
mixed train between Lewiston and Boykins. Granted. 



ELECTRIC LIGHT AND POWER COMPANIES 

CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY. TO THE COMMISSION. 
STREET CAR RATES FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN. 

Order 

Whereas, Under its franchise in the City of Raleigh, and pursuant to an 
order of this Commission under date of November 25, 1921, Carolina Power 
& Light Company is now providing a return trip street railway ticket which 
is sold to teachers and pupils attending certain schools in the City of Raleigh 
for the sum of eight cents (8c) which entitles each teacher or pupil to one 
round trip on each school day, and 

Whereas, The Parent-Teacher Association of the City of Raleigh has re- 
quested Carolina Power & Light Company to substitute in lieu of said round 
trip ticket, one way tickets to be sold at four cents (4c) each, the use 
of said tickets to be subject to regulations as hereinafter set forth, and 

Whereas, It is believed that such change would be to the benefit of both 
pupils and teachers and would stimulate the use of street cars by said pupils 
and teachers, and 

Whereas, Carolina Power & Light Company is willing to give the proposed 
plan a trial for a period of sixty days and thereafter to continue the same 
provided in its opinion the increased patronage of the street railway justi- 
fies same. 

Now, Therefore, be it ordered : 

First: That Carolina Power & Light Company be directed to sell to bona 
fide pupils and teachers of schools in the city of Raleigh as hereinafter 
defined, books of one-way school tickets at the rate of four eents <4c) per 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 07 

ticket, said books to contain not more than fifty (50) tickets to be sold at 
the office of the company and said tickets to be issued to pupils and teachers 
upon presentation of certificate from the principal of the school attended, 
that the applicant is a bona fide pupil or teacher of said school. And said 
tickets shall be good when presented between the hours of 7 :30 a. m. and 
6:00 p. m. on regular school days and shall only be used for the purpose of 
going to and from school. 

Second : Only bona fide pupils and teachers of public, grammar, academic, 
or business schools situated in the City of Raleigh shall be entitled to the 
use of said school tickets provided, however, that pupils residing in or at 
any boarding school shall not be entitled to the use of said tickets. 

Third : That Carolina Power & Light Company shall not be required to 
sell to any pupil or teacher within any period a greater number of tickets 
than would be required to entitle such teacher or student to one trip to and 
one trip from school on each day such pupil or teacher is required to attend 
school for instruction or teaching. 

Fourth : This is a temporary order made at the request of the Parent- 
Teacher Association of the City of Raleigh by and with the consent of 
Carolina Power & Light Company and is issued subject to approval of City 
Commissioners of the City of Raleigh by proper resolution or ordinance. 
This order shall remain in force only for a period of sixty (60) days from 
February 1. 1927, unless thereafter made permanent at the request of 
Carolina Power & Light Company. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 29th day of January, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6511. 

IN RE PETITION OF GASTONIA AND SUBURBAN GAS COMPANY 
FOR PERMISSION TO REVISE ITS GAS RATES IN GASTONIA, 
NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

Upon application of the Gastonia and Suburban Gas Company for per- 
mission to revise its gas rates in Gastonia, North Carolina, it is found that 
the revision has the approval of the City Council of Gastonia, as evidenced 
by a letter on file with the Commission from the City Manager, therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petitioner be. and is hereby, authorized, effective De- 
cember 1, 1927, to charge the following rates, to-wit : 

Gross Net 

First 700 cu. ft. or less $1.60 $1.50 

Next 2,300 cu. ft. or less 2.10 2.00 per M. 

Next 7,000 cu. ft. or less 1.95 1.85 per M. 

Next 10,000 cu. ft. or less 1.80 1.70 per M. 

Next 30,000 cu. ft. or less 1.60 1.50 per M. 

All over 50,000 cu. ft. or less 1.40 1.30 per M. 

Prepay Meters, 2.20 per M. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 10th day of November, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6610. 



68 N. C. Corporation Commission 

IN RE PETITION OF CONCORD AND KANNAPOLIS GAS COMPANY 
FOR PERMISSION TO REVISE ITS RATES FOR CONCORD AND 
KANNAPOLIS. 

Order 

Upon application of the Concord and Kannapolis Gas Company for per- 
mission to revise its gas rates for Concord and Kannapolis, it is found that 
the revision has the approval of the officials of the City of Concord. Kanna- 
polis is not incorporated and since the rate asked for is, in a measure, a 
reduction, the petition is granted ; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petitioner be, and is hereby, authorized, effective De- 
cember 1, 1927, to charge the following rates, to-wit : 

Gross Net 

First 700 cu. ft. or less $1.60 $1.50 

Next 2,300 cut. ft. or less 2.10 2.00 per M. 

Next 7,000 cu. ft. or less 1.95 1.85 per M. 

Next 10,000 cu. ft. or less 1.80 1.70 per M. 

Next 30,000 cu. ft or less 1.60 1.50 per M. 

All over 50,000 cu. ft 1.40 1.30 per M. 

Prepay Meters 2.20 per M. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 10th day of November, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6616. 

IN RE COMMISSION'S ORDER OF NOVEMBER 1, 1927, PROMULGATING 
GAS RATES FOR THE TOWNS OF HENDERSON, OXFORD AND 
ELIZABETH CITY. 

Order 

Upon application of the Henderson and Oxford Gas Company of Hen- 
derson, North Carolina, and the Elizabeth and Suburban Gas Company of 
Elizabeth City, North Carolina, the Commission made an order promulgating 
certain gas rates in the towns of Henderson, Oxford and Elizabeth City. 
Now upon petition of the same companies,. Item 2 of said order, which be- 
gins : "Domestic consumers now using ranges or hot water heaters," is 
hereby amended to read : "Domestic consumers now using ranges or hot 
water heaters, or both, will have their consumption averaged for one year 
prior to November, 1927. All consumption above this point during the 
season beginning November to May, 31, will be billed at $1.55 per thou- 
sand cubic feet." 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 9th day of January, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6611. 

IN RE BUREAU OF LIGHTHOUSES, UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT 
OF COMMERCE V. SOUTHERN PUBLIC UTILITIES COMPANY, 
CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

This is the petition of the Bureau of Lighthouses. United States De- 
partment of Commerce, having in charge the construction, supervision, and 



Decisions and Adjustments op Complaints 69 

management of airway beacons, towers, and landing fields for commercial 
aviation under the Air Commerce Act for encouraging and fostering com- 
mercial aviation. 

The petitioner contends in order that the fullest advantages may be 
obtained from air commerce, it is necessary that airways be operated by 
night as well as by day ; and, to the end that night flying may be accom- 
plished with the maximum safety to pilots and passengers, the Department is 
marking the routes by electrically lighted intermediate landing fields at 
30-mile intervals with beacon lights at 10-mile intervals between these 
fields ; that the connected load at each intermediate landing field is approxi- 
mately 2.3 k. w. and the energy consumption about 800 k. w. h. per month, 
while each beacon between the fields has a load of approximately 1.6 k. 
w. and an energy consumption of about 600 k. w. h. per month, all lights 
at both types of beacon being lighted from sunset to sunrise each night 
in the year, the loads being fractional horsepower motors as well as lighting 
at each site. The petitioner prefers to obtain commercial power at each 
site rather than to use engine-generator sets, because through the use of 
control devices such installations are semi-automatic. Petitioner contends 
that in states where this new use of electricity has not already been con- 
sidered, there is no rate that adequately covers this service ; that airways 
are laid out, as nearly as practicable, in a straight line, necessitating the 
location of lights, or fields, at isolated places some distance from the trans- 
mission trunk lines from which power is available ; that the Government 
is prepared to pay its proper share of the cost of power to these sites and 
is willing to purchase outright pole line extensions and to maintain them. 
From its previous experience, it is found that power companies, in general 
are willing to expend a sum equal to from two and one-half to three times 
the estimated revenue from a beacon to be served in constructing the pole 
line extension to such beacon ; that this sum may be increased in the same 
proportion by revenues obtained from additional customers using power from 
these extensions, the excess, if any, in construction cost is then charged 
to the Department of Commerce and paid by monthly service charge until 
amortized, with provision in the contract that protects the power company 
in the event of unforeseen necessity of discontinuance of airways service 
before the monthly service charges shall have amortized the Government's 
share of construction cost. 

The respondent, the Southern Public Utilities Company, states that it 
does not serve communities affected in this State south of Salisbury be- 
cause the route is laid via Mooresville and Gastonia ; that the Salisbury site' 
is 1,500 feet from its transmission trunk, that at Thomasville, 17.424 feet; 
High Point, 8,448 feet; Greensboro, 6,336 feet; Reidsville, 26,400 feet; that 
to serve such points even at regular lighting rate which it has in force for 
all lighting customers would be unremunerative ; that if it were to under- 
take to serve this airway route at anything less than its regular lighting 
rate, the loss in such service would be prohibitive. The respondent further 
states that it does not give special power rates until a demand of two horse- 
power or over is made and the single phase current up to two horsepower 
is and has been the custom of the company and three phase over that; that 
it cannot change its policy in this case without discriminating against other 
customers and that it would be giving a rate which, to that special service, 



70 N. C. Corporation Commission 

would show a loss and would have to be made up by other classes of service 
on its regular lighting rate if the company received any remuneration from 
any source therefor; that in order not to delay construction or installation 
of the fields and beacons, that they have gone ahead and built the con- 
nections in cooperation with the Department of Commerce; that the total 
cost of such installations, except that at Greensboro which was estimated, 
is approximately $15,000, a large part of which would be repaid by the 
Government during the process of the amortization; that the company will 
maintain the lines and keep them in order so as to deliver the power under 
its contract at all times. Respondent further claims that in any event 
each site must be served by a separate transformer and the loss of energy 
will about equal the consumption. The petitioner also contends that con- 
sideration should be given to the uniform load from sunset to sunrise each 
night throughout the year. The respondent says if this were not true, it 
would be impossible to render the service the distance from its transmission 
trunks at the rate which it has offered because of the small load demand. 

The Commission has made a lighting rate which is uniform for the cus- 
tomers of the Southern Public Utilities Company and the reasons advanced 
for a less rate for the airways service are prompted by the desire of the 
Department of Commerce for airways development. The consumption at such 
stations is so low that it does not justify the making of a special rate for 
this service and especially not without creating a loss to the company for that 
particular service because of the reasons advanced above. In this case, the 
respondent has filed with the Commission its lighting rate, making it ap- 
plicable to the airways service. This is an untried field for local utilities 
and it may be that the future will develop just what is a reasonable rate 
and special attention will be given in the future to the result of the rates 
in connection with this service in order that the Commission may ascertain 
what is reasonable and just. The respondent has made considerable con- 
cession in the installation of a service that it considers will be unremunera- 
tive and the Commission does not feel that concession should now be made 
in the matter of rates until the service has been tried and its result dem- 
onstrated ; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the case be dismissed and that the rate previously filed by 
the Southern Public Utilities Company with the Commission applicable to 
other lighting service is hereby approved for application to this service 
from and after its installation. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

" This 14th day of May, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6640. 

IN RE ELECTRIC LIGHT RATES TO BE CHARGED BY THE BREVARD 
LIGHT AND POWER COMPANY TO SUMMER CAMPS AND OTHER 
SEASONAL CUSTOMERS AT BREVARD, IN TRANSYLVANIA COUNTY, 
NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 
This petition came before the Commission by way of complaint on the 
part of the Brevard Light & Power Company to a rate which had been 
previously installed for seasonal lighting for summer camps which operate 



Decisions and Adjustments op Complaints 71 

about two months in the year near Brevard, North Carolina. There had 
been considerable correspondence between the operators of the camps and 
the light company with reference to just what the rate should be. The Com- 
pany has been considerable embarrassed in serving its patrons because of 
a lack of sufficient power ; and, for that reason, it was not anxious to take 
on this class of service to the exclusion of its regular annual customers. 

The case was heard at Waynesville by Chairman Lee on June 21st, and 
after due consideration by him and presentation of the facts to the full 
membership of the Commission, it is 

Ordered, That, effective July 1, 1928, the Brevard Light & Power Company 
is authorized to charge the following rates to summer camps using elec- 
tricity for a period of three months or less of each year : 

First 25 k. w. h. @ 20c per k. w. h. 

Next 25 k. w. h. @ 18c per k. w. h. 

Next 25 k. w. h. @ 16c per k. w. h. 

Next 50 k. w. h. @ : ...14c per k. w. h. 

All over 125 k. w. h. @ 12c per k. w. h. 

Customers using this rate will be subject to pay a minimum of $1.50 per 
month for a period of twelve months in each year in which service is fur- 
nished for a period of three months, or less, but such monthly minimum 
charge shall not be made against any customer for any month in which the 
total bill at the above rate shall exceed the amount of the monthly minimum. 
It is 

Further Ordered, That the Brevard Light & Power Company shall con- 
tinue to serve residential seasonal lighting customers, who take the service 
for a period of four months, or less, under the following rates fixed by the 
Commission under date of August 13, 1925, which shall apply to all domestic 
residential use : 

First 10 k. w. h. @ 20c per k. w. h. 

Next 25 k. w. h. @ 18c per k. w. h. 

Next 25 k. w. h. @ 16c per k. w. h. 

Next 50 k. w. h. @ 14c per k. w. h. 

All over 110 k. w. h. @ 12c per k. w. h. 

Customers using this class of service under this rate shall be subject 
to a minimum charge of $1.50 per month for each calendar month, or fraction 
thereof, that service is connected. 

Tent shows and carnivals showing in one location for a period of one 
week, or less, shall be subject to a rate of twenty (20c) cents per kilowatt 
hour for energy consumed and. in addition, shall pay a connection charge 
of $3.00 for each meter installed. 

By order of the Commission : R. o. Self, 

This 6th day of July, 1928. Clerk. 



Cullowhee State Normal School to the Commission. Schedule of electric 
lighting rates for community filed and approved. 

North Carolina Public Service Company to the Commission. Rate of $3.00 
for current consumed by motor on sanding machine to surface floors of 
buildings of six rooms, or less, with charge of $2.00 for rendering service 
wires to incomplete buildings. Approved. 

Southern Power Company to the Commission. Amendment to power 
contract. Approved. 



72 N. C. Corporation Commission 

W. B. White v. Carolina Power and Light Company. Complaint as to 
meter service. Adjusted. 

C. J. Markham v. Carolina Power and Light Company. Complaint as to 
meter service. Adjusted. 

Hayesville Electric Company to the Commission. Rate schedules for 
Hayesville. Approved. 

Tidewater Power Company to the Commission. Optional residential com- 
bination electric lighting rate filed and approved by the Commission sub- 
ject to hearing upon complaint. 

Town of Franklin to the Commission. Rate for refrigeration motor and 
sign lighting filed with approval of the Commission, subject to hearing 
upon complaint. 

Carolina Power and Light Company to the Commission. Combination 
charge lighting power service rates filed and approved, subject to hearing 
upon complaint, effective April 1, 1927. 

J. P. Campbell v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint of dif- 
ference in reduction of rates for electric cooking and regular electric lighting. 
Adjusted. 

Moore Grocery and Milling Company v. Southern Power Company. Com- 
plaint as to electric meters and their registration. It appearing that the 
complainant buys power from the city which in turn buys it from the 
Southern Power Company, and the Commission having no jurisdiction 
therein, the case is dismissed. 

Virginia Electric and Power Company to the Commission. Electric rate 
schedules filed and approved by the Commission, subject to hearing upon 
complaint. 

Clinton Hardware Company v. Tidewater Power Company. Complaint 
of tapping fee charged for furnishing water at White Lake. Adjusted. 

Tidewater Power Company to the Commission. Rate for wholesale! 
current filed and approved by the Commission subject to hearing upon com- 
plaint. 

Citizens of Cabarrus County v. Coldwater Light & Power Company. 
Complaint of refusing to install certain service on lines. Adjusted. 

Thomas Powell v. Carolina Power and Light Company. Complaint of 
service connection. Adjusted. 

John A. Lancaster v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint of 
electric light service. Adjusted. 

Henry Clark Bridgers v. Newland Light and Power Company. Complaint 
of charge for service at Linville. Adjusted. 

Tidewater Power Company to the Commission. Revised residential com- 
mercial and industrial rates for Wrightville Beach and all consumers other 
than those on Wrightsvilles Beach; also Central house-heating, gas-fired 
boiler rates filed and approved, subject to hearing upon complaint. 

J. T. Underwood and Citizens of Liberty v. Carolina Power and Light 
company. Complaint of service. Adjusted. 

Town of Granite Falls v. Southern Power Company. Complaint of charge 
for power. Adjusted. 

Mrs. F. O. LaFevers v. Carolina Power and Light Company. Application 
for installation of service necessary for electric range. Service installed. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 73 

Snyder Credit Company v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint 
of charges for installation of service. Adjusted. 

Percy J. Olive v. Carolina Power and Light Company. Application for 
installation of lights in office. Adjusted. 

C. A. Hebert v. University Consolidated Service Plants. Complaint of 
refusal to return meter deposit. Adjusted. 

Marion Light and Power Company to the Commission. Minimum rate 
of $1.10 for 10 k. w. h. for lighting current, same being a reduction, is ap- 
proved for the town of Marion. 

Carolina Power and Light Company to the Commission. Schedule of 
rates for large textile mills class No. 3 and No. 4, being reduction in rates. 
Approved. 

H. V. Conly v. Tidewater Power Company. Complaint of service for 
Wilmington. Adjusted. 

M. P. Hite v. Elizabeth and Suburban Gas Company. Complaint of 
charges. Adjusted. 

Carolina Power and Light Company to the Commission. Schedule of 
rates for Feldspar Grinding Mills. Approved. 

Rocky Mount Mills to the Commission. Schedule of rates for lights and 
power furnished neighbors in Stony Creek township. Approved. 

Greensboro Full- Fashioned Hosiery Mills v. Public Utilities Company. 
Complaint of rates and service. Adjusted. 

North Carolina Public Service Company to the Commission. Application 
for discontinuance of rate schedule No. 10 being flat rate indicator service 
for the cities of Greensboro, Burlington and contiguous territory. Approved. 

Durham Gas Company to the Commission. Gas rates in effect in the 
City of Durham filed by Durham Gas Company, succeeding Carolina Power 
and Light Company. Approved. 

Carolina Power and Light Company to the Commission. Rates for large 
miscellaneous power service and temporary or seasonal miscellaneous large 
power service filed and approved. 

New River Light and Power Company to the Commission. Rates for 
residential and commercial lighting, street lights, cooking and power rates 
for motors filed and approved. 

Public Theater Corporation to the Commission. Complaint as to service 
for exit lights on separate meter. Dismissed. 

Carolina Power and Light Company to the Commission. Rates covering 
large miscellaneous intermittent power service filed. 

Tidewater Power Company to the Commission. Combination for residen- 
tial gas-fired boiler, including use of gas for all other residential purposes 
filed and approved. 

Frigidaire v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint of service. 

Carolina Power & Light Company to the Commission. Rural and suburban 
service rate filed and approved. 

Duke Power Company to the Commission. Schedule of rates for electric 
lighting service, electric fuel service, window lighting service and electric 
power service for the town of Marion filed and approved. 

Southern Public Utilities Company to the Commission. Rates on buses 
in the city of Winston-Salem filed and approved as follows : 7 cents cash 
fare, four tickets for 25 cents with transfer good for a continuous passage 



74 'N. C. Corporation Commission 

on street railroad to bus or bus to street railroad or bus to bus from one 
route to another route. 

J. Spillman v. Tidewater Power Company. Complaint of charges. Ad- 
justed. 

W. F. Carter v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint of sale 
of power for electric refrigeration. Dismissed. 

Tidewater Power Company to the Commission. Package freight schedule 
rates from Wilmington to Wrightsville Beach and immediate points. Filed 
and approved. 

Elizabeth City Public Utility Commission v. Virginia Electric Company. 
Complaint as to current. Adjusted. 

Carolina Gas and Electric Company to the Commission. Optional rates 
for residential gas service and additional rates for the towns of Fayette- 
ville, Goldsboro, Greenville, Kinston, New Bern and Washington, filed and 
approved. 

National Utilities Company of Statesville to the Commission. Gas rates 
for Marion and Statesville filed and approved. 

Elk Park Electric Light and Power Company and Newland Light and 
Power Company to the Commission. Schedule of rates for optional urban 
commercial lighting, electric refrigeration, cooking and heating and retail 
power service for the towns of Elk Park and Newland tiled and approved. 

Mangum Turner v. North Carolina Public Service Company. Complaint 
of gas and light service. Adjusted. 

Tidewater Power Company to the Commission. Schedule of revised re- 
sidential and commercial lighting rates for New Hanover county and sea- 
shore resorts (said rates being reductions in electric lights rates). Filed 
and approved. 

Carolina-Tennessee Power Company to the Commission. Amendment to 
rules and regulations concerning electric power. Approved. 

Carolina Power and Light Company to the Commission. Combination 
residential cooking, water heating and lighting service rates tiled and 
approved. 

TELEGRAPH COMPANIES 

IN RE PETITION OF THE WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY 
FOR AUTHORITY TO INCREASE RATES FOR TELEGRAPH SERV- 
ICE BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

Hearings were held on this petition on August 10th and 11th, 1926, and 
progressed to final argument August 23, 1927. Disposition of it has been 
delayed because the case for the petitioner was presented with such refine- 
ment of intricate theories of accounting that it had to wait until it could 
be given such consideration and analysis as would permit a satisfactory 
decision. 

On account of the intricacies of accounting methods introduced and the 
importance of the issue presented, the Commission arranged to employ ac- 
counting experts experienced in public utility accounting to investigate the 
testimony and exhibits presented. Herdrich and Boggs, of Indianapolis, 
were employed for this service. Their report has been of little assistance, 
a? it did not throw any additional light upon it, except as to minor details. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 75 

After careful analysis of the testimony, we have reached the conclusion 
that the petition should be denied ; and, inasmuch as the petitioner con- 
tends that its operations in North Carolina, with respect to its intrastate 
business, is conducted at an actual loss, it is entitled to have our finding 
supported by such analysis of the testimony as will sustain it. 

The existing rates for telegraphic service, both intrastate and interstate, 
were uniformly increased throughout the United States 20 per cent in 1919, 
by order of the Postmaster General, when the entire property of the tele- 
graph companies was being operated by the Federal Government. It is 
shown by the petitioner that many items of operating expenses have in- 
creased in greater proportion than that — it being shown that pay of oper- 
ators and employees in December, 1926, was 86 per cent greater than in 
December, 1915, together with increased costs of all materials that go into 
the rendering of telegraph service. It is also true of many lines of industry 
that increasing wage costs have been largely overcome by increased volume 
of business and by increased efficiency of machinery and appliances. This 
is peculiarly the case as to business of the Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany. 

For the year under review in the testimony in this case, 1925, the pe- 
titioner had developed automatic message recording instruments to the 
point that more than 80 per cent of all messages handled at stations on its 
trunk lines in this State, and 63.9 per cent of all messages handled in the 
State, were mechanically recorded by automatic machines, instead of hand- 
handled by the Morse Code. There has, also, been a continuing develop- 
ment of devices for multiple use of wire circuits, largely increasing the 
capacity of wires, so that increasing volume of traffic can be handled with- 
out corresponding increase of capital outlay for additional wire circuits 
and of expense of maintenance of same, and such multiple use of equip- 
ment is in general use. 

These facts tend to show that increased wage and material costs have 
been offset by increasing volume of business and by the development of more 
efficient and less expensive mechanical appliances used in its operations, and 
the general operating results of the petitioner demonstrate conclusively that 
that is true. While rates for its service have remained constant since 
1919, throughout the country, its net earnings, as a whole, in the United 
States have materially increased and are substantially greater than in 1919 
or 1915 or any previous period in its history. Of course, we are not trying 
the issue in this case upon earnings of the petitioner in the United States, and 
we only recite these outstanding facts because they demonstrate that a 
further increase in telegraph rates is not required by reason of increased 
costs of labor and materials. 

Coming now to the specific showing of the petitioner that its operating 
expenses in North Carolina, applicable to its handling of messages between 
points in North Carolina, was, for the year 1925, $38,301 greater than its 
receipts for this service and that including taxes and uncollectible revenue, 
the excess was $66,384.00. 

This conclusion is reached by special accounting methods, employed for 
this special purpose, and necessarily based upon accounting theories rather 
than upon an accounting of exact facts. So much is not said in criticism, 
for in the very nature of things, there could not be an exact separation and 



76 N. C. Corporation Commission 

accounting of the costs of all the operations that go into the handling of 
telegraph messages between points in North Carolina separate from the 
costs of handling interstate messages, when there is the constant inter- 
mingled employment of the same facilities and the same agents and em- 
ployees in the handling of both classes of business at the same time. Are 
the accounting methods relied upon by the petitioner in this case to make 
this intricate separation accurate, or sufficiently so to justify the conclusion 
it seeks? We do not think so. 

Before considering its general basis of allocating expenses against its 
intrastate business, we take up two specific items of expenses that are treated 
separately. There is charged entirely against intrastate operations an item 
of license taxes, $20,882.00. This refers to a privilege tax levied by Section 
206 of the Revenue Act on "every person, firm or corporation operating in 
this State the apparatus necessary to communication by telegraph * * * 
for the privilege of engaging in such business." The petitioner charges all 
of this tax against intrastate operations because there is a provision in the 
act that "nothing in this section shall be construed to authorize the im- 
position of any tax upon interstate commerce or any business transacted 
by the Federal Government," and because it is contended the State is without 
the power to levy a privilege tax chargeable against interstate transactions. 

If the theory of the petitioner with respect to this tax is correct, precisely 
the same theory would apply with equal validity to every tax paid by it 
either to the State or the counties, municipalities or special tax districts. 
None of these taxes are a "tax upon interstate commerce" within the legal 
meaning of that term, or within the constitutional prohibition. If held to 
be "a tax upon interstate commerce," they would immediately become in- 
valid. The same provision that is in the act levying this privilege tax is, 
by necessary inference, in every tax law enacted by the State, or for any 
of the units of government acting under its authority. But it does not occur 
to the petitioner to suggest that, because under the Constitution, none of 
these taxes may be "a tax upon interstate commerce," that, therefore, none 
of these taxes should be in pro rata part allocated as a part of the expenses 
of its interstate business transacted in this State. That a State may not 
levy a tax upon interstate commerce certainly does not mean that valid taxes 
levied by it may not become a part of the expense of carrying on interstate 
business. Such taxes are almost universally a part of the cost of doing 
interstate business. As a matter of course the General Assembly did not 
intend, in levying this privilege tax, to levy a tax upon interstate commerce. 
It was levying a tax upon the privilege of "operating within this State the 
apparatus necessary to communication by telegraph." The petitioner exer- 
cises that privilege and pays the tax : and. like all other taxes which in 
the course of its business it has to pay, including its Federal as well as State 
and local taxes, is allocable in proper ratio to all its business, both intra- 
state and interstate. This is the first time this principle of accounting, which 
we understand to be universally observed, has been questioned in any pro- 
ceeding before us. 

Another charge against intrastate revenue that we find it necessary to 
eliminate entirely is an item of $21,974 for handling intrastate messages at 
relay points outside of North Carolina. This charge is based upon a one-day 
check, showing a total of 1,308 intrastate messages relayed at Atlanta, Nor- 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 77 

folk, Richmond, Roanoke, Abingdon and Johnson City, each handled twice 
and multipled by three hundred days to show 784.800 handlings of such 
messages at an estimated average handling cost of 2.8 cents. It is excluded 
for the reason that if proper practice involves handling to this extent of 
intrastate messages at relay points outside the State, such practice would in 
turn involve handling at relay points in this State of intrastate messages 
in adjoining states in presumably equivalent numbers, and at costs of 
handling included in the expenses of operation in this State. It is also 
excluded for the reason we find from petitioner's exhibits there has already 
heen allocated against intrastate messages a sufficient number of handlings 
to cover the reasonable cost of handling such messages whether relayed 
at points within or without the State. 

Exhibit C-l-A shows results of a study made by petitioner to determine 
the average number of operator handlings of messages and the average 
cost of same. The conclusion reached was that the average intrastate mes- 
sage is handled 3.83 times at an average cost of 2.8 cents each. Considering 
that at least a substantial number of intrastate messages should be handled 
direct between local stations on the same line without relay, and involving 
only two handlings per message, it seems that 3.83 handlings per message 
at 2.8 cents per each handling is quite a liberal number to be charged against 
all purely local intrastate messages, including any relays that may be 
necessary at stations outside the State. 

Another element of the theoretical basis on which petitioner's case is 
made up, and which we find it difficult to follow, is its calculation of the 
average distances traveled within the State by intrastate and interstate 
messages. The average is shown to be 131.5 miles for intrastate messages 
and 76.3 miles within the State for interstate messages, and these factors 
represent a large part of the costs assigned against each class of business, 
including all maintenance and repairs of lines. 

Here, again, we are not dealing with what purports to be exact state- 
ments of fact, but with results "determined by a study of one month's mes- 
sages." This is all the information we have as to how these average dis- 
tances were arrived at. We find it difficult to follow a conclusion that an 
average interstate message travels only 70.3 miles in a State that averages 
five hundred miles long and nearly two hundred miles wide. The lines of 
the Western Union follow railroad rights of way. They have three main 
north and south trunk lines across the State following the trunk lines of our 
three main railway systems. The distance between extreme stations within 
the State on the Seaboard main line is 174 miles ; the Southern, 177 miles ; 
and the Coast Line, 189 miles. An interstate message originating at the 
half-way point on the shortest of these trunk lines would travel eighty- 
seven miles before passing the last railroad station inside the State, and 
fhe average half-way distance for these three trunk lines is ninety miles. 
So that, if the Western Union's business falls into the law of averages in 
this respect, its average message, originating on one of these main trunk 
lines, would travel more than ninety miles in the State before reaching a 
State line, and its business originating at points in the State not on these 
three main north and south trunk lines would add its distance to the trunk 
line to the ninety miles average. If the petitioner, based on a short term 
"study," instead of a complete and actual test of mileage on each message, 



78 N. C. Corporation Commission 

has arrived at an average mileage for interstate messages within the State 
less than the actual average, it has to that extent reduced expenses appli- 
cable to its interstate messages and increased to that extent the expenses 
applicable against its intrastate expenses. 

Without further consideration of details, we come now to consider a 
summing up of the petitioner's case. Its revenue in North Carolina is, in 
round figures, 75 per cent interstate and 25 per cent intrastate; but an 
intricate system of allocating each character of expense is employed which 
results in charging the 25 per cent of revenue with 33 per cent of expenses, 
and in addition to this intrastate is charged with all of its privilege taxes 
and an undue proportion of all other taxes. In some cases, the theory 
of mileage is used ; in others, the number of message handlings ; in others, 
the per message basis ; and in others, a combination of two or more of 
these theories, but always assigning to intrastate operations a percentage 
of cost substantially in excess of its percentage of revenue. We find that 
the petitioner does not itself approve this theoretical system of accounting 
in its allocation of its expenses as between states, or in its contractual 
relations with others. 

In the case before us, we find that the petitioner allocates to North Caro- 
lina its rateable proportion of general overhead expenses ; such as, super- 
vising expenses of commercial and traffic departments, and home and general 
office expenses, on the basis of "commercial telegraph tolls collected in each 
state" ; but, after that allocation is made to North Carolina and it comes to 
separate the amounts so allocated as between intrastate and interstate, 
that simple and exact method is abandoned ; and, in lieu of it, theoretical 
methods are set up which in every case allocate to intrastate operations 
a proportion of expenses much greater than its revenue proportion, and to 
interstate, much less than its revenue proportion. 

Again we find from petitioner's exhibits that its theoretical basis is not 
approved by it in its use in actual transactions where it has contractual 
relations with others. More than 10 per cent of its intrastate messages 
in this State are handled for it by railroad companies at stations where 
they do not have a separate telegraph office and to some extent they have 
contracts with hotels, stores and apartment houses. Contracts and actual 
payments for these services are on the basis of "commercial telegraph tolls 
collected." Its contract with the telephone company for collecting its revenue 
seems to be on the same basis. 

The petitioner uses this simple, consistent and exact method in its ac- 
counting as between states and in its contractual relations with others 
to perform its service for it ; but where it performs the service itself, it 
involves the whole question in interminable theories that result in each case 
in allocating to its intrastate business a proportion of expenses substan- 
tially greater than its proportion of revenue or commercial tolls collected. 
Where this service is performed for it under contract by operators at rail- 
road stations, the actual compensation is on a basis that allocates to in- 
trastate 26.5 per cent of the total, and to interstate, 73.5 per cent. Where 
the service is performed at Western Union offices, the allocation for the 
same service is 37.2 per cent against intrastate and 62.8 per cent to inter- 
state. Under such a theory of computing expenses, it can easily show not 
only a loss on its intrastate operations, but also that it would still operate 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 79 

its intrastate business at a loss even if the increased rates asked for should 
be granted. Indeed, under this theoretical system of allocating expenses, 
about the only way in which local telegraph rates could be made to show 
a satisfactory profit would be to raise them to the point where the cost of 
a local message would be equal to the cost of an average interstate mes- 
sage, . which, according to testimony of petitioner, is 68.5 cents per message 
and average distance 800 miles. To the extent that expenses are charged 
on a per message basis, this would be required, and the larger part of ex- 
penses in the case before us, even general overhead and supervisory ex- 
penses, are allocated substantially on this basis, or upon a basis which 
charges a thirty cents message with substantially as much expense as a one 
dollar message. 

It is not easily conceivable that any business would show a profit on its 
smaller transactions if it charged expenses against them on a unit basis 
instead of a percentage basis, or upon any other theory of accounting 
practice which accomplished substantially the same result. 

The Western Union Telegraph Company is a prosperous, well-managed 
company that is keeping up with the progress of the times and rendering 
efficient service in an important field of public service, but we do not find 
that it is entitled to a further increase in its rates. It is, therefore 

Ordered, That the petition be dismissed. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 8th day of February, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6360. 

IN THE MATTER OF PETITION OF THE WESTERN UNION TELE- 
GRAPH COMPANY FOR AUTHORITY TO INCREASE TELEGRAPH 
RATES FOR TELEGRAPH SERVICE BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH 
CAROLINA. 

Order Overruling Exception 

This matter coming on for consideration upon the exceptions filed by 
:he petitioner, Western Union Telegraph Company, and being considered 
upon the record and the exceptions, and the Commission, being of the opinion 
that said exceptions should be overruled. 

Now, Therefore, Exceptions filed, herewith, by Western Union Telegraph 
Company are hereby overruled and disallowed. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This the 13th day of April, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6360. 



Mrs. L. L. McNair v. Western Union Telegraph Company. Complaint of 
error in message. The matter was served on defendant company and no 
further complaint having been received from complainant, the Commission 
takes it for granted the matter is adjusted. 

W. C. Petty v. Western Union Telegraph Company. Complaint of ex- 
cessive charges of telegraph tolls at Blowing Rock. Adjusted. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES 

American Railway Express Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue agencies at Glendon and Merry Oaks. Granted 
as to Merry Oaks. 



80 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Petition to close 
agency at Skyland. Petition was filed after notice had been posted by the 
Southern Railway Company to the effect that it would operate Skyland 
as a non-agency station. However, application by Southern Railway Com- 
pany to make Skyland a non-agency station having been withdrawn this 
case is dismissed. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application to close 
agency at Millboro. Granted. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application to dis- 
continue agency at Jonesboro. Granted. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application for dis- 
continuance of agency at Prentiss. Granted. 

B. A. Bianchi v. American Railway Express Company and Southeastern 
Express Company. Complaint of refusal of defendant companies to make 
deliveries to school. Defendant company advises of revision in delivery 
and pick-up limits, resulting in adjustment of complaint. 

TELEPHONE COMPANIES 

PETITION OF THE SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH 
COMPANY FOR ADJUSTMENT OF LINE MILEAGE CHARGES. 

Order 

Upon petition of the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company, the 
Commission has had under consideration mileage charges to apply in con- 
nection with main stations or private branch exchange systems which are 
located outside the base rate area but within the exchange area. 

It has been a long established custom by telephone companies and has been 
recognized by rate-making bodies over the country that the cost of special 
services should be borne by the subscribers to such special services. The 
present mileage charges have been in effect in the State of North Carolina 
for more than twenty-five years and were established before there was State 
regulation of such rates. At the time these rates were made applicable to 
this State, there was very little of this class of service furnished by the 
petitioner. Rural life has been made more attractive by the building of good 
roads, the use of automobiles, and the furnishing of the conveniences which 
heretofore have been available only to residents of cities. The cost of tele- 
phone line construction has more than doubled during the period in which 
the present rates have been in effect and because of the increased demand 
for exchange service beyond the base rate area, involving increased costs, 
the Commission feels that unless some adjustment of the mileage charges is 
made so that the additional cost of such construction may be borne by such 
subscribers, such additional cost will of necessity have to be borne by the 
great body of subscribers not receiving particular benefit from such special 
service. 

The petitioner requests that the mileage charge for individual lines, private 
branch exchange trunk lines, or ringing circuits per one-quarter mile or frac- 
tion thereof per month be increased from forty-two cents to sixty-three cents ; 
that the mileage charge for .two-party lines per one-quarter inile, or fraction 
thereof, per month, each main station, be increased from twenty-one cents to 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 81 

thirty-two cents; and that the mileage charge for four-party lines per one- 
quarter mile, or fraction thereof, per month, each main station, he increased 
from eleven cents to sixteen cents ; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be granted, to be effective at once covering such 
applications as may be received from this date ; and for such service as is 
now in operation, effective as of April 1, 1927. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 8th day of January, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6504. 

IN RE PETITION OF THE SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND TELE- 
GRAPH COMPANY FOR INCREASE OF LINE MILEAGE CHARGES 
AND AMENDING COMMISSION'S ORDER DATED JANUARY 8, 1927. 

Order 

Upon further consideration of the order made by the Commission, dated 
January 8, 1927, increasing the mileage rates of the Southern Bell Telephone 
and Telegraph Company, it is 

Ordered, That the said order of January 8, 1927, be amended by striking 
out the effective date therein, "April 1, 1927", and inserting in lieu thereof 
the effective date of June 1, 1927. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 19th day of April, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6504. 

IN RE PETITION OF CAROLINA TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COM- 
PANY FOR ADJUSTMENT OF TELEPHONE RATES ON ITS EX- 
CHANGE IN THE TOWN OF WILLIAMSTON. 

Order 

The Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company since acquiring this prop- 
erty has entirely rebuilt the outside plant and has installed modern common 
battery equipment. The petitioner presents a resolution, signed by the Mayor 
and Clerk of the Town of Williamston, which was passed by the Board of 
Aldermen, approving the rates requested ; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be granted and that the Carolina Telephone and 
Telegraph Company be authorized to charge on its Williamston exchange 
within the base rate area of one mile from the central office the following 
monthly rental rate, to-wit : 

Business, Special Line $3.50 

Business, Duplex Line 3.00 

Residence, Special Line 2.25 

Residence, Duplex Line 1.75 

The above rates shall be effective as of March 1, 1927. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 21st day of February, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6543. 



82 N. C. Corporation Commission 

IN RE PETITION OF CAROLINA TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COM- 
PANY FOR AN ADJUSTMENT OF TELEPHONE RATES ON ITS EX- 
CHANGE IN THE TOWN OF AHOSKIE, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

This is a petition of the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company for 
an adjustment of telephone rates in the Town of Ahoskie. The petitioner has 
entirely rebuilt its outside plant, installed common battery equipment, and 
has placed the same in good condition, thereby greatly improving the service. 
Attached to the petition filed with the Commission is a resolution, signed by 
the Mayor and passed by the Board of Aldermen of the Town of Ahoskie, 
approving the petition ; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be granted and that the Carolina Telephone and 
Telegraph Company be authorized to charge on its Ahoskie exchange within 
the base rate area of one mile from the central office the following monthly 
rental rates, to-wit : 

Business, Special Line $3.50 

Business, Duplex Line 3.00 

Residence, Special Line 2.25 

Residence, Duplex Line 1.75 

The above rates shall be effective as of March 1, 1927. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self. 

This 21st day of February, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6543. 

IN RE PETITION OF THE SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND TELE- 
GRAPH COMPANY FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF RURAL MULTI- 
PARTY LINE SERVICE AT ITS NORTH CAROLINA EXCHANGES. 

The petition of the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company is 
made for the establishment of Rural Multi-party Line Service within two 
miles of the base rate area of certain of its exchanges in North Carolina, as 
listed below, and inasmuch as this service does not now exist and there is a 
definite demand for it, it is 

Ordered, That the petitioner's request be granted and said petitioner is 
authorized to charge the following monthly rate : 

Within two miles, air line measurement, of the base rate area of certain 
of its exchanges in North Carolina, as listed below, rural multi-party line 
service is furnished at the following monthly rates : 

Business Residence Business Residence 

Asheville $3.75 $2.50 Statesville 2.75 2.00 

Greensboro 3.50 2.50 Shelby 2.75 2.00 

Raleigh 3.50 2.50 Reidsville 2.75 . 2.00 

Winston-Salem 3.50 2.50 Lumberton 2.50 2.00 

Wilmington 3.50 2.50 Lincolnton 2.50 2.00 

Salisbury 3.50 2.50 Morganton 2.50 2.00 

Gastonia 3.00 2.00 Newton 2.50 2.00 

Goldsboro 3.00 2.00 Cherryville 2.25 1.75 

Burlington 3.00 2.00 Kings Mountain 2.25 1.75 

Hendersonville 2.75 2.00 Rutherfordton 2.25 1.75 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 83 

Business Residence Business Residence 

Forest City 2.25 1.75 Caroleen 2.25 1.75 

Mr. Holly 2.25 1.75 Wendell 2.25 1.75 

Selma 2.25 1.75 Apex 2.25 1.75 

Belmont 2.25 1.75 Bessemer City 2.25 1.75 

Mt. Olive 2.25 1.75 Rowland 2.25 1.75 

Davidson 2.25 1.75 Fairmont 2.25 1.75 

Black Mountain 2.25 1.75 Sputhport 2.25 1.75 

Murphy 2.25 1.75 Gary 2.25 1.75 

Cleveland 2.25 1.75 Grover 2.25 1.50 

Wrightsville 2.50 2.00 Troutman 2.75 2.00 

Maiden 2.25 1.75 Waco 2.25 1.50 

Zebulon 2.25 1.75 

Beyond two miles, air line measurement, of the base rate area of the 
exchanges listed above, a mileage charge of 25c per mile, or fraction thereof, 
applies to each main station. 

Rural multi-party line service is furnished only when the Company has 
space available on existing pole routes. All lateral routes and circuits thereon 
for connection with the Company's main line are to be furnished and main- 
tained by the applicant. The Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Com- 
pany will furnish the telephone instruments. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self. 

This 31st day of March. 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6531. 

IN RE PETITION OF THE RANDOLPH TELEPHONE COMPANY FOR 
THE ESTABLISHMENT OF TELEPHONE RATES FOR THE TOWN OF 
FRANKLINVILLE AND VICINITY. 

Order 

The Randolph Telephone Company has installed automatic telephone serv- 
ice in Ramseur and has two circuits to Franklinville. which should provide a 
much better service than previously furnished. There has been a great deal 
of controversy about the condition of telephone service at Franklinville for 
some time and we hope that the improvements installed will meet the demand ; 
therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be granted and that the Randolph Telephone 
Company be authorized to charge the following monthly rental rates on each 
telephone set in Franklinville and vicinity, to-wit : 

Business telephones $2.00 

Residence telephones 1.50 

The provisions of this order are to become effective May 1, 1927. 

By order of the Commission : r. o. Self. 

This 20th day of April, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6544. 

IN RE DUPLIN TELEPHONE COMPANY, OF WARSAW, NORTH CARO- 
LINA, AND A. P. COOPER, INDIVIDUALLY AND AS MANAGER OF 
SAID COMPANY. 

Order 
You, and each of you, are hereby notified and enjoined under and by 
authority of law to show cause before the Corporation Commission of North 



84 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Carolina at this office in the City of Raleigh, in the State of North Carolina, 
on Friday, the third day of June, 1927, at 11 :00 o'clock A. M., why telephone 
service should not be furnished in accordance with the rules of said Com- 
mission, and especially to one, Dr. Newberry, of Warsaw. 

Upon failure to show cause, as above stated, order will issue requiring such 
service ; and for failure to comply therewith, penalties provided by statute 
will be imposed. 

Copy of this order is hereby ordered to be mailed to the Duplin Telephone 
Company, A. P. Cooper, Manager of the Duplin Telephone Company, and to 
Dr. Newberry, all of Warsaw, North Carolina. 

Of this notice, take due notice and fail not. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self. 

This 30th day of May, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6548. 

IN RE APPLICATION OF THE SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND 
TELEGRAPH COMPANY FOR AUTHORITY TO ESTABLISH AN EX- 
CHANGE RATE AT SEDGEFIELD, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

Upon application of the above named petitioner authority is asked to 
establish a Telephone Exchange at Sedgefield, North Carolina, where there 
is now no exchange, and to establish rates for service on said proposed 
exchange. 

Ordered, That the Petitioner be and is hereby authorized to establish an 
exchange at Sedgefield, North Carolina, and charge for service thereon the 
following monthly rental rates : 

A. Within the Base Rate Area, i. e., a radial distance of one mile from 
the Sedgefield control office, flat rates are quoted as follows : 

Individual 2-Party J^-Party 

Line Line Line 

Business $4.50 $4.00 

Residence 2.75 2.25 

B. Outside the area indicated in "A" and within the territory regularly 
served by primary classes of service, the following rates apply, together with 
established mileage charges as specified in the General Exchange Tariff: 

Individual 2-Parfy Jf-Party 

Line Line Line 

Business $4.50 $4.00 

Residence 2.75 2.25 

Rural Multi-Party Line Service : 

Rural multi-party line service shall be furnished, where the petitioner has 
pole lines, at the monthly rates given in the petitioner's local exchange, or 
provided the subscriber will, at his own expense, construct and maintain a 
circuit to a pole route of the petitioner. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 85 

Within two miles air line measurement of the Sedgefield. N. C, Base Rate 
Area, multi-party line service is furnished at the following monthly rates : 

Business $2.75 

Residence 2.25 

Beond two miles air line measurement of the Sedgefield Base Rate Area, a 
mileage charge of 25c per mile or fraction thereof applies to each main 
station. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 10th day of June, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6556. 

NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION COMMISSION 

IN RE PETITION OF THE SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND TELE- 
GRAPH COMPANY FOR THE AUTHORIZATION OF SEASONAL EX- 
CHANGE SERVICE RATES AT WAYNES VILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

This is a petition hy the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company 
for the authorization of seasonal exchange service rates to be charged at 
its Waynesville. North Carolina, exchange; and, as no seasonable exchange 
service rates have heretofore been established ; it is, 
Therefore 

Ordered. That the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company is 
hereby authorized to charge the following rates effective from date of issue 
of this order : 
Seasonal Service : 

Service for the season period of six months or less is furnished at the 
following monthly rates : 
A. Within Base Rate Area : 

Individual 2-Party h-Party 

Line Line Line 

Business $5.25 $4.50 

Residence 3.37 3.00 2.62 

B. Outside the area indicated in "A" and within the territory regularly 
served by primary classes of service, the following rates apply, together with 
established mileage charges as specified in the General Exchange Tariff: 

Individual 
Line 

Business $5.25 

Residence 3.37 

All exchange service charges are payable in advance for the full season 
period. The minimum charge is that for six months' service. Regular monthly 
rates as quoted in the local Exchange Tariff apply for service retained for 
any period in excess of the season period. 

By order of the Commission : r. o. Self, 

This 2nd day of July, 1927. Cleric. 

Docket No. 6562. 



l-Party 


4-Party 


Line 


Line 


$4.50 




3.00 


2.62 



l-Party 


Jf-Party 


Line 


Line 


$4.50 




2.62 


2.25 



86 N. C. Corporation Commission 

IN RE PETITION OF THE SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND TELE- 
GRAPH COMPANY FOR THE AUTHORIZATION OF SEASONAL EX- 
CHANGE SERVICE RATES AT HENDERSONVILLE, NORTH CARO- 
LINA. 

Order 

This is a petition by the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company 
for the authorization of seasonable exchange service rates to be charged at 
its Hendersonville, North Carolina, exchange ; and, as no seasonal exchange 
service rates have heretofore been established ; it is, therefore 

Ordered, That the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company is 
hereby authorized to charge the following rates effective from date of issue 
of this order: 
Seasonal Service : 

Service for the season period of six months or less is furnished at the 
following monthly rates : 

A. Within the Base Rate Area : 

Individual 
Line 

Business $5.25 

Residence 3.37 

B. Outside the area indicated in "A" and within the territory regularly 
served by primary classes of service, the following rates apply, together with 
established mileage charges as specified in the General Exchange Tariff : 

Individual 
Line 

Business ! $5.25 

Residence 3.37 

All exchange service charges are payable in advance for the full season 
period. The minimum charge is that for six months' service. Regular monthly 
rates as quoted in the local Exchange Tariff apply for service retained for any 
period in excess of the season period. 

By order of the Commission : - R. O. Self. 

This 24th day of August, 1927. Cleric. 

Docket No. 6581. 

IN RE PETITION OF THE HORTON TELEPHONE COMPANY FOR 
PERMISSION TO INCREASE TELEPHONE RATES IN THE TOWN OF 
MOUNT AIRY, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

The petition of the Horton Telephone Company for permission to increase 
telephone rates in the Town of Mount Airy was presented to the Commission 
some time ago and was returned to the peitioner with advice that he take 
the matter up with the officials of the Town of Mount Airy for consideration 
and agreement, if possible. The petition is now returned to the Commission 



2-Party 


It-Party 


Line 


Line 


$4.50 




2.62 


2.25 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 87 

with the endorsement of the Merchants Association and the Kiwanis Club 
and also the approval of the city officials of the Town of Mount Airy, as 
evidenced in a letter, dated August 20, 1927, signed by Mr. F. M. Poore, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer of said Town of Mount. Airy. 

The application for change in rates is based on the change from magneto 
to common battery service and general improvement in exchange service 
facilities. 

The Commission has given consideration to the proposed rates and finds 
that they are not out of line with rates on similar exchanges located in other 
towns ; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be granted and that the petitioner be authorized 
to charge as a monthly rental rate on its several classes of phones, effective 
September 1, 1927, the following rates, to-wit : 

$4.00 per month for straight line business telephones. 

$3.50 per month for two-party line business telephones. 

$2.50 per month for straight line residence telephones. 

$2.00 per month for two-party line residence telephones. 

$1.75 per month for three, four, or more party line residence telephones. 

$0.75 per month for each business extension telephone. 

$0.50 per month for each residence extension telephone. 

The trunk line rate shall not exceed twice the business rate. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 29th day of August, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6583. 

BEFORE THE 
NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION COMMISSION 

IN THE MATTER OF THE ACQUISITION BY SOUTHERN BELL TELE- 
PHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY OF ALL OF THE PHYSICAL 
AND TANGIBLE TELEPHONE PROPERTIES OF THE WATAUGA 
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY LOCATED AT AND CON- 
TIGUOUS TO THE CITY OF BOONE, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

Whereas, application has been made to said Corporation Commission for 
its consent and approval of the sale of all of the physical and tangible tele- 
phone properties now owned and operated by the Watauga Telephone and 
Telegraph Company, located and situated in the County of Watauga, State 
of North Carolina, consisting of its telephone exchange at Boone, North Caro- 
lina, together with all telephone exchange lines connected therewith, including 
that exchange line extending from Boone to Vilas and Valle Crusis and beyond 
into the said County of Watauga, to the Southern Bell Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company, and for the said Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company to charge for its telephone service the schedule of rates and charges 
hereinafter set forth : 

It is Ordered, That said sale of the above described telephone property, 
owned and operated by said Watauga Telephone and Telegraph Company, be, 
and the same is hereby consented to and approved : 

It is Further Ordered. That upon acquiring the legal title to the afore- 
said property of the Watauga Telephone and Telegraph Company, the South- 



88 N. C. Corporation Commission 

ern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company is hereby authorized, and shall 
have the right to charge for its exchange telephone service at Boone, North 
Carolina, the following schedule of rates, to-wit: 

BOONE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Local Exchange Tariff 
Regulations 

1. Except as otherwise provided, the rates and regulations contained in 
the General Exchange Tariff on file with the North Carolina Corporation 
Commission are made a part of this Local Exchange Tariff. 

2. The rates specified herein, with mileage charges when applicable, entitle 
subscribers to an unlimited number of messages to all stations bearing the 
designation of a Boone Central Office. 

Rates and Their Application 

A. Within the Base Rate Area. i. e., the corporate limits of Boone, as of 
November 1, 1927, flat rates are quoted as follows : 

Individual 2-Party 
Line Line 

Business $3.00 $2.50 

Residence 2.00 1.50 

B. Outside the area indicated in A and within the territory regularly 
served by primary classes of service, the following rate, apply together with 
established mileage charges as specified in the General Exchange Tariff: 

Individual 2- Party Rural 

Line Line Line 

Business $3.00 $2.50 $2.25 

Residence 2.00 1.50 1.75 

C. Throughout the Exchange Area : 

The rates for service and equipment not specifically shown in this Local 
Exchange Tariff are given in. the General Exchange Tariff. Where the Gen- 
eral Exchange Tariff gives more than one schedule for the same class of 
service or equipment, the schedule which applies in this exchange is indi- 
cated in the following table : 

General Exchange 
Tariff 
Class of Service Section Schedule 

Auxiliary Line (Inward) 15 2 

Joint User 19 2 

Farmers' Line, Class A 9 G 

Farmers' Exchange, Class C 9 6 

Done and Ordered, By the North Carolina Corporation Commission in 
session at their office in the City of Raleigh, North Carolina, this 4th day of 
November, 1927. 

R. O. Self, 
Docket No. 6608. Clerk. 

IN RE APPLICATION OF THE CHAPEL HILL TELEPHONE COMPANY 
FOR PERMISSION TO INCREASE TELEPHONE RATES IN THE TOWN 
OF CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Order 
The Board of Aldermen of the Town of Chapel Hill, after consideration of 
improvement of telephone facilities in the Town of Chapel Hill and after 






Decisions and Adjustments op Complaints 89 

•considering the greater cost such improved service will be to subscribers, has 
selected the automatic type of telephone service. The telephone situation in 
Chapel Hill has been under consideration for some time and it appears that 
individuals, the town collectively, and the University, are not pleased with 
the present service and have been diligently seeking some relief. The appli- 
cant, the Chapel Hill Telephone Company, now is of the opinion that relief 
will be found in the automatic system, and it has been agreed that when the 
automatic system has been installed that the company shall have a substantial 
increase in rates ; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the Chapel Hill Telephone Company be, and is hereby, 
authorized to charge the following monthly rental rates for telephone service, 
effective when the system has been installed and is in use : 

Business straight line $5.25 

Business party line 3.75 

Residence straight line 3.25 

Residence party line 2.50 

Extensions 1.00 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 28th day of November, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6621. 

IN RE APPLICATION OF THE HICKORY TELEPHONE COMPANY FOR 
AN INCREASE IN RATES. 

Order 

This is a petition of the Hickory Telephone Company for an increase in 
telephone rates on its Hickory Exchange. This petition was filed on October 
11, 1927, and was set for hearing, and heard on November 15. 1927, at 10 
o'clock in the Commission's office at Raleigh. N. C. At the time of the hearing 
a telegram was received from the City Manager of Hickory requesting that 
action be deferred thereon, until the citizens of Hickory had an opportunity 
to be heard. The company presented its case and the Commission addressed 
a letter on November 16, 1927, to City Manager Yoder, advising that the 
Commission would be glad to hear any of the citizens of Hickory in regard 
to the matter before it ; no reply has been received to this letter. 

The financial status of the petitioner is not difficult to ascertain. At the 
time the application was made it had one thousand three hundred and nine- 
teen (1,319) various classes of telephones and at the present rate, its gross 
monthly revenue was three thousand one hundred twenty-seven dollars and 
seventy-five cents ($3,127.75) per month. The proposed rate would give it 
three thousand six hundred ninety-nine dollars and fifty cents ($3,699.50), 
or an increase of five hundred seventy-one dollars and seventy-five cents 
($571.75) per month. 

From the evidence presented it appears that the petitioner is earning on its 
investment about 4.6 per cent and from the present day demand of subscribers 
for standardized telephone service, it is evident that the petitioner cannot 
give satisfactory standardized service on this earning. Hickory is a town 
of considerable length, built up along the railroad and because of this fact 
it necessitates cables being run a great distance from its exchange and this 



90 N. C. Corporation Commission 

class of construction is the most expensive which the telephone companies 
have, therefore, it is 

Ordeked, That the petition be granted, effective January 1, 1928, and the 
following classes of service on the Hickory Telephone Company's exchange 
shall be rendered at the following monthly rental rates : 

Business Special $5.00 

Two-party business 4.00 

Four-party business 3.50 

Residence Special 3.00 

Two-party residence 2.25> 

Four-party residence 2.00' 

Business extension 1.50> 

Residence extension •. 1.00- 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 20th day of December, 1927. Clerk: 

Docket No. 6598. 



IN RE PETITION OF CAROLINA TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH 
COMPANY FOR INCREASE IN RATES OF SEVERAL EXCHANGES. 

Order 

The petitioner, the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company, asked for 
an increase in telephone rates in the towns of Norlina, Franklinton, Plymouth, 
Murfreesboro and Snow Hill because such exchanges have been recently 
changed from magneto to automatic. 

The petition has attached thereto approvals from the town authorities of 
Norlina, Franklinton, Plymouth, Murfreesboro and Snow Hill approving a 
rate of $4.00 per month for Business, Special Line; $3.00 per month for 
Business, Duplex Line; $2.75 per month for Residence, Special Line, and 
$1.75 per month for Residence, Duplex Line. 

Because of the size of these exchanges it is thought that $4.00 per month 
straight single line business service is somewhat in excess of what the Com- 
mission has been accustomed to allowing for such exchanges. Because of 
the new construction and the standardized service of such construction the 
Commission finds nothing wrong with the remainder of the rate requested 
and approved by such city official ; it is therefore 

Ordered, That the petition be granted and that the following monthly rental 
rates shall be charged within a mile base rate area of the exchanges at 
Norlina, Franklinton, Plymouth, Murfreesboro and Snow Hill, effective Janu- 
ary 1, 1928 : 

Business, Special Line $3.50 per month 

Business, Duplex Line 3.00 per month 

Residence, Special Line 2.75 per month 

Residence,^ Duplex Line 1.75 per month 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 21st day of December, 1927. Clerks 

Docket No. 6633. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 91 

IN RE PETITION OF THE CAROLINA TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH 
COMPANY FOR AN INCREASE IN RATES IN THE TOWN OF WIND- 
SOR, NORTH CAROLINA. 

« Order 

This is a petition pursuant to the resolution passed by the municipal 
authorities of the town of Windsor authorizing a change in rates when the 
petitioner had installed an automatic telephone exchange in said town. That 
(exchange has now been installed and so far as this office is advised is in 
operation. 

The petitioner asks for a rate of $4.00 per month for special business line, 
which was approved by the city authorities. The Commission is of the opinion 
that this is somewhat out of line of what similar exchanges charge ; there- 
fore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be granted as hereinafter amended, and that 
the monthly exchange rental rate in the town of Windsor, North Carolina, 
effective January 1, 1928, shall be: 

Business, Special Line $3.50 per month 

Business, Two-Party Line 3.00 per month 

Residence, Special Line : 2.75 per month 

Residence, Two-Party Line 1.75 per month 

These rates shall be applicable to all subscribers within the base rate area 
of one mile from the central office exchange. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 28th day of December, 1927. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6637. 

LN RE PETITION OF THE MOCKSVILLE TELEPHONE COMPANY FOR 
PERMISSION TO INCREASE RATES ON ITS MOCKSVILLE EN- 
CHANGE. 

Order 

The petitioner, the Mocksville Telephone Company, makes application for 
permission to increase its special line, business telephone rates from $3.00 to 
$3.50 per month. Its rate for single line residence telephones at present is 
$1.75 : the petitioner asks that this rate be increased to $2.00 for residence 
desk sets only : no increase is requested for residence wall sets. The peti- 
tioner's estimated investment is between eight and nine thousand dollars. 

The town has a franchise tax of fifty cents per telephone irrespective of 
classification. The petitioner's requests are approved by the town officials. 

Night service is given at this exchange, but after ten o'clock at night the 
operator is signalled through a gong system attached to the exchange. 

It is doubtful whether or not the petitioner can keep up this telephone 
system in a standard manner even if the petition be granted : therefore, it is 

Ordered. That petition be granted, effective January 1, 1928. The petitioner 
is hereby authorized to charge on its Mocksville Exchange the following 
monthly rental rates : 

Single line business telephones $3.50 

Single line residence wall sets 1.75 

Single line residence desk sets 2.00 



92 N. C. Corporation Commission 

The petitioner does not ask for duplex rate for the reason that the exchange 
is of the magneto type, but it is thought by the Commission that the duplex 
rate would very materially increase the number of subscribers especially in 
the suburbs. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 3rd day of January, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6632. 

IN RE PETITION OF THE CENTRAL CAROLINA TELEPHONE COM- 
PANY AND THE CITY OF SILER CITY, NORTH CAROLINA. FOR AN 
INCREASE IN RATES ON THE SILER CITY TELEPHONE EXCHANGE. 

Order 

The City of Siler City, North Carolina, through its Mayor and Clerk, having 
petitioned the Corporation Commission on behalf of the Central Carolina 
Telephone Company for adequate telephone rates on the Central Carolina 
Telephone Company's Siler City exchange so as to permit the said telephone 
company to give the town twenty-four hour service, it is 

Ordered, That the Central Carolina Telephone Company is hereby author- 
ized to charge the following monthly rental telephone rates on its Siler City 
exchange, effective February 1, 1928 : 

Business Individual Line $3.50 

Business 2-party Line 3.00 

Business 4-party Line 2.50 

Residence Individual Line 2.25 

Residence 2-party Line 2.00 

Residence 4-party Line 1.75 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 31st day of January, 1928. Cleric. 

Docket No. 6646. 

IN RE PETITION OF B. L. FISHER, OWNER OF THE TELEPHONE 
EXCHANGE IN THE TOWN OF WALNUT COVE, N. C, FOR INCREASE 
IN RATES. 

Order 

Mr. B. L. Fisher, the owner of the telephone exchange in the town of Wal- 
nut Cove, has taken up with the officials of the said town the question of 
the installation of a magneto telephone exchange and desires that his rate 
schedules be adjusted, effective upon the completion of this work. The town 
is agreeable to the rates proposed and so advises the Commission through the 
Clerk and the Board of Aldermen of said town. 

The rates asked for by the petitioner and approved by the town are not 
exorbitant and the change in the exchange to the magento system will greatly 
improve the service. It is, therefore, 

Ordered, That the petitioner is hereby authorized to charge the following 
monthly rental rates on the Walnut Cove exchange, effective upon the com- 
pletion of the installation of the magneto telephone system : 

Business private line wall set a $3.25 per month 

Residence private line wall set 2.25 per month 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 93 

On lines to Danbury and other out-of-town lines the rates to be the 
same as above, but party line service. 

All desk sets to take 25c per month additional. 

Extension wall sets $0.75 per month 

Extension desk sets 1-00 per month 

All bills paid not later than the month in advance to have a rebate 
of 25c per month. No rebate on extension sets. 

No installation fee to be charged on telephones while plant is being 
built. After completion of plant, installation fee $3.50. 

Fees for removing from one location to another, if in the same build- 
ing $1.50, if in another building $3.50. 
By order of the Commission : R - O. Self, 

This 23rd day of February, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6648. 

IN RE PETITION CITIZENS TELEPHONE COMPANY, BREVARD, N. C, 
FOR A SEASONAL TELEPHONE RATE. 

Order 

This is a petition of the Citizens Telephone Company of Brevard, N. C, 
to establish a seasonal rate. The town of Brevard and vicinity is a summer 
resort and, as several thousand people go into that community in the summer 
and spend from three to four months, it has been proposed to the Commis- 
sion to grant seasonal rates wherever such conditions exist. Therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petitioner is hereby authorized to charge the following 
monthly rental rates to seasonal subscribers who take a telephone for six 
months, or less, .and do not become continuous subscribers at the end of the 
seasonal period : 

Business Single Line $5.50 

Business Party Line 4.50 

Residence Single Line 4.00 

Residence Party Line 3.50 

Effective from date of issue. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 23rd day of February, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6650. 

IN RE APPLICATION OF THE CENTRAL CAROLINA TELEPHONE 
COMPANY FOR AUTHORITY TO ESTABLISH AN EXCHANGE RATE 
AT SNOW CAMP, N. C. 

Order 

Upon application of the above named petitioner authority is asked to 
establish a Telephone Exchange at Snow Camp, N. C. where there is now 
no exchange service, and to establish rates for service on said proposed 
exchange. 

As indication of the need for telephone service at Snow Camp, the Com- 
mission is in receipt of a petition signed by citizens residing in Snow Camp 
and vicinity, in which they agree to subscribe for the number of telephones 
set opposite their names, to the number of 103 ; therefore, it is 



94 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Ordered, That the petitioner be and is hereby authorized to establish an 
exchange at Snow Camp, North Carolina, and charge for service thereon the 
following monthly rental rates : 

A. Within the Base Rate Area, i. e., one mile from the central office in 
Snow Camp, flat rates are quoted as follows : 

Individual 2-Party 
Line Line 

Business * $3.50 $3.00 

Residence . 2.25 1.75 

B. Outside the area indicated in A and within the territory regularly 
served by primary classes of service, the following rates apply, together with 
established mileage charges as specified in the General Exchange Tariff. 

Individual 2-Party f r Party Rural 

Line Line Line Line 

Business $3.50 $3.00 $2.50 $2.25 

Residence 2.25 1.75 1.50 1.50 

Farmers' Line (Subscribers to own and maintain line beyond base 
rate area and instruments ) $4.50* 

*The rate named for this class of service is for a maximum of six 
stations. Each station on the line in excess of six will pay 75c per month. 
By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 12th day of March, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6657. 

IN RE PETITION OF THE SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND TELE- 
GRAPH COMPANY FOR INCREASE IN RATES IN CONSIDERATION 
OF IMPROVEMENTS AT GROVER, N. C. 

Order 
Whereas, it appears to the North Carolina Corporation Commission that 
the citizens of Grover, North Carolina, as indicated by the following petition 
to the Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Company, now desire that Com- 
pany to make certain improvements in its plant and to furnish continuous 
.service, except that on Sunday the usual Sunday hours will be observed : 

SOUTHERN BELL TEL. & TEL. CO., 

Gastonia, N. C. 

We, the undersigned subscribers of the Southern Bell Telephone and 
Telegraph Company at the Grover, N. C, exchange, our signatures and 
names signed hereto, desiring better and more adequate telephone service, 
respectfully petition the Company as follows: 

With the understanding that a substantial further investment on the 
part of the Southern Bell Tel. & Tel. Company is to be made in the 
extension and improvement of the Grover system and that continuous 
day service and increased Sunday hour service, together with all night 
service will be extended and given to all subscribers of the Grover, N. C. 
exchange in addition to the present service, provided the subscribers will 
pay an additional small monthly rate of 25c for residence service and 50c 
per month on business service. 

We, said subscribers at Grover, N. C, exchange, herewith subscribe 
to the above conditions, and we agree to pay an increased monthly rental 
as set forth, on and after such improvements and additional service is 
rendered to us. Respectfully signed and submitted for your considera- 
tion ; and we trust that the Company will carry out at an early date the 
aforesaid improvements for the betterment of the service at this town. 
Our signatures attached hereto for said service. 

(Here follows the names of thirty-one persons.) 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 95 

It is, therefore, ordered by this Commission that in consideration of the 
foregoing, the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company is authorized 
to charge the following rates for its Grover, North Carolina, exchange tele- 
phone service from the first of the month next succeeding the completion of 
improvements and the furnishing of continuous service as herein men- 
tioned. 

Business individual line $3.50 

Business 2-party line 3.00 

Business 4-party line. 2.50 

Residence individual line , 2.25 

Residence 2-party line 2.00 

Residence 4-party line 1.75 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 13th day of June, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6693. 
IN RE PETITION OF THE SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND TELE- 
GRAPH COMPANY FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF RURAL MULTI- 
PARTY LINE SERVICE AT ITS NORTH CAROLINA EXCHANGES. 
The petition of the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company is 
made for the establishment of Rural Multi-Party Line Service within two 
miles of the base rate area of its exchanges in North Carolina, as listed 
below, and inasmuch as there is a definite demand for it, it is 

Ordered, That the petitioner's request be granted and said petitioner is 
authorized to charge the following monthly rates for Rural Multi-Party 
Line Service : 

Within two miles, air line measurement, of the base rate area of its ex- 
changes in North Carolina, as listed below : 

Exchange Business Residence Exchange Business Residence 

Asheville . $3.75 $2.50 Apex $2.25 $1.75 

Charlotte 3.75 2.50 Belmont 2.25 1.75 

Greensboro 3.50 2.50 Bessemer City 2.25 1.75 

Raleigh 3.50 2.50 Black Mountain 2.25 1.75 

Wilmington 3.50 2.50 Boone 2.25 1.75 

Winston-Salem 3.50 2.50 Canton 2.25 1.75 

Salisbury 3.50 2.50 Cary 2.25 1.75 

Clvde 3.50 2.50 Caroleen 2.25 1.75 

Arden 3.00 2.00 Cherryville 2.25 1.75 

Burlington 3.00 2.00 Cleveland 2.25 1.75 

Gastonia 3.00 2.00 Davidson 2.25 1.75 

Goldsboro 3.00 2.00 Fairmont 2.25 1.75 

Statesville 3.00 2.00 Forest City 2.25 1.75 

Troutman 3.00 2.00 Gibson 2.25 1.75 

Laurinburg 2.75 2.00 Kings Mountain 2.25 1.75 

Lenoir 2.75 2.00 Maiden 2.25 1.75 

Hamlet 2.75 2.00 Mt. Holly 2.25 1.75 

Hendersonville 2.75 2.00 Mt. Olive 2.25 1.75 

Reidsville 2.75 2.00 Murphy 2.25 1.75 

Rockingham 2.75 2.00 Newland 2.25 1.75 

Shelby 2.75 2.00 Rowland 2.25 1.75 

Taylorsville 2.75 2.00 Rutherfordton 2.25 1.75 

Blowing Rock 2.50 2.00 Selma 2.25 1.75 

Lincolnton 2.50 2.00 Spruce Pine 2.25 1.75 

Lumberton 2.50 2.00 Southport 2.25 1.75 

Morganton 2.50 2.00 Wendell 2.25 1.75 

Newton 2.50 2.00 Zebulon 2.25 1.75 

Stony Point 2.50 2.00 Grover 2.25 1.50 

Waynesville 2.50 2.00 Waco 2.25 1.50 

Wrightsville 2.50 2.00 



96 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Beyond two miles, air line measurement, of the base rate area of the ex- 
changes listed above, a mileage charge of 25c per mile, or fraction there- 
of, applies to each main station. 

Rural Multi-Party line service is furnished only when the Company 
has space available on existing pole routes. All lateral routes and circuits 
thereon for connection with the Company's main line are to be furnished and 
maintained by the applicant. The Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company will furnish the telephone instruments. 

This order supersedes this Commission's orders of February 12, 1926, 
covering Statesville, Taylorsville, Troutman and Stony Point ; April 1st, 
1926, covering Gibson, Hamlet, Laurinburg and Rockingham, N. C. ; May 
21st, 1926, covering Canton, N. C. ; July 21st, 1926, covering Charlotte, N. 
€).-, and March 31st, 1927, covering forty-three exchanges in North Carolina. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 30th day of June, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6696. 



IN RE PETITION OF THE LEE TELEPHONE COMPANY FOR ESTAB- 
LISHMENT OF RATES FOR AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE SERVICE 
ON ITS STONEVILLE EXCHANGE. 

Order 

This petition was presented to the Commission by Mr. T. C. Stone, of 
Stoneville, on behalf of the Lee Telephone Company. The rate asked for, 
after the establishment of an automatic exchange, is an increase of twenty- 
five cents per month per telephone. The change from the manual to auto- 
matic will give the town day and night service and the receipts from the 
whole operation are not adequate to give it this service with the manual 
system ; therefore, it it 

Ordered, That from and after the installation of the automatic equipment 
the Lee Telephone Company is hereby authorized to charge the following 
monthly rental rates : 

Business, one-party line, wall sets $4.25 

Business, two-party line, wall sets a 3.25 

Residence, one-party line, wall sets 2.75 

Residence, two-party line, wall sets 2.25 

All desk sets to take a rate of 25c more per month. 

All bills paid not later than the 10th of the month in advance to take 
a rate of 25c less per month. 

It is 

Further Ordered, That the manager of said company shall notify the 
Commission of the effecth^e date of these rates as per the above order. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 30th day of July, 1928. Clerk. 

Docket No. 6699. 



Decisions and Adjustments of Complaints 97 

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE CAROLINA TELEPHONE 
& TELEGRAPH COMPANY FOR A CHANGE IN EXCHANGE SERVICE 
RATES AT ST. PAULS, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

The Carolina Telephone & Telegraph Company makes application for an 
increase in telephone rates on its St. Pauls' Exchange, to be effective Sep- 
tember 1, 1928, for the reason that it has installed, and will have completed 
by that time, automatic equipment of the most modern type. In consideration 
of this installation the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen entered into an 
agreement with the petitioner that upon the completion of such facilities they 
would join the petitioner in asking for, and endorsing, the following rates : 

Business, Special Line $4.00 per month 

Business, Duplex Line 3.00 per month 

Residence, Special Line 2.25 per month 

Residence, Duplex Line 1.75 per month 

This new service will greatly enhance the value of the telephone conveni- 
ence to its patrons, therefore, it is 

Ordered, that, effective September 1, 1928, the Carolina Telephone and 
Telegraph Company is, hereby, authorized to charge the monthly rental rates 
set out above within the base rate area of one mile from the central office. 
Beyond this area rates will be as heretofore prescribed for the said petitioner's 
several exchanges. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 30th day of August, 1928. C7e>7v. 

Docket No. 6712. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 

Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Company to the Commission. Rates 
for Belmont, Bessemer City, Caroleen, Cherryville, Forest City, Gastonia, 
Grover, Kings Mountain, Lincolnton, Maiden, Mt. Holly, Newton, Ruther- 
fordton, Shelby and Waco, towns formerly served by the Piedmont Telephone 
and Telegraph Company, filed and approved. 

Sadie Mason v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Appli- 
cation for installation of telephone. Adjusted. 

J. G. Hanes and E. W. Kbontz v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company. Complaint of telephone facilities. Adjusted. 

B. F. Parker v. Pine Bluff Telephone Company. Complaint of toll rates. 
Dismissed. 

Norfolk & Carolina Telephone Company to the Commission. Charge of 
$1.00 for restoration of telephone service when service has been suspended 
for non-payment of charges. Approved. 

Coleridge Telephone Company to the Commission. Application for per- 
mission to abandon service and liquidate. Granted. 

F. D. Lewis & Sons v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone. Telephone installed. 



98 N. C. Corporation Commission 

C. T. Leonard v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Appli- 
cation for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Weaverville Mercantile Company v. Weaverville Telephone Company. Com- 
plaint of service. Dismissed. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. Com- 
plaint of service. Dismissed. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. Peti- 
tion for revision of rates for Wrightsville Local Exchange service and estab- 
lishment of toll rates for service between Wilmington and Wrightsville. Peti- 
tion withdrawn. 

Columbia Produce Exchange et al v. Cahoon Telephone Company. Com- 
plaint of long distance service. Adjusted. 

Mrs. Henry Paschall v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

T. K. Bowles v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Appli- 
cation for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

We tern Carolina Telephone Company to the Commission. Rates for Bryson 
City, Franklin and Sylva Exchanges filed and approved. 

Citizens Telephone Company v. Brevard Light and Power Company. Con- 
dition of power lines. Adjusted. 

R. H. Everett v. Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Company. Complaint 
of delay in removal of phone. Adjusted. 

Robinson R. Stabler v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for telephone service. Phone installed. 

L. Wooten v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint 
of increase in mileage rates. Adjusted. 

C. O. Lowe v. Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Company. Application 
for installation of telephone. Application having been made some time ago 
and the Commission not hearing further from complainant Commission as- 
sumes the matter has been adjusted. 

Lincoln L. Kellogg v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of telephone service. Adjusted. 

F. O. Chrysler v. Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Company. Appli- 
cation for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Southern Oil Company of North Carolina v. Heins Telephone Company. 
Complaint of increase in rates. Adjusted. 

L. S. Simmons v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of charges. Adjusted. 

L. Hilliard Gidney v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Dr. Wm. H. Drewry and others of Greenville v. Carolina Telephone and 
Telegraph Company. Complaint of telephone conditions in community of 
Grimesland. Adjusted. 

Ansonville Telephone Exchange v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company. Complaint of toll exchange agreement. Adjusted. 



Claims and Complaints 99 

Co-operative Telephone Company vs. Carolina Power and Light Company. 
Complaint of wire crossings. Adjusted. 

Seaboard v. Carolina Telephone & Telegraph Company. Installation of 
long distance service. It appearing that the establishment of a new exchange 
would require expenditure and the Commission being without authority to 
require such expenditure, case is dismissed. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. Re- 
quest for discontinuance of toll station at Midland. Granted. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. Re- 
quest for discontinuance of toll station at Rocky River Bridge. Granted. 

George W. Craig v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone. Adjusted. 

Carl P. Parker v. Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company. Applica- 
tion for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Citizens of Leicester v. Leicester Telephone Company. Complaint of service. 
Adjusted. 

W. W. Shumaker v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone. Telephone installed. 

H. C. Watkins v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Appli- 
cation for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Mrs. George L. Harrell v. Roanoke Chowan Telephone Company. Complaint 
of long distance service. The matter was taken up with the defendant com- 
pany and as some time has elapsed without having further complaint the 
Commission presumes the matter has been satisfactorily adjusted. 

E. C. Dickinson v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of service, charges, etc. Adjusted. 

J. Frank Houston v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of service. Adjusted. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. Ap- 
plication for discontinuance of toll station at Claremont. Granted. 

Vass v. Southern Pines Telephone Company. Complaint of charges for 
tolls. Dismissed. 

O. L. Williams v. Hyde County Telephone Company. Application for instal- 
lation of telephone. After personal discussion with representative of defend- 
ant company it appearing that more money was being paid out a month than 
was being received and that it was absolutely impossible for defendant to 
invest more in company, case is dismissed. 

J. C. Walker v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Appli- 
cation for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Alfred S. Barnard v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Establishment of exchange at Arden. Adjusted. 

Elon College v. Central Carolina Telephone Company. Complaint of charges 
for services. Adjusted. 

Jas. C. Jones v. American Telephone and Telegraph Companv. Application 
for installation of toll service at Rocky Point. It appearing to the Commis- 
sion that the long distance pay station had been in service at Rockv Point 



100 N. C. Corporation Commission 

on several occasions during the past five or six years but the company having 
had trouble as to keeping some one in charge and for that reason said pay 
station was removed, the case is dismissed. 

George W. Garland v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of service. Adjusted. 

Ellenboro Telephone Company to the Commission. In re contract with 
connecting companies. Adjusted. 

H. D. Swisher v. Pender Telephone Company. Complaint of long distance 
service. Adjusted. 

Dr. C. M. Cheadle v. Appalachian Telephone Company. Complaint of charge 
of additional 50 cents to monthly bill. Defendant company is advised that 
such charge should not be made. Case is dismissed. 

Fisher Telephone Company to the Commission. Rates for the town of 
Madison, Mayodan and Stoneville filed and approved. 

Southside Drug Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany. Complaint of service. Adjusted. 

Dixon Drug Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone. Adjusted. 

Virginia Ryan v. North State Telephone Company. Complaint of long dis- 
tance service. Adjusted. 

Monroe Telephone Company to the Commission. A charge of 50 cents addi- 
tional rate for installation of hand phone sets. Approved. 

Malloy Bros, and Balfour v. Parkton Telephone Company. Complaint of 
overcharge in rates. It appearing that the overcharge was for reverse mes- 
sages and the conditions involved being without jurisdiction of the Com- 
mission, case is dismissed. 

C. H. Heritage v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of charge for restoration of service. Adjusted. 

H.W. Holloway v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Over- 
charge on telephone service. Adjusted. 

CLAIMS HANDLED BY THE RATE DEPARTMENT OF THE NORTH 
CAROLINA CORPORATION COMMISSION FOR THE YEARS 1927 AND 

1928. 

Anderson-Clayton Company, W. S. Creighton T. M., Charlotte, N. C, refund 
of $41.00 on account of movement of cotton from Statesville to Concord, N. C, 
transited at Charlotte. Paid. 

B. F. D. Albritton & Co., Hookerton, N. C, overcharge on tobacco sticks from 
Vanceboro, N. C, to Hookerton, amount $15.98. Paid. 

B. F. D. Albritton & Co., Hookerton, N. C. overcharge on tobacco sticks 
from Vanceboro, N. C, to Hookerton, N. C, amount $16.62. Paid. 

Max Bane, Raleigh, N. C. alleged overcharge on old bags from Raleigh, 
N. C, to Norfolk, Va., amount $4.45. Claim denied. 

Bituminous Earth Road Corporation, J. R. Burch. T. M., Greensboro, N. C, 
overcharge on shipments of sand from Lilesville to Southport and Winnabow, 
N. C, rate of 56% cents. Adjusted. 



Claims and Complaints 101 

Borden Brick & Tile Co., Goldsboro, N. C., overcharge of $55.16 against 
East Carolina Railway Co., on tile from Sanford to Maury, N. C. Paid. 

W. H. Bowen, High Point, N. C, damage to sweet potatoes from Potters, 
N. C, to High Point, N. C, amount $52.10. Paid. 

E. W. Brawley, Mooresville, N. C, overcharge on shipments of fertilizer 
material from Wilmington to Mooresville, N. C, claim for $86.24 against 
S. A. L. Railway. Paid. 

M. T. Brickhouse, Columbia, N. C, claim against Norfolk Southern Rail- 
road Company for delay to shipment of potatoes from Columbia, N. C, to 
G. B. Booker, Wilmington, Delaware, amount $54.00. Paid. 

M. C. Butler, Mgr., Butler Brothers, Dunn, N. C, complaint in regard to 
switching at Dunn, N. C. Adjusted. 

Carr Lumber Company. Application of Southern Railway to make repara- 
tion of $48.94 on two cars of rails moving from Pisgah Forest to Etowah, N. C. 
Paid. 

Carnation Milk Products Company. Application of Atlantic Coast Line 
Railroad Co., to make reparation on shipments of condensed or evaporated 
milk, in cans, from Wilmington to Fayetteville, N. C. Application granted. 

Carnation Milk Products Co. Application of Atlantic Coast Line R. R. Co., 
to make reparation on shipments of condensed or evaporated milk, in cans, 
from Wilmington to Goldsboro, N. C. Application granted. 

Carnation Milk Products Co. Application of Atlantic Coast Line R. R. Co., 
to make reparation on shipments of condensed or evaporated milk, in cans, 
from Wilmington to Verona, N. C. Application granted. 

Carnation Milk Products Co. Application of Atlantic Coast Line Railroad 
to make reparation on shipments of condensed or evaporated milk, in cans, 
from Wilmington to Laurinburg, N. C. Application granted. 

Carolina Bagging Co., Henderson, N. C, overcharge of $2.52 against S. A. L. 
Railway on cotton ties from Portsmouth, Va.. to Ryes, N. C. Claim filed by 
Atlanta Freight Bureau. Paid. 

Carolina Fireproofing Co., Charlotte, N. C, reconsigning charge of $5.85 
on car of brick shipped from Gulf to Elkin and forwarded from there to 
W T inston-Salem, N. C. Denied. 

Cherokee Brick Co., Raleigh, N. C, overcharge of $22.54 on brick from 
Brickhaven, N. C, to Snow Hill, N. C. Paid. 

A. L. Cuthrell, Fairfield, N. C, overcharge on two cars of oat straw from 
Fairfield, N. C, to Richmond, Va., amount $48.26. Paid. 

Erwin Cotton Mills, Erwin, N. C. Application of Durham & Southern Rail- 
way Co., to make reparation on shipments of textile machinery from Cherry- 
ville, N. C, to Erwin, N. C, amount $16.10. Application granted. 

Florida Fruit Distributors, W. S. Creighton, T. M., Charlotte, N. C, refund 
of $20.00 assessed for furnishing refrigerator cars on shipments of potatoes 
from points on Norfolk Southern Railroad to Charlotte, N. C. Paid. 

Gordon Lumber Company. Application of Clinchfield Railroad to make 
reparation of $85.15 on lumber from Bowditch to Grovestone, N. C. Applica- 
tion granted. 



102 N. C. Corporation Commission 

J. M. Gregory & Co., A. S. Brown, T. M., reparation claim on contractor's 
outfit from Hendersonville to Rural Hall, N. C, amount $39.60. Paid Novem- 
ber 4, 1927. 

Hoke Oil & Fertilizer Co., Raeforcl, N. C, overcharge of $19.72 on car of 
cottonseed shipped from Bunnlevel to Wilson, N. C, and diverted at Lilling- 
ton to Raeford, N. C. Claim denied. 

The Interstate Amiesite Co., Wilmington, Delaware. Application of South- 
ern Railway to make reparation of $49.12 on shipment of crushed stone from 
Smyth, N. C, to Woodside, N. C. Application granted. 

James G. Ireland, Bayboro, N. C, overcharge against Norfolk Southern 
Railroad on 187 barrels of potatoes from Bayboro, N. C, reconsigned to 
Potomac Yards, Va., and diverted to Pier 29, New York City. Amount $13.46. 
Paid. 

K. B. Johnson & Sons. Fuquay Springs, N. C, overcharge on petroleum from 
Wichita Falls, Texas, to Fuquay Springs. Paid April 25, 1927. 

K. B. Johnson & Sons, Fuquay Springs, N. C, overcharge on petroleum from 
Wilmington, N. C, to Fuquay Springs, N. C, amount $206.97. Paid May 23, 
1927. 

Kerr Bleaching & Finishing Works. Application of Southern Railway to 
make reparation of $23.70 on cotton piece goods from Biltmore, N. C, to 
Concord, N. C. Application granted. 

Marks Brothers, Broadway, N. C, overcharge of $106.79 against S. A. L. 
Railway Co., on fertilizer material from Wilmington to Broadway, N. C. 
Paid. 

Roger Moore's Sons Co., Wilmington. N. C, overcharge on seven cars of 
hollow building tile from Claybrick. N. C, to Bolivia, N. C, amount $160.78. 
Ordered paid by Commission's order of April 4, 1928. 

North Carolina Chapter, Associated General Contractors of America, V. P. 
Eoftis, Executive Secretary, Charlotte, N. C, claims against Carolina and 
Northeastern Railway, amounts $54.13. $61.20, $38.53 and $9.64. Paid. 

Ornamental Stone Co., W. S. Creighton, T. M., Charlotte, N. C, overcharge 
on stone shipments between points in North Carolina, amount $455.71. Paid. 

Pine Hall Brick & Pipe Co. Application of Norfolk & Western Railway Co., 
to make reparation claim of $62.05 on five cars of common brick from Chis- 
man, N. C, to Ceramic, N. C. Application granted. 

Pomona Terra-Cotta Co.. R. S. Cooper, I. T. M., Greensboro, N. C, over- 
charge on car of sewer pipe from Greensboro to Elm City. N. C. Paid. 

Pomona Terra-Cotta Co., R. S. Cooper. I. T. M., Greensboro, N. C, over- 
charge on cars of sewer pipe from Greensboro to Rocky Mount and Tarboro, 
N. C. Paid. 

Raleigh Iron Works, J. Chas. Phelps, T. M., overcharge on radiators shipped 
from Buffalo, N. Y., to Colerain, N. C, amount $28.30. Paid. 

G. G. Ray & Co., W. S. Creighton, T. M.. alleged unreasonable charges on 
shipment of gravel from Lilesville, N. C. to Belmont Junction, N. C, amount 
$100.62. Paid. 



Claims and Complaints 103 

Southern Fruit Co., W. S. Creighton, T. M., Charlotte, N. C, refund on 
refrigeration of three cars of potatoes from Eastern North Carolina to Char- 
lotte, N. C, amount $15.00. Paid. 

Southern Fruit Co., W. S. Creighton, T. M., Charlotte, N. C, overcharge on 
grapes from Charlotte by express to Spruce Pine, N. C, amount $.36. Paid 
by American Railway Express Co. 

C. C. Sparrow, Aurora, N. C, alleged overcharge of $4.20 on potatoes from 
Grants, N. C, to Potomac Yards, Va., reconsigned to Baltimore, Md. Denied. 

Emerson Thomas, M. E. Orphanage, Raleigh, N. C. Refund on unused por- 
tion of ticket from Rockingham to Raleigh, N. C, amount $3.71. Paid. 

Tucker & Laxton, W. S. Creighton, T. M„ Charlotte, N. C, refund on basis 
of 50 cents per net ton on cinders from University to Durham, N. C. Amount 
$117.81. Paid. 

Union Provision Co., Raleigh, N. C, complaint of misrouting of eggs from 
Benson, N. C, to Raleigh. Adjusted. 

H. M. Wade Mfg. Co., W. S. Creighton, T. M., Charlotte, N. C, overcharge 
on store fixtures from Charlotte, N. C, to Raleigh, N. C, amount $96.63. 
Paid. 

H. M. Wade Mfg. Co., W. S. Creighton, T. M., Charlotte. N. C, overcharge 
on store fixtures from Charlotte to Raleigh, N. C, amount $48.75. Paid. 

H. M. Wade Mfg. Co., W. S. Creighton, T. M., Charlotte, N. C, overcharge 
on store fixtures from Charlotte to Biltmore, N. C, amount $27.50. Paid. 

H. M. Wade Mfg. Co., W. S. Creighton, T. M., Charlotte. N. C, overcharge 
on store fixtures from Charlotte to Rocky Mount, N. C, amount $56.50. Paid. 

H. M. Wade Mfg. Co., W. S. Creighton, T. M., Charlotte, N. C, overcharge 
on store fixtures from Charlotte to Wilmington, N. C, claim denied. 

H. M. Wade Mfg. Co., W. S. Creighton, T. M.. Charlotte, N. C. overcharge 
on store fixtures from Charlotte to Wilmington, N. C. amount $6.88. Claim 
declined. 

H. M. Wade Mfg. Co., W. S. Creighton, T. M., Charlotte, N. C, overcharge 
on store fixtures from Charlotte to Greensboro, N. C, amount $26.97. Paid. 

Western Carolina Lumber & Timber Association, H. B. Kyles, T. M., appli- 
cation of Southern Ry. to make reparation of $264.90 on rail from Ela, N. C, 
to Waynesville, N. C. Application granted. 

Western Carolina Lumber & Timber Association, H. B. Kyles, T. M., appli- 
cation of Southern Ry. to make reparation of $969.65 on rails from Pisgah 
Forest to Etowah. N. C. Application granted. 

Western Carolina Lumber & Timber Association, H. B. Kyles, T. M., appli- 
cation of Clinchfield Railroad Co. to make reparation of 1 cent per 100 lbs., 
on lumber from Bowditch to Maiden, N. C. Application granted. 

Western Carolina Lumber & Timber Association, H. B. Kyles, T. M. Appli- 
cation of Clinchfield Railroad Co. to make reparation on lumber from Bow- 
ditch to Grovestone, N. C, amount $85.15. Application granted. 

Western Carolina Lumber & Timber Association, H. B. Kyles, T. M. Appli- 
cation of Southern Ry. to make reparation on lumber from Sunburst to 
Waynesville, N. C, amount $142.04. Application granted. 



104 N. C. Corporation Commission 

BUS COMPANIES 

IN RE CANCELLATION OF FRANCHISE CERTIFICATE NUMBER 183, 
ISSUED TO J. W. BLEVINS, MOUNTAIN CITY, TENNESSEE, FOR THE 
OPERATION OF A PASSENGER BUS LINE BETWEEN WEST JEFFER- 
SON, NORTH CAROLINA, AND THE NORTH CAROLINA-TENNESSEE 
STATE LINE, DESTINATION TRADE, TENNESSEE. 

Order 

Pursuant to certain notices to one J. W. Blevins that unless lie showed 
cause on or before May 1, 1927, why his franchise certificate should not be 
cancelled for abandoning his bus line between West Jefferson and the North 
Carolina State Line, near Trade, Tenn., the Commission having under con- 
sideration such' correspondence and no word or reply having been received 
from in regard thereto ; it is, 

Ordered, That Franchise Certificate No. 183 is hereby cancelled. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 1st day of May. 1927. Clerk. 

IN RE CANCELLATION OF LICENSE CERTIFICATE NO. 154, ISSUED 
TO W. B. BLADES, NEW BERN, NORTH CAROLINA, FOR PASSENGER 
BUS OPERATION BETWEEN BEAUFORT AND ATLANTIC VIA MAR- 
SHALBURG, DAVIS AND SEA LEVEL. 

Order 

License Certificate No. 154 was issued to W. B. Blades for passenger bus 
operation between Beaufort and Atlantic and the operation under this cer- 
tificate has never been satisfactory. The manager of the line, Mr. Gunder- 
son, and Mr. Blades, appear not to have sufficient personal contact to operate 
the line intelligently and for the past six months the cars being operated on 
the line have not been the cars on which insurance was carried and which 
was on file in this ofiice. Mr. Cates, of the Department of Revenue, has from 
time to time visited Mr. Blades with a view to getting the matter straightened 
out and secure the payment of taxes due to be paid on the operation. No 
tax has ever been paid to the State under this operation ; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That, for the above reasons, License Certificate No. 154 is hereby 
cancelled and the two hundred dollar deposit originally made as a good faith 
guarantee for the payment of - tax is hereby ordered to be applied on the 
amount of tax due to be paid. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 9th day of May. 1927. Clerk. 

IN RE PETITION OF THE MOTOR TRANSPORTATION COMPANY OF 
THE SOUTH FOR AUTHORITY TO TRANSPORT PASSENGERS BY 
BUS BETWEEN RUTHERFORDTON, CHIMNEY ROCK, LAKE LURE, 
BAT CAVE AND INTERMEDIATE POINTS. 

Order 
The Motor Transportation Company of the South is a subsidiary corpora- 
tion of the Seaboard Air Line Railway Company and the pending petition is 
made as a part of a comprehensive plan of furnishing through Pullman car 



Claims and Complaints 105 

service between the resort sections of the east and west coasts of Florida 
and from Wilmington, North Carolina, to the resort sections in the western 
end of Rutherford County and the eastern end of Henderson County, or to 
Lake Lure, Chimney Rock and Bat Cave. It is proposed by the Seaboard 
Air Line Railway Company to operate three Pullman cars per week from 
Miami and Palm Beach, three Pullman cars per week from St. Petersburg 
and Tampa, Florida, and a daily Pullman car from Wilmington, North Caro- 
lina, to the terminus of the Seaboard's road at Rutherfordton, North Caro- 
lina, during the summer season and also furnishing dining car service on the 
trains which will handle these cars. In the inauguration of this service it is 
the expectation of the Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to develop a 
considerable summer tourist travel over its lines to the points mentioned; 
and in order to complete this service, it is the desire of the Seaboard Air Line 
Railway Company, through its subsidiary corporation, the Motor Transpor- 
tation Company of the South, to operate a connecting service between the 
trains which handle these Pullman cars and the principal points in the resort 
section above-named. It is, also, the purpose of the Seaboard Air Line Rail? 
way Company to establish agencies in the resort section mentioned to sell 
through tickets and check baggage at those points for railroad destinations 
on its own lines or any other railway lines throughout the country. 

The points which the petitioner proposes to reach with its subsidiary bus 
line constitute one of the most attractive resort sections in Western North 
Carolina and points at which immense sums of money have been spent in 
developing pleasure resort facilities within recent years. The greatest handi- 
cap to this section has been its lack of through transportation facilities for 
the convenient handling of long distance passengers. The service now pro- 
posed to be inaugurated will supply this convenient means of through travel 
and will, therefore, be of great benefit in the further development of this 
resort section and of great convenience to through passengers who may desire 
to reach this section over the Seaboard Air Line Railway. The proposed 
service will also be of great benefit to points on the Seaboard Air Line Rail- 
way intermediate between Charlotte and Rutherfordton in that it will fur- 
nish through the tourist season at least a Pullman service that has not been 
available over this line. 

The granting of the petition is resisted by the Blue Ridge Trail Bus Line 
Company, operating a bus service between Charlotte and Asheville via Ruther- 
fordton and the Hickory Nut Gap route. Aside from the more technical points 
of objection, it is urged by this respondent that it has ample facilities to 
handle the bus traffic between these points ; or, that if its facilities are not 
adequate, it is able and willing to provide adequate facilities, and that the 
granting of the franchise to the Motor Transportation Company of the South 
would greatly impair, if not completely destroy, the value of the franchise of 
the Blue Ridge Trail Bus Line Company. 

We are not persuaded that the granting of the franchise would in any way 
injure the Blue Ridge Trail Bus Line Company. The inauguration of this 
comprehensive scheme of through Pullman service will, if it succeeds, be the 



106 N. C. Corporation Commission 

means of attracting a great many visitors to the Chimney Rock section who 
do not now go there, and undoubtedly many of such visitors would utilize 
the service of the Blue Ridge Trail Bus Line Company in local trips over its 
lines, and we are persuaded that the petition should be granted with such 
limitations as will reasonably protect the interests of the Blue Ridge Trail 
Bus Line Company. 

It is apparent that the petitioner desires a grant of franchise before July 
1st, and that the respondents wish to delay action beyond July 1st because 
It is thought that under the new law governing operation of bus lines, which 
becomes effective on July 1st, the discretion of the Commission, with respect 
to granting franchises to operate over lines served by an operator, will be 
restricted by the terms of the new law. We are of the opinion that the fran- 
chise now under consideration could be granted under either the existing 
law or under the law which becomes effective July 1st upon finding that the 
applicant is in position to render a service of convenience to the public that 
cannot be rendered by the operator now on the line, as is true in this case. 
If this is not correct, we take this first opportunity to recommend that the 
new law should be amended. This law was enacted in part, at least, because 
it was approved and sponsored by the Corporation Commission. It was and 
is our desire to strengthen the position of bus operators so as to permit them 
to render the best service, and by the use of the best facilities which the 
patrons over a given line will justify. To this end we have given every 
encouragement to the consolidation of lines competing over a given route 
into a single unit of service, and have not in any case permitted competitive 
operations over a given route except in cases of a through service over a 
route of a more local character, and then under protective limitations for 1 
the benefit of the existing operator. But our view is that in all these mat- 
ters the convenience of the public is the paramount consideration. The high- 
ways over which bus lines operate belong to the public and are built and 
maintained by the public for its own convenience and service. Operators of 
hus lines have no prescriptive property rights over the use of these highways, 
and they should have no property rights in the franchises granted by the 
public which in any way conflict with or become paramount to the public 
interest. There should reside in some public authority the broad discretion 
for an intelligent application of this principle; and if in our desire to 
strengthen the position of existing bus operators we are in part responsible 
for a limitation of this discretion in the new law, we desire to go on record 
as recommending that the next General Assembly broaden that discretion. 



Upon consideration of the whole matter, it is 

Ordered, That franchise certificate be granted to the Motor Transportation 
Company of the South to operate bus lines for one trip in each direction 
daily, between the passenger depot of the Seaboard Air Line Railway Com 
pany, near Rutherfordton, and Lake Lure, Chimney Rock and Bat Cave or 
schedule set out in its petition, which schedule will constitute a connecting 
service to and from the passenger trains of the Seaboard Air Line Railwas 
which handle the Pullman cars for through passengers. So much of tlw 



Claims and Complaints 107 

petition as seeks authority to handle passengers to, from, or between points 

intermediate between the passenger depot of the Seaboard Air Line Railway, 

near Rutherfordton, and Lake Lure, Chimney Rock and Bat Cave is denied. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 29th day of June, 1927. Clerk, 

IN RE PETITION OF THE MOTOR TRANSPORTATION COMPANY OF 
THE SOUTH FOR AUTHORITY TO OPERATE PASSENGER BUSSES 
BETWEEN RUTHERFORDTON AND WOODLAWN, NEWLAND, BLOW- 
ING ROCK AND BOONE. 

Order 

Petition of the Motor Transportation Company of the South has been filed 
with the Corporation Commission on this date, seeking authority to operate 
one round trip schedule per day of passenger busses between its passenger 
depot at Rutherfordton and Woodlawn, Newland, Blowing Rock and Boone. 

The Motor Transportation Company of the South is a subsidiary of the 
Seaboard Air Line Railway Company, and it is its purpose, through the 
Motor Transportation Company of the South, to furnish through passenger- 
facilities to and from above-named points, connecting with through Pullman 
service to be operated over its rail lines to Rutherfordton, North Carolina. 
The route over which it is proposed to operate these through bus lines would 
parallel local operations between Rutherfordton and Marion and between 
Marion and Woodlawn and in part a local operation between Johnson City, 
Tennessee, through Newland to Marion ; but it is not proposed by the peti- 
tioner to handle local passengers between any points now served by existing 
bus operators. The petition states : 

"Applicant does not seek to handle local passengers between points 
now covered by existing franchises, nor between points which parallel 
the Southern Railway. Applicant seeks primarily to operate in connec- 
tion with passengers arriving at Rutherfordton on trains of Seaboard 
Air Line Railway to convey such passengers to their final destination 
when on the route above referred to, and similar traffic moving in the 
opposite direction." 

It is also proposed to operate this through bus service seasonally each year 
between June 1st and October 1st in connection with train service on the 
Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to and from Rutherfordton, North 
Carolina. 

Notice has been given the operators of bus lines operating a local service 
over parts of the proposed route. For reasons discussed in the order of this 
date, in the matter of the petition of the Motor Transportation Company of 
the South for authority to operate busses between Rutherfordton, North Caro- 
lina, and Lake Lure, Chimney Rock and Bat Cave, it is desired that an order 
should be entered with respect to this petition today. It is 

Ordered, That the petition be granted, subject to revocation after proper 
notice and hearing of parties operating local services between points on the 
proposed route and also subject to the limitation that passengers are to be 
handled over this route by the Motor Transportation Company of the South 



108 N. C. Corporation Commission 

only between its passenger depot, near Rutherfordton, North Carolina, and 
Woodlawn, Newland, Blowing Rock and Boone, North Carolina. Copy of this 
petition and order will be mailed to the operators who operate busses and 
local transportation over parts of this route; and, if such parties, or any of 
them, wish to be heard, such hearing will be given at the office of the Com- 
mission in Raleigh on Friday, July 8, 1927, at ten o'clock A. M. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 30th day of June, 1927. Clerk. 

IN RE CANCELLATION OF THAT PART OF FRANCHISE CERTIFI- 
CATE NO. 147 RELATING TO BUS OPERATION BETWEEN SMITH- 
FELD AND DUNN, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

The Commission having under consideration the question of roads over 
which franchises have been granted under the bus law and the franchises 
have been forfeited because of failure to operate; and the Carolina Coach 
Company having been advised that failure to operate thereon would auto- 
matically cancel its authority under the 1927 Act, provided it did not put a 
passenger operation on between the towns of Smithfield and Dunn, North 
Carolina, and no reply having been received from said company except that 
orally transmitted by Mr. H. H. Patterson, vice-president of the Carolina 
Coach Company, that part of Franchise Certificate No. 147 which granted 
to the Carolina Coach Company a franchise over the route in question is 
hereby cancelled. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 1st day of September, 1927. Clerk. 

IN RE CERTAIN CITIZENS OF JACKSON COUNTY V. TUCKASEEGEE 
BUS LINE. 

Order 

Because of continued complaint on the part of several citizens of Jackson 
County against the operation of the Tuckaseegee Bus Line, and more par- 
ticularly against certain practices of the owners of said line, the complaint 
was set down for hearing on July 15, 1927, in the Court House in Sylva, North 
Carolina, and the hearing was held by the Director of Motor Vehicle Trans- 
portation, sitting as examiner for the Commission. The evidence taken at 
the hearing is evidenced by notes taken by the examiner and now on file with 
the records in this office. After the hearing, briefs were filed by the attorneys 
for the parties at interest and an examination of these briefs indicates that 
the references to the evidence therein are substantially correct. 

In addition to charges of misconduct on the part of operators and drivers, 
the principal complaint was against the operation of the bus line's busses 
between East LaPort and Rich Mountain by Caney Fork. Evidence was 
offered tending to show that the respondents' operation did not meet con- 
venience and necessity, and considerable evidence was offered to the effect 
that miscellaneous taxi service would best serve that community. 



Claims and Complaints 109 

The foregoing is the substance, in brief, of the evidence against the Tucka- 
seegee Bus Line. There was evidence of a great many people riding on these 
cars between the two points named above, which showed that the people who 
traveled in that vicinity were using the line considerably. It further appears 
that if the established line were cancelled, in order to give this service or a 
satisfactory service the jitneys or "for hire" cars would of necessity have to 
operate on somewhat the same or similar schedules, which, in turn, would 
make them liable under the bus act and would require a franchise certificate 
under that law or they would technically violate the letter of the law. 

As to the charges of personal conduct of persons owning the property right 
in the operation, no evidence was offered of such recent violations, except in 
the case of Earl Wood, who was arrested by a policeman and found to have a 
small quantity of whisky in a pint bottle in his pocket. There was no evi- 
dence of possession for sale, or otherwise, except for personal use. There was 
no evidence that he was under the influence of it and the case had not been 
tried in the Recorder's Court at the time this hearing was held. He was not 
on a bus at the time he was arrested and there was no evidence that he was 
even driving a bus that day, the day before, or the day after. The charges 
of personal conduct against other parties who had from time to time driven 
for the owners of this line, or were at that time driving for them, was of 
such nature that it could not be held against the Tuckaseegee Bus Line. 

On all other operations within the State where charges have been made 
against inadequate service, the matter has been remedied by requiring addi- 
tional or better service. Since the inception of the bus law many operators 
being inexperienced have had to be taught what kind of service the public 
needed and both the quantity and quality of service has, of necessity, had to 
be governed to some extent by the revenue from the operation. The infor- 
mation obtained at the hearing is of such nature that it puts the Commission 
on notice that there is room for improvement, and this will be required when 
it is practicable to do do ; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the case be dismissed. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 1st day of October, 1927. Cleric. 

IN RE PETITION OF SEASHORE TRANSPORTATION COMPANY AND 
CARTERET TRANSIT COMPANY TO OPERATE BUS SERVICE BE- 
TWEEN BEAUFORT AND MOREHEAD CITY OVER THE BRIDGE 
WHICH FORMS A PART OF HIGHWAY ROUTE NUMBER 101. 

Order 

Petition in this matter was originally made by the Seashore Transportation 
Company in 1925, when the question of building the bridge between the towns 
of Beaufort and Morehead City was first proposed. At that time the Seashore 
Transportation Company was advised that it could so operate and in order 
to protect this operating right it operated from near Havelock over Highway 
No. 10 to Beaufort for several months until that road became so bad that it 
could not be traveled with satisfaction and operation was discontinued. In 
the meantime, the bus act was amended to provide that where an operator 
failed to operate over a given line for a period of thirty days that he auto- 



110 N. C. Corporation Commission 

matically lost the right to operate. During the summer of 1927, when the 
bridge was nearing completion, the application of this company was renewed 
to extend its operation from Morehead City to Beaufort. About this same 
time the Carteret Transit Company, which operates a bus line between 
Atlantic and Beaufort, made application to extend its operation from Beau- 
fort to Morehead City. 

Hearing was set and held on November 17, 1927, and the hearing was 
attended by a great many interested citizens from Beaufort and also repre- 
sentatives of several organizations, such as the chamber of commerce, and 
also by members of the Highway Commission of Beaufort County. All wit- 
nesses and petitioners from Beaufort were very decided in their views regard- 
ing the necessity for the Seashore Transportation Company's extending its 
schedules now being operated between Goldsboro and Morehead City to Beau- 
fort. There was no evidence offered which would lead the Commission to 
believe that the operation of the Carteret Transit Company from Atlantic 
through Beaufort to Morehead City would operate disadvantageously to any 
interest. The distance between the towns in question, Morehead City and 
Beaufort, is something like two miles and the additional revenue to either 
carrier would not amount to a great deal from the standpoint of money, but 
the extension of both lines across the bridge will probably enhance the con- 
venience of the bus traffic to the traveling public very greatly, as people in 
Morehead City and Beaufort are largely transients desiring to go to Atlantic 
and points up the coast and passengers in Beaufort desire to come east to 
New Bern, Kinston and Goldsboro. Therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the Seashore Transportation Company is hereby granted 
authority to extend such schedules as it now operates between Goldsboro and 
Morehead City across the bridge to Beaufort and the Carteret Transit Com- 
pany is hereby authorized to extend such schedules as it now operates between 
Atlantic and Beaufort to Morehead City. No additional service shall be 
operated by either carrier between Beaufort and Morehead City, except that 
hereinbefore specified, until application has been made to and approvd by 
the Commission. This order shall be effective from date of issuance. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 6th day of December, 1927. Clerk. 

IN RE APPLICATION OF J. MARION WASHAM, MOORESVILLE, 
NORTH CAROLINA, FOR PERMISSION TO OPERATE A BUS LINE 
BETWEEN KANNAPOLIS AND CONCORD. 

Order 
The petitioner, Marion Washam, has for a number of years operated a bus 
line between Mooresville, North Carolina, and Kannapolis, North Carolina, 
over a county road. During the summer of 1925, when the several operations 
on Highway No. 15 between Concord and Kannapolis were being adjusted, 
the Commission in a temporary order provided that the White Bus Line 
could operate a thirty-minute schedule between Kannapolis and Concord. 
Not being satisfied with this order, the White Bus Line did not avail itself 
thereof and when the permanent order regulating traffic on that highway 
was made, the temporary schedule granted to the White Bus Line were per- 
manently discontinued. During the interim of the effectiveness of the tern- 



Claims and Complaints 111 

porary order, Mr. W.asham was told orally by the Director of Motor Vehicle 
Transportation that inasmuch as he had previously connected with the White 
Bus Line's thirty-minute schedules between Kannapolis and Concord that he 
could carry his passengers picked up between Mooresville and Kannapolis to 
Concord, but he was given no permission to transport passengers picked up 
in Kannapolis to Concord or from Concord to Kannapolis or at intermediate 
points. This arrangement was continued for awhile until the purchase of all 
the operations over Route 15 by the present operator, the Southern Coach 
Company, when objection was made to Mr. YVasham's operation between the 
two towns. Mr. Washam was asked to discontinue this temporary operation 
on several occasions but he continued it until after being brought into court 
with a number of jitney operators on the same line when he ceased operating 
pending the hearing referred to in this order. He then made application to 
operate over this line, filing application for franchise, and hearing was set 
and held on November 17. 1927, and a number of witnesses from Mooresville 
were presented in his behalf. 

There is only one question to be considered in connection with this appli- 
cation ; that is, whether or not the additional service between Kannapolis and 
Concord is necessary. Inasmuch as the present operator is operating an 
hourly schedule between the two towns regularly and a fifteen-minute sched- 
ule on Saturdays and other rush days, the Commission is unable to see where 
additional operation could possibly pay. Under the statute, if the Commis- 
sion were to determine that additional service is necessary, it would first have 
to give the present operator between the two towns an opportunity to put on 
the additional service found necessary ; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That the petition be dismissed. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 6th day of December, 1927. Clerk. 

IN RE PASSENGER LIABILITY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE INSUR- 
ANCE ENDORSEMENT. 

Order 

The Commission having under consideration Section 6, Chapter 136, Public 
Laws of 1927, known as the insurance section of the bus law. it is 

Ordered, That the following prescribed endorsement shall be made a part 
of all public liability and property damage insurance policies filed by motor 
vehicle operators holding franchise certificates under Chapter 136, Public 
Laws of 1927 : 

No condition, provision, stipulation, or limitation contained in the 
policy to which this endorsement is attached or any endorsement thereon, 
nor the violation of any of the same by the assured shall affect in any 
way the right of any person injured in his person or property by reason 
of an act of negligence arising from the operation by the assured of any 
motor vehicle insured hereunder, nor relieve the company from liability 
for the payment to such person of any judgment to the extent and in the 
amount set forth in the policy; but the assured hereby agrees to reim- 
burse the company for any and all sums of money including loss, costs, 
expenses, and disbursements of every kind which it may pay as a result, 
direct or indirect, of the violation or breach of any of the conditions, 
provisions, stipulations, or limitations in the policy. * 



112 N. C. Corporation Commission 

The liability of the company for damage to propert is hereby extended 
to include damage to baggage in the custody of the assured and loss of 
baggage when checked by the assured ; Provided, however, that the com- 
pany's liability under this paragraph is limited to fifty ($50.00) dollars 
for each piece of baggage. 

The insurance granted under this policy is hereby extended to cover 
any motor vehicle operated by the assured for the transportation of 
passengers for compensation upon the route, or routes, designated in the 
franchise certificate issued by the Corporation Commission of North 
Carolina, whether such motor vehicle be specifically named, numbered, 
or designated, in the policy or not and/or any motor vehicle specifically 
named, numbered, or otherwise designated or described sufficiently for 
identification, operated by the assured while actually engaged in the 
transportation of passengers for compensation upon any of the public 
highways of the State of North Carolina. 

The insolvency, or bankruptcy, of the assured shall not release the com- 
pany from the payment of such damages hereunder as would have been 
payable but for such insolvency, or bankruptcy ; and the prepayment of 
any judgment that may be recovered against the assured upon any claim 
covered by this policy is not a condition precedent to any right of action 
against the company upon this policy, but the company is bound to the 
extent of its liability under the policy to pay and satisfy such judgment 
and an action may be maintained upon such judgment by the injured per- 
son, or his or her heirs or personal representatives, as the case may be, 
to enforce liability of the company as in this policy set forth and limited. 

The policy to which this endorsement is attached shall not be cancelled 
until after ten days' notice in writing, by the company, shall have first 
been given to the Corporation Commission of North Carolina at its office 
in Raleigh, North Carolina, the said ten days' notice to commence to run 
from the date of receipt of notice by the Commission. 

The foregoing endorsement shall be filed with, attached to, and made a 
part of all new insurance policies filed under the said chapter on and after 
January 1, 1928. It is further 

Ordered, That all insurance policies now on file with the North Carolina 
Corporation Commission in pursuance to Chapter 50, Public Laws of 1925, 
and Chapter 136, Public Laws of 1927, shall automatically expire on January 
31, 1928, unless the foregoing endorsement, bearing date of February 1, 1928, 
is attached thereto and made a part thereof. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 6th day of December, 1927. Clerk, 

IN RE RULES AND REGULATIONS ISSUED UNDER CHAPTER 136, 
PUBLIC LAWS OF 1927. 

Order 

Under and by virtue of the provisions of Chapter 136, Public Laws of 1927, 
entitled : "An Act to Repeal, Amend, and Re-enact Chapter 50, Public Laws 
of 1925, Known as 'The Bus Law,' " and in the exercise of the powers con- 
ferred upon the Corporation Commission therein, it is 

Ordered, That the following rules and regulations governing the supervision, 
control, and operation of motor vehicle carriers transporting passengers, or 
property, or both, for compensation over the public highways of the State, as 
defined in the said Chapter 136, Public Laws of 1927, be, and the same are 
hereby, adopted and promulgated, effective from and after 12:01 o'clock 
A. M.. January 1, 1928. 



Claims and Complaints 113 

Rule 1. Definitions. In all matters relating to the administration of these 
rules, whenever and wherever the terms defined in Section 1 of Chapter 136, 
Public Laws of 1927, are used in these rules and regulations, they shall be 
construed and defined in accordance with the definitions in the said section 
of said chapter, unless the definitions given therein are inconsistent with the 
text hereof. 

Rule 2. Necessity for Franchise Certificate. Except as otherwise pro- 
vided in Section 2 of the Act. no motor vehicle shall be operated for the trans- 
portation of persons or property for compensation over the public highways 
of this State between cities, or between towns, or between cities and towns, 
until the owner shall have first applied for and received a franchise certificate 
from the Commission authorizing such operation. 

Rule 3. To Wham Applicable. Except as otherwise provided in Section 2, 
Chapter 136, Public Laws of 1927, all carriers operating motor vehicles, or 
motor vehicles with trailers, for the transportation of persons or property 
for compensation over the public highways in this State between cities, or 
between towns, or between cities and towns, are hereby declared to be subject 
to the aforesaid Chapter 136. Public Laws of 1927. Where the corporate 
limits of two or more cities join, they shall be considered as one for purposes 
of administering the Act. 

Rule 4. Classification of Motor Vehicle Carriers. Motor vehicle carriers 
operating under the Act shall be classified as PASSENGER CARRIERS and 
PROPERTY CARRIERS. 

Rule 5. Application for Franchise Certificate. Every corporation or per- 
son, their lessees, trustees, or receivers, before operating any motor vehicle 
upon the public highways' of the State for the transportation of persons or 
property for compensation, within the purview of the Act, shall apply for a 
franchise certificate so to do, in the following manner : 

(a) Application shall be made to the Commission on forms furnished 
by the Commission. 

(b) All information requested on said application forms shall be given 
in full and all questions thereon shall be answered truthfully. 

(c) There shall be attached to each application one each of the appli- 
cant's proposed fares, time schedules, and equipment specifications on 
blanks furnished by the Commission for that purpose. 

Passenger tariffs must contain: 

(1) Rules and regulations, if any, which govern the tariff in clear 
and explicit terms. 

(2) All tariffs must contain a rule with reference to rates applicable 
to intermediate points not specifically named in such tariff. This rule 
must read substantially, as follows : "Rates from or to intermediate 
points not named herein shall be the proper proportion of the rates from 
or to the next more distant point named." (See Rule 19.) 

(3) Full explanation of reference marks and technical abbreviations 
used in the tariff. 

(4) Adult fares, definitely and specifically stated, in cents, or in 
dollars and cents, per passenger ; children's fares, baggage rules, together 
with the names of the stations or stopping places from and to which the 
fares apply, arranged in a simple and systematic manner. 

(5) Commutation rates by tickets or otherwise. 

Freight tariffs must contain: 

(1) Rules and regulations which govern the tariff, in clear and 
explicit terms, setting forth all privileges and services covered by the 
rates, such as : free storage and store-door receipt and delivery. 



114 N. C. Corporation Commission 

(2) Alphabetically arranged and complete index to all commodities 
upon which special commodity rates are named. If all of the rates to 
each destination in the tadiff are arranged alphabetically by commodi- 
ties, or if not more than twenty-five commodities are carried in the tariff, 
no index need be shown. 

(3) Where tariffs name class rates, a classification must be adopted 
and published. Such classification shall contain all articles or com- 
modities arranged alphabetically, showing opposite each the class to 
which such article or commodity belongs. If such classification be carried 
in a separate publication from the tariffs, references must be made to this 
classification on the title page of the tariff immediately above the date 
issued and the effective date. 

(4) Alphabetically arranged and complete index to points from and 
to which the tariff applies. If not more than twenty-five points are 
carried in the tariff, no index need be shown. 

(5) Full explanation of reference marks and technical abbreviations 
used in the tariff. 

(6) All rates must be stated explicitly in cents, or dollars and cents, 
per one hundred pounds, or per ton of two thousand pounds, or per 
standard package or unit, together with the names of the places from 
and to which they apply, arranged in a simple and systematic manner. 

(7) If desired, carriers may use a mileage table or distance table for 
basis of rates where specific rates are not shown, this generally to cover 
movement by carriers operating special trips and full truck loads without 
stop between origin and destination. 

Time schedules shall show: 

(1) The time of arrival at and departure from all termini. 

(2) The time of departure from intermediate points between termini. 

(3) The distance in miles between all points shown in the schedule. 

(4) Time schedule shall show what points, if any, on route of 
carrier to which service cannot be rendered and reasons therefor. (This 
applies particularly to special, through busses.) 

Equipment descriptions must contain: 

(1) Make of vehicle. 

(2) Model and year. 
(30 Factory number. 

(4) Motor number. 

(5) Weight empty. 

(6) Width. 

(7) Carrying capacity; seats, if passenger carrying vehicles; tonnage, 
if freight carrier (truck). 

(8) Kind of tires, solid or pneumatic. 

(d) Any other exhibit or special information which the commission 
may request. 

Rule 6. Hearings. Upon receipt of an application for a franchise cer- 
tificate to operate a passenger service, if the proposed route be over a high- 
way already being served by one or more passenger carriers, time and place 
shall be set for hearing. If the application be for an express or freight 
service, the Commission may, in its discretion, fix a time and place for hearing. 

Rule 7. Publication of Notice of Application. When the time and place 
for hearing on an application shall have been fixed, the applicant shall, at 
least ten days prior to the hearing, cause to be published in a newspaper of 
general circulation in the territory proposed to be served a notice reciting 
the fact of the filing of application together with a statement of the time and 
place for hearing, and shall file affidavit of publication with the commission 
on or before the date of hearing. 






Claims and Complaints 115 

Rule 8. Application Null and Void after Sixty Days. When action upon 
an application has been deferred upon request of applicant for sixty days after 
date of filing, the application shall become null and void and no action will 
be taken thereon. 

Rule 9. Organization. Franchise certificates shall not be issued to two 
or more persons not incorporated until such persons have consummated a 
partnership agreement, to run for a period of three years, and until they have 
registered same in each county in which they propose to operate. This must 
be evidenced by filing with the Commission a copy of the agreement bearing 
certificate of registration. Where the Commission is of the opinion that any 
given operation can be conducted more advantageously by incorporation, such 
action will be required. This rule shall apply to renewals of franchise cer- 
tificates as well as to new applications. 

Rule 10. Granting of Applicants. Applications may be granted tentatively 
pending purchase of equipment and filing of equipment specifications and 
insurance, but franchise certificates shall not be issued until such equipment 
specifications and acceptable insurance have been filed. 

Rule 11. Sale. Purchase or Other Disposition of Franchise Certificate. 
Franchise certificates may not be assigned, or transferred, or pledged, or 
hypothecated in any way nor the operation under any such certificate leased 
without the written consent of the Commission. Before such transfers or 
leases will be granted, all franchise tax due to be paid on the gross revenue 
receipts of such operation and all bus station rents shall have been paid in 
full by the assignor, or lessor, and the assignee, or lessee, shall comply fully 
with the law and regulations required of applicants in Rule 5. 

Rule 12. Insurance. Each motor vehicle carrier, included in the classifi- 
cations in Rule 4, shall file with the Commission, subject to the provisions 
and conditions of the Act, an acceptable liability and property damage insur- 
ance policy, in a company authorized to do business in this State, covering 
each motor vehicle used, or to be used, by the carrier in the following 
amounts : 

PASSENGER CARRYING VEHICLES 

Twelve Passenger Capacity and Under. — Five thousand ($5,000) dollars 
for injury or death to one person, and subject to a limit of ten thousand 
($10,000) dollars for injury to, or death of. more than one person in 
any one accident, and one thousand ($1,000) dollars for damage to prop- 
erty of persons other than the assured. 

Thirteen to Twenty-one Passenger Capacity. — Five thousand ($5,000) 
dollars for injury or death to one person, and subject to a limit of fifteen 
thousand ($15,000) dollars for injury to, or death of, more than one 
person in any one accident, and one thousand ($1,000) dollars for damage 
to property of persons other than the assured. 

Over Twenty-one Passenger Capacity. — Five thousand ($5,000) dollars 
for injury or death to one person, and subject to a limit of twenty thou- 
sand ($20,000) dollars for injury to, or death of, more than one person 
in any one accident, and one thousand ($1,000) dollars for damage to 
property of persons other than the assured. 

All Passenger Vehicles.— Fifty ($50.00) dollars for the damage to or 
the loss of any one piece of baggage in the custody of the assured when 
checked by the assured. 



116 N. C. Corporation Commission 

PROPERTY CARRYING VEHICLES 

Any Vehicle. — Two thousand five hundred ($2,500) dollars for injury 
or death to one person, and subject to a limit of five thousand ($5,000) 
dollars for injury to, or death of, more than one person in any one acci- 
dent, and one thousand ($1,000) dollars for damage to property of per- 
sons other than the assured. 

Cargo Insurance. — (Not compulsory, except when specifically required.) 
Five hundred ($500) dollars for damage to or the loss of any one cargo 
shipment, or part thereof, accepted and receipted for by the assured and 
in the custody of the assured. 
Rule 13. Bonds in Lieu of Insurance. If in lieu of the above liability and 
property damage and cargo insurance the applicant or carrier elect, he may 
deposit with the Commission, subject to the provisions and conditions of the 
Act, acceptable bond, or bonds, of the United States Government, the State of 
North Carolina issued since 1900, or file an acceptable bond in a surety com- 
pany qualified under the laws of this State and the rules herein to do busi- 
ness in this State, for each motor vehicle used, or to be used, by such carrier 
in the following amounts : 



PASSENGER CARRYING VEHICLES 

Seven Passenger Vehicles and Under. — Ten thousand ($10,000) dollars 
each ; 

Eight to Twelve Passenger Vehicles (Inclusive) . — Fifteen thousand 
($15,000) dollars each; 

Thirteen to Twenty-one Passenger Vehicles (Inclusive). — Twenty thou- 
sand ($20,000) dollars each; 

Over Twenty-one Passengers. — Twenty -five thousand ($25,000) dollars 
each. 

PROPERTY CARRYING VEHICLES 

Ten thousand ($10,000) dollars each; one thousand ($1,000) dollars 
cargo. 

Rule 14. Cancellation of Insurance Policies and Surety Bonds. All insur- 
ance policies or surety bonds filed with the Commission under Section 6 of 
the Act shall be so written that they shall continue in full force and effect 
and shall not be cancelled until after ten days' written notice served on the 
Commission the said ten days' notice to commence to run from the date 
notice is actually received by the Commission. 

Rule 15. Insurance Policies to Become Public Documents. Insurance poli- 
cies when filed with and accepted by the Commission shall become public 
documents and, after cancellation, shall be retained in the files of the Com- 
mission for a period of not less than two years or such longer time as the 
Commission may deem necessary for the protection of the insured. Within 
ten days after receipt of notice required under Rule 14, the Commission shall 
mark such policies cancelled and shall issue a certificate to the insurer evi- 
dencing such cancellation. A copy of this certificate shall be attached to the 
cancelled policy as further evidence of such cancellation and of notice to the 
insurer. Acceptance of all insurance policies under the Act shall be subject 
to the conditions in this rule. 






Claims and Complaints 117 

(NOTE: Forms for passenger insurance endorsement required and forms 
for indemnity bond are printed in the back of this pamphlet.) 

Rule 16. Fares, Charges, and Free Transportation. Motor vehicle carriers 
shall not charge, demand, collect, or receive a greater, or less, or different, 
compensation for the transportation of persons or property, or for any service 
in connection therewith, than the rates, fares, and charges applicable to such 
carrier as specified in its tariffs filed with and approved by the Commission 
and in effect at the time ; nor shall any carrier refund or remit in any man- 
ner or by an device any portion of the rates, fares, or charges so specified, 
or extend to any person, firm, co-partnership, or corporation, or other organi- 
zation, or association, privileges or facilities in the transportation of persons 
or property except such as are regularly and uniformly extended to all. 

For the transportation of children under twelve years of age and over five 
years of age the fare shall not exceed one-half the adult fare ; for children 
under five years of age accompanied by a passenger paying full fare, no 
charge shall be made. 

Rule 17. Free Transportation, Passes, Etc. Motor vehicle carriers shall 
not, directly or indirectly, issue, give, tender, or honor, free fares except to 
its bona fide officers, agents, employees and members of their immediate 
families, the Commission, and such persons as the Commission may designate 
for the inspection of equipment and supervision of traffic upon the highways 
of the State ; Provided, that motor carriers under the Act may exchange free 
transportation within the limits of this rule. Circulars may be issued from 
time to time with further reference to this subject. 

Rule 18. Commission or Other Compensation on Ticket Sales. Motor 
vehicle carriers shall only pay commissions or other compensation for the 
sale of tickets or fares to corporations or persons, their lessees, trustees, or 
receivers, when contracts or agreements between the parties, in writing, have 
previously been filed with and approved by this Commission. 

Rule 19. Long and Short Haul, Fares and Rates. With the exception of 
the minimum twenty-five cent charge, motor vehicle carriers and drivers shall 
not charge or receive any proportionately greater compensation for transpor- 
tation of persons, or of like kind of property, for a shorter than for a longer 
distance over the same line in the same direction, the shorter being included 
within the longer distance on the same schedule, or charge any greater com- 
pensation as a through rate than the aggregate of the intermediate rates. 
Upon application of a carrier, the Commission may give authority to charge 
less for a longer than for a shorter distance for the transportation of persons 
or property in special cases after investigation by the Commission, but such 
permission shall specifically prescribe the extent to which such carrier mak- 
ing such application shall be relieved from the operation of this rule. Such 
rates carried in the tariff of a carrier shall have attached thereto a copy of 
the Commission's authority and bear specific reference thereto. (Under this 
rule it will be necessary for each carrier to determine his average mileage 
rate between his extreme termini over each route and then apply the same 
mileage proportion between the intermediate points ; provided, that where the 
amount of the fare at the determined mileage rate between any two points 
totals any figure between two multiples of five, the rate shall be the multiple 



118 N. C. Corporation Commission 

of five which is nearest the fare at the mileage rate determined. Illustration : 
Suppose a given route is twenty miles hetween extreme termini and the mile- 
age rate is four cents, then between two intermediate points on the same line 
sixteen miles apart the application of the four cent mileage rate would make 
the fare sixty-four cents : but under the above rule, the proper charge should 
be sixty-five cents. This same illustration applies to property as well as to 
passenger service.) 

Rule 20. Interruption of Service. All interruptions of service, where 
likely to continue for more than twenty-four hours, shall be reported promptly 
to the Commission and to the public along the route, with full statement of 
the cause and its possible duration. 

Rale 21. Discontinuance of Service. Carriers shall not discontinue serv- 
ice called for under the franchise certificate and time schedule filed thereunder 
without first having given the Commission and the public fifteen days' notice, 
in writing, of its intention and having secured the permission of the Com- 
mission. 

Rule 22. Carriers To Provide Tickets. All passenger carriers shall provide 
tickets at all agency stations and at such other places indicated on the pub- 
lished time schedules where satisfactory financial arrangement for handling 
can be made. 

Redemption of Tickets. All tickets when sold shall have the date of sale 
stamped thereon. Tickets when sold shall be redeemable for transportation 
when presented to driver on a bus or shall be redeemable at their sale price 
in money by the company or its agent within twelve months after the sale 
date stamped thereon ; if no date is stamped thereon at time of sale, such 
tickets shall be redeemable upon presentation at any time. 

Rule 23. Passengers with Tickets Riding Competing Lines. Wherever two 
or more carriers operate from a common station or point where tickets are 
on sale to a common destination, either over the same or different routes, and 
a passenger purchases a ticket over one line but by mistake or misinforma- 
tion takes a bus of the other or competing line, the carrier, operator, or driver 
of the bus on which such passenger is riding shall accept for transportation 
the ticket presented by the passenger, and the carrier named on the ticket 
shall reimburse the transporting carrier, not in excess of the amount paid by 
the passenger, upon the presentation of such ticket. At agency stations where 
redemption of tickets is made by the agent, this adjustment should be made 
by the agent. 

Rule 2Jj. Union Stations. Union motor vehicle passenger stations shall be 
established and maintained in accordance with the provisions of the Com- 
missioner's order of June 12, 1925, and amendments thereto, printed in the 
back of these rules and regulations. 

Rule 25. Inspection. Representatives of the Commission and of the High- 
way Commission authorized to make inspections under the provisions of the 
Act and these rules shall be provided with a card of identification. They shall 
have the right at any time to enter into or upon any motor vehicle being 
operated under the Act, and to which these rules apply, for the purposes of 
ascertaining whether or not the provisions of the law and these rules are 
being complied with. Wilful refusal of any carrier or driver of any such 



Claims and Complaints 119 

motor vehicle to stop or discontinue the use of any such motor vehicle until 
properly conditioned, when ordered to do so by any such representative, or 
to permit such representative to enter into or upon the same for the purposes 
aforesaid, or to display the permit issued for such motor vehicle upon his 
demand shall be sufficient ground for the revocation of the violator's franchise 
certificate or driver's permit, as the case may he. Inspectors shall report all 
irregularities under this rule to the Commission. The Commission's juris- 
diction under this rule is extended to include bus stations, carriers' offices 
and garages. 

Rule 26. Carriers' Office Records. There shall be kept on file in each 
carrier's principal office, subject to inspection by the Commission and the 
Commissioner of Revenue, or their duly authorized representatives, according 
to their separate jurisdictions : 

(a) An accurate, current record of the descriptive date of such motor 
vehicle used in the service such as is required to be filed with the Com- 
mission on Exhibit C. 

(b) A copy of the current schedule filed with and approved by the 
Commission. 

(c) A record showing the number of passengers carried daily and the 
amount of revenue received daily. 

(d) A record of accidents showing the name of the driver involved, 
(c) A record of itemized receipts and disbursements. 

Rule 27. Reports. Each motor vehicle carrier shall make the following 
reports to the Corporation Commission : 

Monthly Reports. Within ten days after the expiration of each month, 
a report of the number of passengers carried and the revenue received. 

Annual Reports. On or before March 15, 1928, and on or before March 
15th of each succeeding year, an annual report showing assets and lia- 
bilities, revenue and expenses of operation, and such other information 
as the Commission may require. 

Reports of Accidents. Accidents involving injury to persons or property 
shall be reported to the Commission within three days after occurrence. 

Reports of Drivers Dismissed from Service. When a driver employed 
by any carrier is dismissed from service for cause, the matter shall be 
reported immediately to the Commission, giving the cause leading to such 
action. 

Such other reports as may be required. 

Each motor vehicle carrier shall make the following reports to the 
Commissioner of Revenue : 

Monthly Tax Reports. Within thirty days after the expiration of each 
calendar month, a report of the revenue received during the previous 
calendar month with the six per cent, franchise tax inclosed therewith. 

TIME SCHEDULES 

Rule 28. (a) Time Schedules Numbered Consecutively. Time schedules 
must be numbered consecutively in the upper right-hand corner, beginning 
with number one, and must show the number of the time schedule cancelled. 

(b) Changes in Time Schedules. Changes in time schedules affecting 
the time of arrival or departure of any vehicle at or from any station or 
stopping place on the line or route, or which will effect a reduction or an 
increase in the number of vehicles being operated over any line or route, 
or which will effect a reduction or an increase in the amount of passenger 
vehicle service rendered at any terminal, station, or intermediate stop, 



120 N. C. Corporation Commission 

must be made as follows: A new schedule must be issued, bearing the* 
next consecutive number, and shall show reference to number of time 
schedule cancelled thereby. Thus, if Time Schedule No. 1 is desired to 
be cancelled, Time Schedule No. 2 shall be issued, showing that it is can- 
celling Time Schedule No. 1. 

(c) Filing and Posting Notice of Change in Schedule. A copy of pro- 
posed time schedule shall be filed with the Commission on or before the- 
date of posting and notice shall be given to the public by posting a copy 
in a conspicuous place at each station or stopping place affected between 
the first and tenth, inclusive, of any given month and shall remain posted 
for a period of fifteen days, to be effective not earlier than the first day 
of the following month, if approved. 

(d) Commission Action, Emergency, Etc. After the fifteen-day posting- 
period, the Commission may, on its own motion, or on the filing of suffi- 
cient protest by any person or persons affected, order same withdrawn, 
modified, or suspended ; but unless such action be taken by the Commis- 
sion, the schedule shall be considered in full force and effect on the first 
day of the month immediately following the posting period. In case of 
actual emergency, the Commission may, by order, in its discretion, permit 
such time schedules to become effective with less than fifteen days' posting 
and on dates other than the first day of the month. 

Rule 29. Schedules Posted for Information of Public. One copy of cur- 
rent time schedule shall be posted in a conspicuous place, easily accessible for 
public inspection, at each station or regular stopping place on the line or 
route, and a copy shall be in the possession of each driver. 

Rule 30. Adherence to Time Schedules. Time schedules as filed with and 
approved by the Commission and posted for the information of the public- 
shall be adhered to strictly. 

Rule 31. Freight Carirers — Non-Compliance. In individual cases, where 
proper showing is first made, motor carriers holding franchise certificates 
authorizing freight service where no passenger service whatever is rendered 
in connection therewith will be relieved of the necessity of complying with 
the provisions of the rules affecting time schedules so far as actual time of 
arrival at and departure from all termini and time of arrival and departure 
at and from intermediate points are concerned. 

EQUIPMENT 

Rule 32. Requirements for Placing Motor Vehicles in Service. Carriers 
desiring to place additional vehicles, either new or second-hand, in service or 
to replace old with new or second-hand vehicles shall : 

(1) Comply with provisions of Rule 52. 

(2) When purchase and delivery has been made, file description on 
Ehibit C with fee for number plate, or tag, and insurance coverage for 
each car. 

Rule 33. Motor Vehicles Removed from Service. When motor vehicles are 
removed from service, the number plates shall be returned immediately upon 
the discontinuance to the Commission. The law expressly prohibits the 
transfer of tags from one vehicle to another. 

Rule 34. Under Twelve Passenger Capacity Barred. Motor vehicles with 
seating capacity of less than twelve shall not be approved for service under 
the Act, except where, in the discretion of the Commission, road conditions, 
will not permit the operation with safety of cars of such capacity. 



Claims and Complaints 121 

Rule 35. Safe and Sanitary Condition. All motor vehicles shall be main- 
tained in a safe and sanitary condition. 

Rule 35. Weights and Widths. Motor vehicles of a greater width than 
eighty-six inches and greater loaded weight than fifteen thousand pounds for 
passenger traffic and greater width than eighty-six inches and greater loaded 
weight than nine tons for freight traffic shall not be approved for operation 
under the Act. Misrepresentation of such specifications will invoke the penal- 
ties provided in Paragraph 9, Sub-section (b), Section 10, of the Act. 

Rule 37. Lighting— Head Lamps, Etc. Each motor vehicle shall be equip- 
ped with two head lamps, no more and no less, at the front, which shall be 
so adjusted as to prohibit the beams from rising more than forty-two inches 
above the level of the roadway seventy-five feet ahead of the vehicle. Motor 
vehicles shall also be equipped with a left side white light on the running 
board. 

In all motor vehicles used in the transportation of passengers a light, or 
lights, shall be maintained and so arranged as to light up the whole of the 
interior thereof, except that portion occupied by the driver. The driver's seat, 
or booth, shall be shaded by curtain or otherwise, so as to give free and easy 
vision to the front. 

Each motor vehicle shall be provided with rear lights so arranged as to 
indicate and show when the brakes are applied. Such rear lights should be 
connected in series on the same circuit as the light that shows on the clash 
so that the driver at all times can see whether the rear signal is working 
properly. 

Motor vehicle carriers and drivers shall not leave any terminus on any 
trip which will require operation after sunset unless the lighting system of 
such vehicle is in proper condition and the headlights adjusted in accordance 
with the provisions of the State law. Should the lighting system become 
defective or out of order enroute, the vehicle shall be brought to a stop at a 
point out of the line of travel of the roadway and shall not proceed until the 
defect has been remedied. 

Spot Light. Motor vehicles may be equipped with spot lamps ; but upon 
approaching other vehicles, they shall be so aimed that no part of the beam 
will be directed to the left of the center of the highway nor more than one 
liundred feet in front of the vehicle. 

Rule 38. Tires. All motor vehicles used in the transportation of pas- 
sengers shall be equipped with pneumatic tires and shall, when leaving a 
terminus, be equipped with at least one extra tire. 

Rule 39. Heating System. All passenger carrying vehicles shall be equip- 
ped with a suitable heating system sufficient to keep the same reasonably 
comfortable for its passengers and shall be kept in such repair that fumes 
therefrom shall not escape into the passenger compartment. 

Rule IfQ. Reserve Equipment. Sufficient reserve equipment shall be main- 
tained by all carriers to insure the reasonable maintenance of established 
routes and fixed time schedules. 

Rule Jfl. Brakes. Horns, Etc. All vehicles shall be provided with good 
and sufficient brakes and with suitable horns, which shall be blown as a 



122 N. C. Corporation Commission 

signal of warning upon approaching all road and street intersections and 
whenever there is danger of collision or other accident. 

Rule 42. Emergency Exit Doors. Every passenger vehicle having a com- 
mon entrance and exit in front with a longitudinal aisle shall be provided 
with a left exit door at the front and one on each side of the opposite end 
of the bus body from the regularly used entrance and exit. Such exit doors 
shall be kept in good operating order and shall open outward toward the 
natural means of egress and shall always be unlockable from within. Vehicles 
with cross seats and compartment doors shall have one left exit door in the 
front and one left exit door in the rear. 

Rule 43. Front Seat an Emergency Seat. The front seat of all passenger 
motor vehicles shall be considered an emergency seat and passengers shall not 
be allowed to occupy it until all the other seats of such motor vehicle are 
fully occupied, and then not more than two passengers may occupy such front 
seat at the same time with the driver. Exceptions will be made in case of 
sick or afflicted persons who because of such sickness or affliction cannot sit 
with comfort in rear seats. 

Rule 44. Trailers on Passenger Vehicles Prohibited. Motor vehicles used 
for the transportation of passengers shall not be driven or operated with any 
trailer or other vehicle attached thereto, except where a vehicle becomes dis- 
abled while on a trip and is unable to run from its own power, such disabled 
vehicle may be towed to the nearest point where repair facilities are available.. 

Rule 45. Trailers on Property Carrying Vehicles. Property carriers shall 
confine themselves to the use of one trailer on each motor truck unless under 
Chapter 220, Public Laws of 1927, they would be entitled to make application 
and obtain approval for the use of more, which, when coupled together, shall 
not exceed eighty-five feet in their combined length. 

Rule 46. Trailers Listed and Approved. Motor vehicles used for the trans- 
portation of property shall not be used for towing or propelling any trailer 
or another vehicle used as a trailer, unless such trailer is listed with and 
approved by the Commission. 

Rule //?. Trailer Couplings. Each trailer, or other vehicle used as a 
trailer, shall be attached to the vehicle by which it is drawn by stay chains 
in addition to a coupler. 

Rule 48- Seats far Passengers. Comfortable seats must be provided on all 
passenger motor vehicles. 

Rule 49. Fire Extinguishers. It is recommended that each motor vehicle 
used for the transportation of passengers be equipped with a fire extinguisher, 
bearing the label of approval of the Fire Underwriters Association, which 
should be kept in good operating condition at all times. 

Rule 50. Mirrors and Reflectors. Each motor vehicles shall be equipped 
with a mirror or reflector 'attached to and so located and adjusted on such 
vehicle as to give the driver thereon a clear view of the highway directly to 
the rear on a line parallel to the side of the body of such motor vehicle. 

Rule ol. Gasoline Tanks. The gasoline tank of each passenger motor 
vehicle shall be located entirely outside the body with the inlet so arranged 
as to permit filling from the outside exclusively. 



Claims and Complaints 123 

Rule 52. Plans for New and Remodeled Vehicles to be Approved. Plans 
and specifications for new passenger motor vehicles to be purchased and for 
the remodeling of passenger motor vehicles now being operated under the Act 
shall be submitted to the Commission for approval before contract for pur- 
chase or remodeling is made or let. 

BAGGAGE 

Rule 53. Transportation of Explosives. Motor vehicle operators, or driv- 
ers, or other agents, shall not permit any inflammable, explosive, or poisonous 
or injurious gases or liquids, or loaded firearms to be loaded in or upon any 
passenger motor vehicle, nor shall they be permitted to be stored as baggage 
in or upon the premises of any passenger bus station. 

Rule 5J t . Sample Baggage. Sample baggage shall consist of baggage for 
commercial as distinguished from personal use of the passenger, and shall be 
restricted to catalogues, models and samples of goods, wares or merchandise 
in trunks or other suitable containers and for use by the passenger present- 
ing same for checking in making sales or other disposition of the goods repre- 
sented thereby, subject to Rules 53, G2, 63 and 64. 

Rule 55. Personal Baggage. Personal baggage shall consist of wearing 
apparel, toilet articles (except liquid), and similar personal effects in actual 
use and necessary and appropriate for the wear, use. comfort and conveni- 
ence of the passenger for the purpose of the journey and not intended for 
other persons or for sale, subject to Rules 53. 62. 63 and 64. 

Rule 56. Baggage and Express Loading. The amount of baggage that 
may be carried in any motor vehicle with passengers shall not be greater 
than can be carried safely and conveniently without causing discomfort to 
passengers, nor shall it in any way be permitted to jeopardize the safety of 
operation. Doorways and aisles shall be kept clear of all obstruction. No 
baggage, trunk, crate, or other article, shall be carried on the running board 
of the left side. When the narrowest dimension of baggage loaded on top of 
passenger vehicles is twice the height of the guard rail, it shall be tied 
securely. Baggage too heavy for one man to load or unload may be refused 
when tendered at non-agency stations and stops or when tendered at agency 
stations destined for non-agency points, provided the motor vehicle carrier 
has previously posted a notice to that effect at stations and stops along the 
route. 

Rule 57. Baggage Priority. When more baggage is presented to be trans- 
ported on any given schedule than can be carried conveniently on the vehicle, 
hand, personal, and sample baggage shall have priority over trunks and 
parcels, and the same shall have preference in the order named. 

Rule 58. Baggage Cheeks to be Provided. Each passenger motor vehicle 
carrier shall provide duplicate checks for baggage to and from all points on 
all routes covered by his franchise certificate. 

Rule 59. Authority for Checking Baggage. Baggage checks shall be issued 
for baggage, other articles, or property upon presentation of valid transpor- 
tation only when the owner of the baggage, other articles, or property, is also 
owner of the transportation and is a bona fide passenger over the same line 
to or beyond the destination of the baggage. 



124 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Rule 60. Baggage Storage. At all agency bus stations when arriving 
baggage is not immediately claimed by the passenger owner, the operator or 
driver shall deliver same to the Station Agent; and, if delivered to owner 
on same day of arrival, no storage charge shall be made ; if not delivered to 
owner until the following day, or later, a storage charge may be made. A 
day shall be reckoned from midnight to midnight. 

Rule 61. Delivery of Baggage. Motor vehicle operators, drivers, and sta- 
tion agents, shall not deliver baggage when checked except upon presentation 
of the duplicate check, or until satisfactory identification has been estab- 
lished and a written record made of such identification, signed by the person 
receiving such baggage and the person releasing same. In the absence of 
satisfactory identification, the agent, operator, or driver, the claimant, and a 
third party may make a written appraisal of the baggage, other article, or 
property, and thereupon the claimant may make a satisfctory good-faith 
deposit, or bond, in the amount of the appraised value therefor, which shall 
be held in trust for a period of thirty days. After the expiration of thirty 
days, if no other claimant applies for such baggage, etc., the deposit shall 
be returned or the bond cancelled, as the case may be. 

Rule 62. Baggage Containers. All baggage shall be inclosed in receptacles, 
such as trunks, valises, telescopes, suit cases, leather hat boxes or satchels 
provided with handles, locked or otherwise securely fastened and made of 
material of sufficient strength and durability and of a quality to withstand 
rapid handling and piling incident to its transportation. 

Rule 63. Articles Other Than Baggage. All articles not coming within 
the classifications of personal or sample baggage shall be charged for either 
by the piece or gross weight at the excess baggage rates. 

Rule 64. When Operator or Driver May Refuse Baggage. Baggage con- 
taining money, jewelry, negotiable paper, liquids, glassware, perishable or 
fragile articles shall not be checked or received for transportation without a 
declared valuation ; and, if baggage be checked or delivered for transportation 
by a passenger without making manifest of such contents and the value 
thereof, the carrier shall not be liable therefor and may reject entirely when 
baggage contains any of the articles enumerated in Rule 53 or is, in the 
opinion of the operator or driver, too heavy, too bulky, too fragile, or not in 
proper condition. 

Rule 65. Baggage Allowance. Subject to the limitations in Rule 53 and 
the conditions of Rules 62 and 64, three pieces of hand baggage, not to exceed 
a total weight of one hundred pounds nor exceeding fifty ($50.00) dollars in 
value, shall be checked and carried free of charge for each adult passenger. 
Children traveling on less than adult fare shall be limited on the above basis 
in the proportion that the child's fare bears to the adult fare. No allowance 
shall be permitted on tickets purchased for the sole purpose of avoiding the 
payment of excess baggage. Circulars will be issued prescribing excess bag- 
gage rates. 

Rule 66. Baggage Checked C. 0. D. Excess baggage shall not be trans- 
ported charges collect on delivery, but the charges shall be paid in advance. 

Rule 67. Failure to Check Baggage. Whenever any passenger discovers 
after boarding a bus that he has not checked his baggage, the driver shall 



Claims and Complaints 125 

take a memorandum and description thereof and the baggage shall be for- 
warded on the next available schedule under the same conditions as if, accom- 
panied by a passenger. 

OPERATION 

Rule 68. Operation. Motor vehicles shall be operated in accordance with 
law and these rules and regulations, and drivers shall not operate them in 
any other than a careful and prudent manner, having due regard to the traffic 
and use of the way by others. 

Rule 69. Speed. The maximum speed limit shall be forty miles per hour, 
but the driver, or operator, shall drive at all times so as to be able to stop 
within the range of his vision ; and, when approaching intersecting roads or 
streets, he shall reduce the speed and have the motor vehicle under such 
control that an immediate stop is possible. Subject to the foregoing pro- 
vision, no motor vehicle shall be driven at a speed exceeding the following 
under the following conditions and circumstances : 

(a) Fifteen miles an hour when approaching within one hundred feet 
of an intersecting highway, steam or electric railroad grade crossing, 
curve or bridge when the driver's view is obstructed. A driver's view 
shall be deemed to be obstructed when at any time within the last two 
hundred feet of his approach to such intersection, crossing, curve or 
bridge he does not have a clear and unobstructed view of three hundred 
feet of the roadway over which motor vehicles or cars may approach. 

(b) Fifteen miles an hour when passing schools during opening, clos- 
ing, or recess hours ; when traversing the streets of any city or town 
where there is a frontage on such highway or street of three hundred 
feet or more mainly occupied by business or residential buildings, or both. 

Rule 70. Driving in Dangerous Places. All operators and drivers upon 
approaching bridges, sharp curves, cuts, fills, steep descents or other danger- 
ous places, or in traversing such places, shall slow down and have the vehicle 
under complete control. 

Rule 71. Stops at Railroad Crossings. All motor vehicle operators or 
drivers of passenger motor vehicles shall bring each such vehicle to a full 
stop before crossing a steam or electric interurban railroad track, or tracks, 
such stops to be made not more than fifty feet nor closer than ten feet from 
the nearest rail of the crossing and at points where the clearest view of 
approaching trains, locomotives, or cars may be had. After stopping, drivers 
shall look carefully in each direction for approaching trains, locomotives, or 
cars and if certain that none are approaching, they shall then cross the track, 
or tracks, with the transmission of the vehicle in not higher than second gear 
in the case of selective or progressive type transmission or low gear in the 
case of planetary transmissions. 

Rule 72. Passing and Following Vehicles. The Highway Commission has 
placed dividing lines on all hard surface roads at curves, ascents, descents, 
and other hazardous places, to guide traffic and operators and drivers shall 
not pass other vehicles when within these lines. 

Vehicles Passing to Left. Drivers when about to be overtaken by a 
vehicle shall give way to the right in favor of the vehicle approaching 
from the rear on suitable and audible signal being given by the driver 
of the overtaking vehicle and shall not increase their speed until com- 
pletely passed by the overtaking vehicle. 



12G N. C. Corporation Commission 

Following Vehicles. Vehicles should not be driven following another 
vehicle more closely than is reasonable and prudent with regard for the 
safety of others and with due regard to the speed of the vehicles, the 
traffic and condition of the highway. 

Travel Upon Right Half of Highway. Drivers shall at all times cause 

their vehicles to travel upon the right half of the highway, unless it is 

impassable or obstructed or when passing other vehicles. 

Rule 73. Vehicle Permits and Number Plates Displayed. Motor vehicle 

permits and number plates issued by the Commission for each vehicle being 

operated under the Act shall be displayed at all times on the proper vehicle 

for which each such permit and number plate is issued. Both carriers and 

drivers will be held responsible under this rule. 

Rule 77/. Drivers' Permits Displayed, Motor vehicles before leaving the 
terminals shall have attached thereto on the inside front the driver's permit 
issued by the Commission. 

Rule 75. Passengers Not Permitted to Ride on Outside of Vehicle. Pas- 
sengers shall not be permitted to ride on the running boards, fenders, plat- 
forms, engine hoods, or on any other outside portion of the vehicle. 

DRIVERS 

Rule 76'. General Qualifications. Drivers of motor vehicles shall be Amer- 
ican citizens, twenty-one years of age. of good moral character, shall be fully 
competent to operate the vehicle under their charge, and shall hold a driver's 
permit from the Commission, as provided in Section 9 of the Act. 

Rule 77. Driver's Use of Intoxicants and Drugs. Drivers of motor vehicles 
shall not drink intoxicating liquors or use narcotics during the time they are 
on duty, nor shall they go on duty while under their influence from previous 
use, nor shall they at any time use such intoxicants or drugs to excess. 

Rule 78. Drivers' Smoking While Driving. In the interest of safety, it is 
recommended that drivers of motor vehicles carrying passengers shall refrain 
from smoking during the time the vehicle is in motion. 

Rule 79. Drivers' Conversing While Driving. Drivers and operators of 
motor vehicles carrying passengers shall not carry on unnecessary conversa- 
tion with passengers while the vehicle is in motion. 

Rule 80. When Drivers May Refuse to Carry Passengers. Drivers of 
motor vehicles may refuse transportation to any person who is in an intoxi- 
cated condition or conducting himself or herself in a boisterous or disorderly 
manner or is using profane language. Transportation shall be refused to 
persons bearing loaded firearms or any of the things prohibited in Rule 53, 

Rule 81. Drivers to Check Baggage. Each driver on each schedule shall 
carry a supply of baggage checks and check baggage between stations and 
at non-agency stations. Carriers shall supply drivers with such baggage 
checks. 

Rule 82. Drivers to Report Accidents. Drivers shall report all accidents 
to their employers. If the driver be the owner, he shall report such accidents 
as required in Rule 27. 

Rule 83. Drivers to he Provided ivith Time Pieces. Where motor vehicles 
are not equipped with time clocks set and adjusted daily to United States 
Naval Observatory time, the driver shall be provided with a reasonably 
reliable watch so set and adjusted. 



Claims and Complaints 127 

GENERAL PROVISIONS 

Rule 84. Misrepresentations. Any franchise certificate obtained upon any 
application by any false affidavit or misrepresentation shall be subject to 
revocation and cancellation by the Commission upon discovery by the Com- 
mission of the falsity of the affidavit or of the representation. 

Rule 85. Penalties. Failure to comply with any one or -more of the above 
requirements, or in any way to fail or neglect to comply with the Act or rules 
or regulations adopted by any constituted authority under the Act, may be 
deemed sufficient cause for the Commission to revoke or cancel the franchise 
certificate of a motor vehicle carrier or the driver's permit of the violator, as 
the case may be. 

Rule 86. Savings Clause. This order is for general application and is 
subject to such changes and modifications, permitted by the law, as the Com- 
mission from time to time may determine advisable and is also subject to 
such exceptions as may be considered just and reasonable in individual cases. 

By order of the Commission : 

This 15th day of December, 1927. R. O. Self, 

Clerk and Director of Motor Vehicle Transportation. 

PASSENGER INSURANCE ENDORSEMENT 

The following endorsement was prescribed by the Commission in its order 
of December 6, 1927, as amended by order of December 17, 1927, and is 
required to be attached to all new policies filed on or after January 1, 1928. 
On all policies now on file, and in force, which were filed on or before Decem- 
ber 31, 1927, the endorsement shall be attached on or before February 1, 
1928. The endorsement follows : 

"No condition, provision, stipulation, or limitation contained in the 
policy to which this endorsement is attached or any endorsement thereon, 
nor the violation of any of the same by the assured shall affect in any 
way the right of any person injured in his person (except employees of 
the assured while engaged in operating or caring for the automobiles 
insured hereunder) or property by reason of an act of negligence arising 
from the operation by the assured of any motor vehicle insured here- 
under, nor relieve the company from liability for the payment to such 
person of any judgment to the extent and in the amount set forth in the 
policy ; but the assured hereby agrees to reimburse the company for any 
and all sums of money including loss, costs, expenses, and disbursements 
of every kind which it may pay as a result, direct or indirect, of the 
violation or breach of any of the conditions, provisions, stipulations, or 
limitations in the policy. 

"The liability of the company for damage to property is hereby extended 
to include damage to baggage in the custody of the assured and loss of 
baggage when checked by the assured : Provided, however, that the com- 
pany's liability under this paragraph is limited to fifty ($50) dollars for 
each piece of baggage. 

"The insurance granted under this policy is hereby extended to cover 
any motor vehicle operated by the assured for the transportation of pas- 
sengers for compensation upon the route, or routes, designated in the 
franchise certificate issued by the Corporation Commission of North Caro- 
lina, whether such motor vehicle be specifically named, numbered, or 
designated, in the policy or not and/or any motor vehicle specifically 
named, numbered, or otherwise designated or described sufficiently for 



128 N. C. Corporation Commission 

identification, operated by the assured while actually engaged in the 
transportation of passengers for compensation upon any of the public 
highways of the State of North Carolina. 

"The insolvency, or bankruptcy, of the assured shall not release the 
company from the payment of such damages hereunder as would have 
been payable but for such insolvency, or bankruptcy ; and the prepayment 
of any judgment that may be recovered against the assured upon any 
claim covered by this policy is not a condition precedent to any right 
of action against the company upon this policy, but the company is bound 
to the extent of its liability under the policy to pay and satisfy such 
judgment ; and an action may be maintained upon such judgment by 
the injured person, or his or her heirs or personal representatives, as 
the case may be, to enforce liability of the company as in this policy set 
forth and limited. 

"The policy to which this endorsement is attached shall not be can- 
celled until after ten days' notice, in writing, by the company, shall have 
first been given to the Corporation Commission of North Carolina at its 
office in Raleigh, North Carolina, the said ten days' notice to commence 
to run from the date of receipt of notice by the Commission." 

IN RE AMENDMENT TO THE COMMISSIONS ORDER OF DECEMBER 
6, 1927, WITH REFERENCE TO INSURANCE ENDORSEMENT. 

Order 

Having under consideration the order of December 6, 1927, promulgating 
an insurance endorsement under Sec. 6, Chapter 136, Public Laws 1927, it is 

Ordered, That the first paragraph of the endorsement promulgated in the 
Commission's order of December 6, 1927, be and the same is hereby amended 
by inserting after the word "person" the following: 

(Except employees of the assured while engaged in operating or caring 
for the automobiles insured hereunder.) 
This order shall become effective as provided in the order which it amends. 
By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 17th day of December, 1927. Clerk. 

IN RE UNION PASSENGER BUS STATIONS. 
Order Amending the Commission's Order of June 12, 1925. 

Whereas, since the time the Commission issued its order of June 12, 1925, 
motor vehicle operation has been greatly extended ; now, therefore, it is 

Ordered, That Section 1 of the Commission's order of June 12, 1925, be, 
and the same is hereby, amended by adding the names of the following cities 
and towns, to-wit : Albermarle, Gastonia, Greenville, Henderson ville, Kinston, 
Lumberton, New Bern, Rocky Mount, Shelby, Washington, and Wilmington; 
and it is 

Further Ordered, That Section 1 of the said order be amended by adding 
after the word "establish," in line five, the words "and maintain" ; and it is 

Further Ordered, That the phrase at the end of Paragraph 1 of Section 2, 
"upon the number of motor vehicles of each carrier using the station" be 
changed to read, as follows : "upon the number of departing schedules of 
each motor vehicle carrier using the station." 

This order shall be in force from and after January 31, 1928. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 16th day of January, 1928. 






Claims and Complaints 129 

IN RE SOLICITING AGENTS AT BUS STATIONS. 

Order 

Because of the consolidation of many of the motor vehicle operations, there 
are several lines in the State which, while operating over separate routes, 
have common termini. In an endeavor to attract through passengers, many 
of these operators are employing agents to solicit business in and on the 
premises of several bus stations which is very annoying to the traveling 
public and confusing to the orderly conduct of the several stations. We are 
advised that this has been done in some instances because one or more of the 
operators were of the opinion that they were not receiving impartial con- 
sideration on the part of the station employees. Station employees must be 
impartial in the administration of the station's affairs ; and if not, relief may 
be had by appeal to the Commission to exercise the authority given it under 
Section 7, Chapter 136, Public Laws of 1927. 

The bus business can be improved only by eliminating obsolete methods of 
competition and by attracting the traveling public by more convenient sched- 
ules, reasonable rates, comfortable equipment, and courteous employees. The 
policy of the Commission toward the operators has been one of education 
rather than of coercion, a policy of help rather than of force. The Commis- 
sion prefers to continue this policy if the operators will permit. The State 
owns the highways and whenever an operator lets reasonable public interest 
become secondary, he ceases to deserve the confidence which a grant of fran- 
chise imposes. 

As to station agents and employees, the Commission hopes that its legal 
jurisdiction, "to supervise the operation of union passenger stations in any 
manner necessary to promote harmony among the operators and efficiency of 
service to the traveling public," will not have to be extended either to the 
approval or to the appointment of station employees, but these station em- 
ployees must be impartial in the conduct of the station's business or removal 
will be inevitable. 

Many complaints come from passengers who claim to have been misin- 
formed, or not fully informed, by bus station employees. This may be due, 
in part, to agents or employees not being informed as to schedules and con- 
nections at distant stations. A consolidated schedule will do much to relieve 
this trouble, and agents and employees should certainly inform themselves of 
the connections which all schedules leaving their stations make at the oppo- 
site end. Ignorance of such facts is certainly not excusable. 

In view of the above conditions, it is 

Ordered, That motor vehicle carriers holding franchise certificates under 
Chapter 50, Public Laws of 1925, as amended by Chapter 136, Public Laws of 
1927, shall remove all personal agents form all union bus station premises in 
order that the bona fide employees of such stations may properly perform the 
impartial duties for which they were employed under the order establishing 
such union bus stations ; that holders of franchise certificates shall not solicit 
business on union bus station premises either personally or through their 
drivers or others ; that agents of union bus stations and other employees of 



130 N, C. Corporation Commission 

such stations charged with, the responsibility of giving information in regard 
to time schedules, fares, routes, connections, etc., shall do so impartially and 
in a manner that will inform the inquirer fully. 
By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 23rd day of February, 1928. Clerk. 

THE TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE OF THE NORTH CAROLINA 
COMMISSION ON INTERRACIAL CO-OPERATION v. BUS OPERATORS 
OF THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA: A. & B. COACH LINE, INC., 
ET AL. 

Order 

This matter coming on before the Commission to be considered upon the 
petition filed herein, and being thus considered, and the Commission having 
by letter expressed to Hon. L. R. Varser, of counsel for the petitioner, doubt 
as to jurisdiction of the Commission, and having received answer requesting 
an order in the cause ; and the Commission being of the opinion : 

First. That petition was filed in proper form with the requisite num- 
ber for service upon the defendants named. 

Second. That the petition requires an interpretation of Chapter 136, 
Public Laws of 1927, holding that carriers by bus and truck are common 
carriers and the Commission is without authority to make the required 
interpretation. 

Third. That Chapter 136, Public Laws of 1927, confers upon the Com- 
mission no legislative function enabling it to amend, change, or revise 
the same to the end that rules and regulations may be made by the Com- 
mission regulating carriers and traffic not included in said Act. 

Fourth. That it is the function of the Legislature to include carriers 
by bus and truck within the terms of Chapter 136, Public Laws of 1927, 
as common carriers, and that it must be the clearly expressed intention 
of the Legislature to so include such carriers before the Commission can 
exercise jurisdiction in the respect requested in the petition. 

Therefore, the Commission, ex mero motu treats the said petition as upon 
demurrer to the jurisdiction of the Commission to entertain the petition, and 
sustains this demurrer and dismisses the petition. 

By order of the Commission : K. O. Self, 

This 27th day of February, 1927. Clerk. 

THE TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE OF THE NORTH CAROLINA 
COMMISSION ON INTERRACIAL CO-OPERATION v. BUS OPERATORS 
OF THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA: A. & B. COACH LINE, INC., 
ET AL. 

Order Overruling Exceptions 

This matter coming on to be considered by the Commission upon the excep- 
tions filed by the petitioner and being considered upon said exceptions and 
the record in this case, and it appearing to the Commission upon said con- 
sideration that said exceptions should be overruled, 

Now, Therefore, The exceptions filed by the petitioner, Committee of the 
North Carolina Commission on Interracial Cooperation, are overruled and 
disallowed. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 13th day of April, 1928. Clerk. 



Claims and Complaints 131 

NORTH CAROLINA RE APPLICATION BRISTOL-ASHEVILLE BUS 
COMPANY. 

Before the Corporation Commission 

Order 

The application of the Bristol-Asheville Bus Company having been filed for 
consideration, and having been considered by the Commission upon all the 
record presented by the applicant and opponents to the granting of the peti- 
tion of the applicant, and it appearing to the Commission that the application 
discloses certain information which, in the opinion of the Commission, is in 
violation of the rules and regulations established pursuant to the authority 
granted under Chapter 136, Public Laws of 1927; and being of the opinion 
that the violation of said rules and regulations so made operate as a bar to 
the right of this Commission to grant the petition of the applicant ; and being 
further of the opinion that the offer of the applicant to operate over the 
route from Bristol, Virginia, to Asheville, North Carolina, three Packard 
cars and one Cadillac car, the passenger capacity of each car being only 
seven, would tend to congest the public roads within the State of North Caro- 
lina over which said operation would take place and would not permit safety 
and economy in the passenger transportation by bus within the State of North 
Carolina ; and the Commission feeling that in view of its policy and its rules 
and regulations to refuse franchise certificates for operation where vehicles 
of less than twelve passenger capacity are to be used have been applied gen- 
erally in connection with the granting of franchise certificates, and that the 
enforcement of rules should be uniform as to all applicants for certificates ; 
and being of the opinion that the granting of a franchise certificate to the 
applicant would create discrimination against other carriers of passengers 
by motor bus within the State of North Carolina and operating interstate 
into North Carolina ; and the Commission being desirous of promoting safety 
and economy of bus transportation within the State of North Carolina, and 
being desirous to exclude from operation over its highways of unnecessary 
vehicles engaged in such business ; and feeling that to grant a franchise cer- 
tificate to the applicant would not be in keeping with such policies ; 

It is Now, Therefore, Ordered, Adjudged and Decreed, That the applica- 
tion of the Bristol-Asheville Bus Company be and the same is hereby dis- 
missed, and the franchise certificate requested by said petition is hereby 
denied. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 3rd day of March, 1928. Clerk. 

IN RE LEASES FOR BUS STATION PROPERTY. 
Order 

Whereas, it has come to the attention of the Commission that a number of 
operators are, and have been, in the habit of signing leases for definite periods 
for properties to be used as bus stations ; and, 

Whereas, many properties for which leases have been made are wholly 
undesirable for such purposes, the Commission, after due consideration, thinks 



132 N. C. Corporation Commission 

it to be in the public interest to have no leases made for such purposes by 
any of the bus operators in this State unless and until such properties have 
been approved by this Commission for the purpose for which same are desired 
to be obtained ; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That on and after July 1, 1928, no motor vehicle carrier, or carriers, 
or officers or agents of such carriers, shall enter into any contract for any 
property to be used as a union bus station or as a bus station until such place 
and location has been approved by the Commission in writing. This shall 
apply to acquiring new properties as well as to renewal of leases on property 
in previous use. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 30th day of June, 1928. Clerk. 

LICENSED CERTIFICATES COVERING BUS OPERATIONS AS OF 

JULY 1, 1928 

(Name of Company, Description of Route. Numbers shown are 
State Highway Numbers.) 

A. & B. Coach Line, Inc., R. F. Peebles, Secy., 13 Biltmore Ave., Asheville, N. C. 
Asheville to North Carolina-Tennessee State Line, destination Newport, 
Tenn., 20. 

Albemarle-Salisbury- Wadesboro Bus Line, H. W. Waller, Albemarle N. C. 
Salisbury to North Carolina- South Carolina State Line, destination Cheraw, 
S. C, via Wadesboro and Albemarle, 80. 

R. R. Amnions, Franklin, N. C. 

Franklin to Bryson City, 286; Bryson City to Fontana, County Highways. 
(Bryson City to Fontana operation suspended on account of road condition.) 

Angel, T. W., Franklin, N. C. 

Franklin to Sylva, 285, 10; Franklin to Bryson City, 286, 10; Franklin to 
North Carolina-Georgia State Line, destination Cornelia, Ga., 286 ; Franklin 
to Rainbow Springs, 28. 

Appalachian Bus Co., Inc., Clarence Robertson, Sec, Windom, N. C. 

Asheville to Spruce Pine, 29, 69; Cane River Post Office to North Carolina- 
Tennessee State Line, 692. 

B. & H. Coach Lines, Inc., E. E. Bost, Pres., Newton, N. C. 

Charlotte to Asheville, via Lincolnton, Newton, Hickory and Marion, 27, 16, 

10; Marion to Bakersville, via Spruce Pine, 19. 
Bateman, Charles, Leaksville, N. C. 

Spray to Stoneville via Leaksville, County Road. 
The Bethel-Columbia Bus Line, A. B. Babcock Owner, Tarboro, N. C. 

Bethel to Columbia, 90. 
Blizard & Banks Motor Express, R. A. Blizard and Clarence Banks, Mount 
Airy, N. C. 

Winston-Salem to Mt. Airy, m ; Winston-Salem to Greensboro, 60. 
Blue Nash Touring Car Line, McD. Turner, Owner, Landrum, S. C. 

Hendersonville to Tryon, 29, 191. 
Blue Ridge Bus Line, R. A. Anderson, Galax, Va. 

Mt. Airy to State Line, destination Hillsville, Va., 66. 
Bowman Transfer Company, R. E. Bowman, Chilhowie, Va. 

West Jefferson to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, via Crumpler and 

Grassy Creek, destination Chilhowie, Va., 68. 
Brevard Bus Line, H. F. Corpening, care Union Bus Station, Asheville, N. C, 

Hendersonville to Highlands via Brevard 28; (now being operated between 

Hendersonville and Brevard the remainder to be opened as road conditions 

permit.) Asheville to Oteen 10. 
H. J. Bumgarner, North Wilkesboro N. C. 

North Wilkesboro to Boone, 60. 



Claims and Complaints 133 

Call Motor Company, W. W., Mrs. W. W. Call, North Wilkesboro; Ira D. 

Payne, North Wilkesboro, N. C. 

North Wilkesboro to Statesville via Taylorsville, 18, 67, 90. 

Camel City Coach Co., J. L. Gilmer, Pres. ; T. C. Guerrant, Asst. Treas. ; 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Winston-Salem to Charlotte, 65, 75, 26; Winston-Salem to State Line, des- 
tination Martinsville, Va., 77; Winston-Salem to Walnut Cove, 77, 89; 
Winston-Salem to Mt. Airy, 66; Winston to Greensboro, via Kernersville, 60; 
Greensboro to High Point, 10; High Point to Kernersville, County Road; 
Winston-Salem to North Wilkesboro, 60; Winston-Salem to High Point, 77; 
Lexington to Winston-Salem, 64; Salisbury to Mocksville, 80; Lexington to 
Newsome, via Southmont, Healing Springs and High Rock over County 
Highways; Charlotte to North Carolina- South Carolina State Line, via 
Pineville and Waxhaw, 26. 

Capital Coast Express Co., W. P. Creech, Sec. and Treas., Clayton, N. C. 
Raleigh to New Bern via Goldsboro, Kinston and Pollocksville, 10, 12, 30. 

Carolina Coach Company, H. H. Hearn, General Manager, Raleigh, N. C. 
Raleigh to Greensboro, 10; Raleigh to Rocky Mount, 90; Raleigh to Wilson, 
90, 91; Raleigh to Fayetteville, 21, 60, 22, 21; Smithfield to Fayetteville, 
22; Durham to Chapel Hill, 75. 

Carolina Motor Express, R. E. Mabe and Junie Goldston, Box 353, Spray, N. C. 
Draper to Greensboro, via Leaksville, Spray and Reidsville, 709, 65, 70. 

Carolina Truck Transportation Company, L. P. Sutton, Manager, 56 Broad St., 

New Bern, N. C. 

New Bern to Wilson, 10, 12, 40 via Fort Barnwell, Kinston, Snow Hill, 
LaGrange, Goldsboro, Pikeville, Fremont, Wilson ; New Bern to Kinston, 
30, 12, via Pollocksville and Trenton ; New Bern to Wilson, 30, 91 via 
Bridgeton, Vanceboro, Chocowinity, Grimesland and Chicod, Greenville and 
Farmville ; New Bern to Williamston via Bridgeton, Vanceboro, Chocowinity 
and Washington, 30; New Bern to Wilson, 10, 11, 91 via Fort Barnwell, 
Grifton, Ayden, Winterville, Greenville and Farmville ; New Bern to Rocky 
Mount, 10, 11, 90 via Fort Barnwell, Grifton, Ayden, Winterville, Greenville, 
Bethel and Tarboro ; New Bern to Raleigh, 10, via Fort Barnwell, Kinston, 
LaGrange, Goldsboro, Princeton, Smithfield and Clayton; New Bern to 
Morehead City and Beaufort 10, 101 ; New Bern to Vandemere, 302 via Bay- 
boro and Aurora. 

Carroll's Motor Express, J. T. Carroll, Hallsboro, N. C. 

Wilmington to Hamlet via Whiteville, Clarkton and Lumberton, 20, 21, 
211, 20. 

Carteret Transit Company, D. M. DeNoyer, Beaufort, N. C. 
Beaufort to Atlantic via Davis and Sea Level. 

Caudill, A., North Wilkesboro, N. C. 
North Wilkesboro to Winston-Salem, 60. 

Central Coach Lines Inc., H. F. Moore, Mgr., High Point, N. C. 
Freight Lines: Greensboro to Madison via Stokesdale, County Roads; 
Winston-Salem to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, destination Martins- 
ville, Va., 77; Winston-Salem to Greensboro, via High Point, 77, 10; High 
. Point to Asheboro, 77 ; Greensboro to State Line, destination Danville, Va., 
70; Greensboro to Asheboro, 70; Raleigh to Greensboro, 10. 
Passenger Lines: Wilmington to Carolina Beach, County Roads; Winston- 
Salem to Albemarle, via Walburg, Thomasville and Denton, County Roads. 

Concord and Albemarle Bus Line, J. M. Flowe and J. R. Freeze, Concord, N. C. 
Concord to Albemarle, 74. 

Cox & Foley, John L. Cox and A. W. Foley, Spray, N. C. 

Leaksville-Spray, N. C, to State Line on route to Fieldale Va., 709 and 33. 

Durham-Roxboro-South Boston Bus Line, L. D. Hamlin, Owner, Durham, N. C. 
Durham to Virginia-North Carolina State Line via Roxboro, 13; destina- 
tion South Boston, Va. 

East Coast Express Lines, L. F. Barnard, Owner, 746 Percy St., Greens- 
boro, N. C. 

Greensboro to Wilmington, 70, 24, 22, 211, 21 and 20, via Asheboro, Biscoe, 



134 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Aberdeen Raeford, Fayetteville, Lumberton, Clarkton and Whiteville. 

Edgerton Bus Lines, Inc., 425 W. Washington St., Suffolk, Va., R. G. Edgerton, 

President. 

Edenton, N. C, to Virginia-North Carolina State Line, destination Suffolk, 
Va., 32 and 30. 

Elkin-Alleghany Bus Line, Inc., M. M. Mayberry, Pres., J. W. Arnold, Sec, 

Elkin, N. C. 
Winston- Salem to Elkin, via Yadkinville, Brooks Cross Roads, 60, 26. 

Elizabeth City-Point Harbor Auto Transportation Line, Grandy, N. C, W. E. 

Baum and C. L. Smith. 
Elizabeth City to Point Harbor, 34 and 344. 

ET and WNC Motor Transportation Company, J. E. Vance, Sec, Johnson City, 

Tenn. 
Passenger Line: Spruce Pine to North Carolina -Tennessee State Line about 
three miles beyond Elk Park on route to Johnson City, Tenn., 69 and 29; 
Cane River to State Line, 69. 

Freight Line: Elk Park to Woodlawn, 194 ; Boone and Burnsville, 69 ; New- 
land to Boone via Blowing Rock, 175 and 17. 

Farrar's Motor Express, O. S. Farrar, Owner, Statesville, N. C. 

Statesville to North Wilkesboro, 75, 67 ; Taylorsville to Hickory via Con- 
over, 67 and 10; Statesville to Mt. Airy, 26, 268 and 80. 

Fort Bragg Coach Co., C. F. Harris, Mgr., Fayetteville, N. C. 
Fayetteville to Fort Bragg, 53. 

Fredrickson Motor Express Corporation, 425 W. Liddell St., C. H. Fredrick- 
son, Mgr., Charlotte, N. C. 

Charlotte to Shelby, 20; Charlotte to Statesville, 26; Charlotte to Greens- 
boro, 15, 10 ; Charlotte to Lenoir, via Lincolnton and Hickory, 27, 16, 10, 17 ; 
Salisbury to Statesville, 10; Lexington to Winston-Salem, 64; Shelby to 
Asheville, via Chimney Rock and Hendersonville, 20, 28, 29; Statesville to 
Winston-Salem, 75, 65. 

G. & L. Coach Lines, R. R. Rhyne and G. S. Sparger, Dallas, N. C. 
Gastonia to Lincolnton, 16. 

G. & W. Motor Express, 314 N. Caldwell St., Charlotte, N. C, L. B. Griffin, 

R. 1, Monroe, N. C. B. A. Williams, Norwood, N. C. 

Charlotte to Hamlet, 20 ; Charlotte to Rock Hill, S. C, 26 and 261. 

Gilliam, A. A., Banner Elk, N. C. 

Elk Park to Boone, via Banner Elk and Vilas, 60, 69. 

Goldsboro & Wilson Bus Line, Goldsboro, N. C, Box 120. Geo. B. Patrick 

and J. A. Vinson. 

Goldsboro to Wilson, 40. 

Greensboro-Fayetteville Bus Line, Inc., Asheboro, N. C. H. G. Pugh, Pres., 

J. A. York, Sec. 

Sanford to Rockingham, 74, 50; Greensboro to Fayetteville, via Aberdeen 
and Asheboro, 70, 24; Durham to Fayetteville, via Chapel Hill, Pittsboro, 
Sanford, Jonesboro and Fort Bragg, 75, 53 ; Greensboro to Asheboro, 70. 

Habit Brothers, John and Joe Habit, Edenton, N. C. 

Edenton to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, via Elizabeth City, destina- 
tion Norfolk, Va., 342, 34, 341. 

Hampton Roads Transportation Company, J. L. Wright, Owner, 912 Water St., 

Norfolk, Va. 

Elizabeth City, N. C, to Virginia-North Carolina State Line, via Moyock, 34 ; 
Elizabeth City to Virginia-North Carolina State Line, via South Mills, 34 
and 341. 

Hamrick & Company, Forest City, N. C. J. F. Hamrick and H. C. Kyser. 

Marion, N. C, to State Line near Cliffside on route to Spartanburg, S. C, 

19, 207. 
H. & L. Motor Express Company, Roy Lowder, Sec. and Treas., Albemarle, N. C. 

Charlotte to Sanford, via Albemarle, Badin, Mt. Gilead and Troy, 27, 74, 

515, 51 and 74. 
C. J. Hayter, Abingdon, Virginia. 

Boone to North Carolina-Tennessee State Line, via Vilas, Sugar Grove and 

Zionville, 60. 



Claims and Complaints 135 

R. J. Henderson, Maysville, N. C. 

New Bern to Wilmington, 30. 
Hendersonville-Asheville Motor Express Company, R. F. Styron, Henderson- 
ville, N. C. 

Asheville to Hendersonville, 29. 
Higgins Bus Company, C. C. Higgins, Pres., Burnsville, N. C. 

Burnsville to Marion, via Micaville, Harvard, Busick, Buck Creek, 69, 104, 10. 
High Point-Asheboro Bus Line, J. R. Hinshaw, Asheboro, N. C. 

High Point to Asheboro, via Randleman, 77 and 70. 
Hillsboro-Chapel Hill Bus Line, Hillsboro, N. C. John T. Johnson, Owner, 
care Union Bus Station, Durham, N. C. 

Chapel Hill to Virginia State Line, via Hillsboro and Yanceyville, 14. Same 

route for both passenger and freight lines. 
Hoyle's Bus Transfer, J. M., Gastonia, N. C. 12% W. Main Ave., Box 264, 
J. M. Hoyle, Owner. 

Gastonia to Cramerton, via Lowell, McAdenville and Ranlo, 20. 
Huffman, W. R., Trenton, N. C. 

From Trenton to other cities and towns. (Class F) 
Independent Coach Line, Inc., Waynesville, N. C. W. L. Massie, Pres. ; O. R. 
Martin, Sec. and Treas. 

Asheville to Murphy, 10. 
Independent Touring Car Line, Inc., H. F. Corpening, Pres. Asheville, N. C. 

Asheville to Hendersonville, 29. 
Inter-Carolinas Motor Bus Co., Inc., Joel W. Wright, Gastonia, N. C. 

Shelby to Morganton, 18 ; Gastonia to Cherryville. via Bessemer City, 20 

and County Road ; Gastonia to Clover near State Line on to York and Rock 

Hill, S. C. ; Gastonia to Grover near State Line on to Gaffney and Spartan- 
burg, S. C. ; Rutherfordton to Tryon, 19; Shelby to Rutherfordton, 20; 

Shelby to Lincolnton, 206 and 20; Murphy to North Carolina-Georgia State 

Line, destination Atlanta, Ga., 10. 
Interior Motor Express Co. Inc., R. G. Wallace, Sec. and Treas., Carthage, 
N. C. 

Raleigh to Charlotte, via Sanford. Carthage, Biscoe and Albemarle, 10, 50, 

75, 74, 109,- 51, 515, 74, 27 ; Durham to Sanford, 75. 
Interstate Motor Freight & Express Line, W. R. Vass, Mgr., Galax, Va. 

Mount Airy to North Carolina -Virginia State Line, 66, destination Hillsville, 

and Pulaski, Va. 
Interstate Scenic Coach Line, P. R. Durham, Greenville, S. C. 

Brevard to North Carolina-South Carolina State Line, via Highway 284, 

destination Greenville, S. C. 
Landreth, E. D., Greensboro, N. C. 

Greensboro to Mt. Gilead ; Greensboro to Winston-Salem, 60 ; Greensboro, 

Asheboro and Ramseur, 70 and 75; Greensboro, Salisbury and Statesville, 

10 ; Charlotte, Salisbury, Albemarle, Badin, 15, 80, 21. 
Laurinburg & Southern Railroad Co., G. Y. Jones, Gen. Mgr. Laurinburg, N. C. 

Laurinburg to Raeford, 24. 
Leaksville-Danville Bus Line, J. C. Gilley, Owner, Spray, N. C. 

Leaksville, N. C, to State Line on route to Danville, Va. 
Leaksville-Reidsville Bus Line, Eugene Wilson and A. W. Foley, Spray, N. C. 

Reidsville to Leaksville, 65, 709. 
Leigh & Durham, A. B. Leigh and E. L. Durham, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Durham to Chapel Hill, 75. 
Lenoir-Blowing Rock Line, Inc., L. L. Pipes Vice-Pres., Lenoir, N. C. 

Hickory to Boone, via Lenoir and Blowing Rock, 17 ; Morganton to North 

Wilkesboro via Lenoir, 18. 
Lucas Bus Line, J. P. Lucas, 329 County St., Suffolk, Va. (For transporta- 
tion of colored persons only.) 

Norfolk, Va., to Elizabeth City, N. C, 34. 



136 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Mars Hill Bus Line, A. E. Carter, W. L. Edge, Mars Hill, N. C. 

Asheville to Mars Hill, via Forks of Ivy and Weaverville, 29 and 69. 
Mashburn, G. E., Franklin, N. C. 

Dillsboro to Franklin, 285. 
McBride Transportation Line, R. W. McBride, Biscoe, N. C. 

Winston- Salem to Fayette ville, via High Point, Asheboro, Biscoe, Pinehurst, 

Southern Pines, Aberdeen and Raeford, 77, 70, 75, 702, 50, 70, 24. 
McPherson Bus Line, L. & L. McPherson, 528 N. Road St., Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Elizabeth City to State Line, destination Norfolk, Va., 34 and 341 ; Elizabeth 

City to State Line, destination Norfolk, Va., 34, via Camden, Belcross, 

Gregory, Shawboro, Snowden and Moyock ; Elizabeth City to Washington, 

via Edenton, Windsor and Williamston, 342, 30. 
Miller, S. H. & Son, Canton, N. C. 

Asheville to Waynesville, via Canton, 10. 
Miller Transfer Company, Carl E. Miller, West Jefferson, N. C. 

Boone to Elkin, via Sparta, West Jefferson, 69 and 26. 
Mitchell, J. E., Kinston, N. C. 

Kinston to Washington, via Greenville, 11 and 91. 
Moses, Allen (Colored) Goldsboro, N. C, Allen and Leroy Moses, Owners. 

Goldsboro to Clinton, 40 and 24. 
Murrell's Express, Z. E. Murrell, Jr., Box 138, Jacksonville, N. C. 

Jacksonville to Wilmington, 30. 
George T. Musselman, 304 Nutt St., Wilmington, N. C. 

Wilmington to Southport, via Town Creek, Bolivia, Supply, Shallotte, 30. 
Nash Bus Line, Roy Millhouse, Wilson, N. C. 

Wilson to Rocky Mount, via Elm City and Sharpsburg, 40. 
New Bern-Atlantic Transportation Company, Roy Fulcher, Stacy, N. C. 

New Bern to Atlantic, via Beaufort and Morehead City, 10, 101 and County 

Roads. 
North Carolina- Virginia Motor Express, Inc., F. P. Johns, Sec, Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Mount Airy to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, destination Galax, 

Va., 66. 
Oriental Bus Line, T. H. Stapleford, Oriental, N. C. 

Oriental to New Bern, 302. 
Piedmont Bus Line, 821 Glenwood Ave., P. H. Holt, Greensboro,* N. C. 

Greensboro to Mayodan, via Stokesdale and Madison ; Greensboro to San- 
ford, 60. 
Queen City Coach Company, L. A. Love, Mgr., Charlotte, N. C. 

Asheville to Wilmington, via Rutherfordton and Charlotte, 20; Lumberton 

to Fayetteville, 22 ; Hendersonville to Bat Cave, 28. 
Rapid Transit Company, R. E. Ricks and W. L. Harrington, Greenville, N. C. 

Washington to Wilson, via Greenville, 91 ; Williamston to Rocky Mount, 90 ; 

Greenville to Bethel, 11. 
Red Top Bus Line, W. M. Shelton, Owner, Greenville, S. C. 

Hendersonville, N. C, to State Line at Chestnut Springs on route to Green- 
ville, S. C, 29. 
Reece Transfer, A. C. and W. H. Reece, Zionville, N. C. 

Boone to North Carolina-Tennessee State Line via Vilas and Zionville, desti- 
nation Bristol, Tenn., 60. 
Respass, J. B., Oriental, N. C. 

New Bern to Oriental, 302. 

Royal Blue Transportation Company, Inc., L. F. Barnard, Pres., Greens- 
boro, N. C. 

Greensboro to North Carolina-Virginia State Line, destination Danville, 

Va., 70. 
Safety Transit Lines, Inc., S. T. Gresham, Pres., Raleigh, N. C. 

Raleigh to Weldon, 50, 58, 48, 40; Rocky Mount to Franklinton, 90 and 56; 

Fayetteville to Kinston, via Clinton and Warsaw, 24, 40, 11 ; Raleigh to 



Claims and Complaints 137 

Wilmington, 10, 40. Wilson to Dunn, 22 ; Norlina to State Line, 50 ; Wilson 
to Greenville, 91, operation by lease; Charlotte to Raleigh, via Albemarle 
and Sanford, 27, 74, 50; Durham to Henderson, via Oxford, 57, 75. 
Seashore Transportation Co., James M. West, Pres., New Bern, N. C. 

Wilmington to New Bern, 30 ; Goldsboro to Morehead City, 10, 101 ; also 

Goldsboro to Morehead City, 12, 10, 30 to New Bern, thence via 10 and 101 

to Morehead City ; New Bern to Washington, 30, 91 ; New Bern to Oriental, 
302; New Bern to Beaufort, via Havelock, 10. 
Shore, W. W., Boone, N. C. 

North Wilkesboro to Boone, 60; Vilas to Elk Park, via Valle Crucis and 

Banner Elk, 69 ; Boone to Todd, 69. 
Shugart, C. A., Statesville, N. C. 

Statesville to Elkin, 26. 
Smith-Kirby Transfer, E. H. Kirby, Mgr., Lenoir, N. C. 

Hickory to Boone, via Lenoir and Blowing Rock, 17; Lenoir to Statesville, 

via Taylorsville, 18, 75 ; Morganton to North Wilkesboro, via Lenoir, 18 ; 

Blowing Rock to Linville, 175 ; Linville via Newland, Cranberry and Elk 

Park to State Line, 175, 194. 
Southerland Brothers, A. D. and N. M. Southerland, Goldsboro, N. C. 

Goldsboro to Washington, via Kinston and Greenville, 10, 11, 91. 
Southern Coach Company, G. T. Elliott, Pres., Greensboro, N. C. 

Greensboro to Charlotte, 10, 15, Charlotte to North Carolina-South Carolina 

Line, destination Rock Hill, S. C, 26 and 261. 
Stafford Express, G. R. Stafford, 908 Horton St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Greensboro to Southern Pines, via Pinehurst, Sanford and Carthage, 60, 74, 

702 ; Southern Pines to Fayetteville, via Aberdeen and Raef ord, 50, 70, 24 ; 

Durham to Reidsville, via Roxboro, Prospect Hill and Yanceyville, 13, 14, 

144, 65. 
Stallings Transfer Service, M. L. Stallings, Spring Hope, N. C. 

Raleigh to Rocky Mount, 90 ; Zebulon to Rocky Mount via Wilson, 91 and 40. 
Statesville-Salisbury Coach Company, C. M. Shouse, Mgr., Statesville, N. C. 

Salisbury to Statesville, via Newton 10. 
Statesville-Taylorsville-Lenoir Bus Line, Lee Meadlock, Lenoir, N. C. 

Statesville to Lenoir, via Taylorsville, 18, 75. 
Swanquarter-Belhaven Motor Bus Line, J. Allen Harris, Swanquarter, N. C. 

Passenger Line: Swanquarter to Washington, via Belhaven, 91. 

Freight IAne: Swanquarter to Belhaven, 91. 
Tennessee Transit Company, J. D. Leach, Johnson City, Tenn. 

Asheville to Tennessee-North Carolina State Line, destination Johnson City, 

Tenn., 20, 29, 208, 211. 
Transit Corporation of Norfolk, J. B. Barco, Treas. and Mgr., 210 East 24th 
St., Norfolk, Va. 

Rocky Mount to Weldon, 40; Weldon to Winton, 48; Rocky Mount to Tar- 

boro, 90 ; Tarboro to Rich Square, 12 ; Rich Square to Aulander, 305 ; thence 

via 30 to the North Carolina- Virginia State Line, near Corapeake ; Tarboro 

to Bethel, 90 ; Bethel to Greenville, 11 ; Point Harbor to Sligo, 344 ; Silgo to 

North Carolina-Virginia State Line, destination Norfolk, Va., 34. 
Truck Transfer Company, Bristol, Va.-Tenn., Frank Goodpasture, Pres., Geo. 
K. Taylor, Sec. 

Route 194 from Tennessee-North Carolina Line, near Elk Park, N. C, via 

Cranberry, 69 to Spruce Pine and Burnsville to Forks of Ivy, thence No. 29 

via Weaverville over No. 20 to Asheville; Route 194 Cranberry to Newland, 

thence over No. 175 to Blowing Rock ; Elk Park, via No. 69 to Banner Elk. 
Tuckaseegee Bus Line, Herman Martin, Waynesville, N. C. 

Sylva to Rich Mountain, County Road. 
Weaverville Bus Line, S. L. Moore, Marion Holcombe, Asheville, N. C. 

Asheville to Weaverville, 29. 



138 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Winston-Elkin Motor Express, V. L. Renegar, Elkin, N. C. 

Winston-Salem to Elkin, 60, 26. 
The Woodie Transfer Line, E. O. Woodie, West Jefferson, N. C. 

Passenger Line: North Wilkesboro, N. C, to the North Carolina-Tennessee 

State Line, destination Bristol, via Highways 60 and 68 via West Jefferson 

and Warrensville ; also via Highway No. 60 via Boone and Zionville. 

Freight Line: West Jefferson to North Wilkesboro, No. 68. 
Yelverton Brothers, Inc., C. R. Yelverton, Mgr., Fremont, N. C. 

Weldon to Wilmington, 40; Chadbourn to Wise, 20, 22, 21 and 50, via 

Lumberton, Fayetteville and Raleigh. 



FREIGHT RATES 

NORTH CAROLINA EXCEPTION SHEET NO. 8 

TO 

SOUTHERN CLASSIFICATION 

Supersedes North Carolina Exception Sheet No. 7. Applies to freight 
traffic between points within the State of North Carolina. Applicable to all 
transportation companies. Subject to change on legal notice. Issued May 
15, 1926. Effective June 1, 1926. 

GENERAL RULES 

Minimum Charge. — The minimum charge for small shipments shall be for 
actual weight at the tariff rates, but not less than 50 cents for any single 
shipment. 

When a less than carload shipment moves under a rate made by a combi- 
nation of separately established rates in the absence of a joint through rate, 
the minimum charge of fifty (50) cents will apply to the continuous through 
movement and not to each of the separately established factors. 

Rule to Prevent Overloading of Car With Forest Products 

Cars containing lumber and articles taking lumber rates may be loaded in 
excess of the marked capacity to the extent of ten per cent of the said marked 
capacity, provided that said ten per cent does not exceed 4,000 pounds, and 
cars so loaded will be charged for at the regular carload rating, but if the 
weight in excess of marked capacity of car exceeds 4,000 pounds, the trans- 
portation company may decline to accept same for transportation until the 
load has been lightened to conform to the rule as above. 

In order to arrive at weights, it will be the duty of shippers to furnisr. 
transportation companies information as to the contents of cars, the quantity, 
kind, dimension and condition (whether green or dry), so that an estimate 
can be made of the weight by use of the classification giving estimated weights. 

This rule applies only at points where scale weights are unobtainable. 

Allowance for Weight of Standards, Strips and Supports on Open-Top Cars 

Loaded With Lumber 

An allowance of 500 pounds per car will be made to cover the weight of 
standards, strips, and supports used in securing lumber on flat, gondola, or 
other open-top cars, but in no case shall the charge per car be less than the 
minimum carload weight. 

When two or more cars are used to transport extra length lumber, an 
allowance of 500 pounds will be made for each car used to cover the weight 
of standards, strips and supports, if used, subject to the established minimum 
carload weights applicable for the number of cars used. 

Where dunnage is used, notation shall be made on bills of lading to that 
effect; otherwise, no allowance will be made. 

No allowance will be made on forest products other than lumber when so 
loaded. 

Carload Minimum Weight on Grain and Grain Products 

The carload minimum weight on Grain and Grain Products, except flour, 
in straight or mixed carloads when in packages will be 30,000 pounds. When 
in bulk, minimum weight as shown in Classification and Exceptions governing 
rates will apply. 



(139) 



140 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Estimated Weights When Actual Weights Are Not Ascertained 

Except where otherwise shown in individual items, when the actual weight 
of the articles named below is not ascertained at point of shipment, or at 
destination, or in transit, the following estimated weights shall govern : 

Article Weight 

Clay, per cubic yard 3,000 lbs. 

Gravel, viz.: 

Washed, per cubic yard 2,800 lbs. 

Other than washed, per cubic yard 3,200 lbs. 

Green _ Seasoned 

Laths, Cypress or Yellow Pine, per 1,000 900 lbs. 550 lbs. 

Laths, other than Cypress or Yellow Pine, per 1,000. . . 750 lbs. 500 lbs. 
Lumber, per 1,000 feet, viz. : 
Rough, viz. : 

Ash (black) 5,000 lbs. 3,500 lbs. 

Basswood and Butternut 4,000 lbs. 2,750 lbs. 

Chestnut, Cottonwood, and Cypress 5,000 lbs. 3,000 lbs. 

Gum (red) 5,000 lbs. 3,750 lbs. 

Elm (soft) 5,000 lbs. 3,500 lbs. 

Gum (sap) 5,000 lbs. 3,250 lbs. 

Hemlock 4,000 lbs. 3,000 lbs. 

Hickory 6,000 lbs. 5,000 lbs. 

Oak 6,000 lbs. 4,500 lbs. 

Poplar 4,000 lbs. 3,000 lbs. 

Yellow Pine, under 6 inches in thickness 5,000 lbs. 4,000 lbs. 

Yellow Pine, 6 inches and over in thickness 4,500 lbs. 4,000 lbs. 

White Pine 4.000 lbs. 2,750 lbs. 

N. O. S 6,000 lbs. 4,000 lbs. 

Note. — Rough lumber less than one inch in thickness to be assessed on a proportionate basis of 
above. 

Dressed, viz. : 

Green Seasoned 
Cypress, Gum, Poplar, and Yellow Pine, viz. : 

%-in. Ceiling 1,000 lbs. 

i/ 2 -in. Ceiling 1,300 lbs. 

%-in. Ceiling or Partition 1,600 lbs. 

%-in. Ceiling or Partition 2,000 lbs. 

i% 6 -in. Ceiling, Partition, or Flooring 2.200 lbs. 

Drop Siding 2,200 lbs. 

Shiplap and Tongued and Grooved Boards, %-in 2,300 lbs. 

Shiplap and Tongued and Grooved Boards, i% 6 -in 2.500 lbs. 

Siding, Bevel, from 1-in. stock 1,100 lbs. 

Siding, Bevel, from 1%-in. stock 1,400 lbs. 

Siding, Square Edge, from l^-in. stock 1,600 lbs. 

i% 6 -in. Boards 2,600 lbs. 

N. O. S 4,000 lbs. 2,750 lbs. 

Sand, per cubic yard 3,000 lbs. 

Shingles, green, per thousand 600 lbs. 

Shingles, seasoned, per thousand 500 lbs. 

Staves, Headings, or Hoop Poles, green, car loaded to depth of 

forty-three inches, per car 30,000 lbs. 

Staves, Headings, or Hoop Poles, seasoned, car loaded to depth of 

fifty inches, per car 30,000 lbs. 

Stone, not dressed, per cubic foot 160 lbs. 

Tan Bark, green, per cord 2,600 lbs. 

Tan Bark, seasoned, per cord 2,000 lbs. 

Telegraph Poles, Fence Posts, or Rails, per cord 3,500 lbs. 






Freight Rates 141 

Turpentine, in barrels, per barrel containing not over 52 gallons 
(the weight of each gallon in excess of 52 gallons to be com- 
puted on basis of 7.2 lbs. per gallon) 432 lbs. 

Wood, green, per cord 3,500 lbs. 

Wood, seasoned, per cord 3,000 lbs. 

Rates named in tariffs applying between points in North Carolina are 
governed by the Southern Classification with the exceptions contained herein. 

Explanation of Characters 

1 Stands for First Class S Stands for Special. 

2__ Stands for Second Class. S. U.._ Stands for Set Up 

3 Stands for Third Class. L. C. L Stands for Less Than Carload. 

4 Stands for Fourth Class. C. L Stands for Carload. 

5 Stands for Fifth Class. N. O. S Stands for Not Otherwise Specified. 

6 Stands for Sixth Class. K. D Stands for Knocked Down. 

\ X A Stands for 1 Yi Times First Class. O. R. B. ..Stands for Owner's Risk of Breakage. 

D 1 Stands for Double First Class. O. R. L Stands for Owner's Risk of Leakage. 

3 T 1 Stands for Three Times First Class. O. R. C. ..Stands for Owner's Risk of Chafing. 

4 T 1 Stands for Four Times First Class. 

A, B, C, D, E, F, H, K, L, M, N, O, and P stand for Classes A, B, C, D, E, F, H, K, L, M, N, O, 
and P, respectively. 

Ratings 
Agricultural Implements, C. L., viz. : 

Beams, Plow, loose or in pkgs., 24,000 lbs. min A 

Handles, Plow, loose or in pkgs., C. L., 24,000 min P 

Agricultural Implements, L. C. L. : 

Cotton Choppers ; same as Cultivators. 

Cotton Planters, K. D., packed 4 

Cultivators, K. D., packed 4 

Diggers, Potato ; same as Plows, N. O. S. 

Drills (two-horse), Grain, S. U 1 

Fertilizer Distributors, K. D., packed 4 

Harrows of all kinds and Harrow Frames 4 

Harvesters and Pickers, Cotton 1 

Manure Spreaders, S. U 1 

Mowing and Reaping Machines, Binders and Harvesters, whether com- 
bined or separated, S. U 1 

Planters, Potato ; same as Plows. 

Plow Handles, boxed, crated or in bundles A 

Plow Beams, in bundles A 

Plow Singletrees 5 

Plows, Gang and Sulky, K. D 4 

Plows, N. O. S., set up 2 

Same, K. D / . . 4 

Presses, Cider, Hay, and Cotton, K. D 4 

Rakes, Wheeled, other than Hand, S. U 1 

Tedders, Hay, set up, L. C. L - 1 

Asbestos Products, viz: 
Millboard : 

In boxes or crates or in burlapped rolls, L. C. L 4 

In packages named, carload min. wt. 30,000 lbs 5 

Packing: 

Compounded or reinforced, braid or wick not compounded nor rein- 
forced, in bales or burlap rolls or in barrels or boxes, L. C. L 4 

Same, carload, in packages named, min. wt. 30,000 lbs 5 

Roofing, in rolls, crated, or in cases, L. C. L 6 

Bags : 

Burlaps or Gunny and Burlaps, new or old, in bags or bundles, bales, 
boxes, or rolls, L. C. L q 

Cotton, new or old, clayed or other than clayed, in bales, boxes, 

barrels, or bundles, L. C. L .' 5 

Paper, in bales, boxes, bundles, or crates, L. C L, 6 



142 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Ratings 
Bark, viz. : 

Ground in bags A 

Tan, packed, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than Class K. 
Tan, C. L., minimum when cars of 36 feet in length or over are used, 
24,000 lbs. ; cars under 36 feet in length, 20,000 lbs. Lumber rates. 
Barrels, half-barrels, and kegs, empty, wooden, tight-cooperage, estimated 

wt. 75 lbs. each, L. C. L 5 

Barrels, empty, wooden, C. L., min. wt. 10,000 lbs 6 

Barrels, empty, iron or steel, estimated wt. 100 lbs. each, L. C. L 5 

Baskets, Tobacco, wood splint, without tops or handles, nested, in bundles 

of not less than three baskets, L. C. L 2 

Blinds, Doors, and Frames, L. C. L 4 

Same, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs 6 

Blocks, Concrete Building, L. C. L — K 

Same, C. L., per car 25,000 lbs P 

Boiler or Pipe Covering, asbestos, felt, or magnesia, separate or com- 
bined, in blocks, forms, or sheets : 

In barrels, boxes or crates, L. C. L 3 

Loose or in packages, C. L., 24,000 lbs. min 5 

Boxes, empty, viz. : 

Packing cases or crates, old, which were originally filled with paper 

boxes for knitting factory products, L. C. L 4 

Paper, nested (two or more), packed in wooden boxes or crates, L. C. L. 2 

Paper not nested, packed, L. C. L l 1 ^ 

Paper, folding, K. D., packed, L. C. L 3 

Paper, packed, C. L., min. wt. 10,000 lbs 4 

Brick : 

Common, in barrels, boxes or crates, with or without tops, less car- 
load (see Note), 20 per cent higher than carload. 

Note. — Shipments of common brick will be accepted loose, owners to load and unload, only 
when in quantities of 20,000 pounds or over; Provided, that shipments may be accepted 
in quantities of less than 20,000 pounds and charged for at weight of 20,000 pounds. 

Brick, Hollow and Tile, Building and Roofing, in straight or mixed 
C. L., min. wt. 30,000 lbs K 

Building Material, wooden, consisting of Lumber, rough or dressed, 
Laths, Shingles, Window and Door Frames, Sash (glazed or not 
glazed), Doors (glazed or not glazed), Blinds (glazed or not glazed), 
Carpenter's Mouldings, Balusters, Baseboards, Casings, Porch Col- 
umns, Newels, Stairwork or Wainscoating, mixed C. L., per car 
20,000 lbs. (see Note) O 

Note. — The above classification will not apply on straight or mixed carloads of sash, doors 
and blinds only. 

Canned Goods, viz. : 

Fish, Fish Roe, Oysters, Fruits, Vegetables, Meats and Condensed Milk 
(see note) in metal cans, packed in boxes, crates or barrels, L. C. L. 4 

Note. — Condensed Milk (except in glass or earthenware): Condensed or Evaporated Milk, 
containing vegetables, fat or chocolate and malt, in metal cans; 
Evaporated Cream; 
Milk, powdered or flaked, (will not apply when in glass or earthenware). 

Cans, empty, roving, leatheroid, fiber, paper or tin, for cotton or woolen 
mills, in straight C. L., or with mixed C. L. of cotton or woolen mill 

machinery, min. wt. 24,000 lbs 6 

Cement, viz. : 

Cement, in bags, actual weight ; in barrels estimated weight ; Portland, 
400 lbs. ; N. O. S., 300 lbs., per barrel, carloads 40,000 lbs., minimum K 

Hydraulic, natural or Portland (building cement), in cloth bags, or 
in barrels, L. C. L. ; 20 per cent higher than C. L. rates. 

Hydraulic, natural or Portland (building cement), in cloth bags or in 
barrels, and lime in barrels, mixed C. L., min. wt. 40,000 lbs. ; same 
as cement C. L. 



Freight Rates 143 

Ratings 

Charcoal, Wood viz. : 

Charcoal, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs U 

In cloth sacks, barrels or casks, L. C. L A 

Cheese, packed in wood 4 

Cigarettes, viz. : 

In wooden boxes, strapped or with ends rabbeted 2 

In fibreboard or strawboard packages (as described in Rule 41, Con- 
solidated Classification No. 4), with all flaps firmly glued and fur- 
ther sealed with paper sealing strip covering the box where the outer 
flaps meet, or when secured as provided for in Item 1, Note 2, Para- 
graphs C and D, page 25, Consolidated Classification No. 4, or re- 
issues .,...., ...... ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ** 

In boxes, N. O. S l 1 ^ 

Cigars, boxed ; strapped, corded and sealed, with cording passing through 

each and every board and over each and every seam, in boxes 1 

Cinders, coal, per car 25,000 lbs P 

Clay, viz. : 

Fire, L. C. L., packed K 

Same, per car 25,000 lbs P 

N. O. S., in boxes, barrels, casks or sacks, L. C. L 6 

N. O. S., C. L., per car 20,000 lbs O 

Cornices and Ornamental Work for Buildings, made of sheet or stamped 

metal, plain, galvanized or painted, boxed or crated, L. C. L 1 

Cotton, viz. : 

Cotton, in the boll, in bags or in bulk, C. L., min. wt. 20,000 lbs 6 

Same, in bags, L. C. L S> 

Unginned, packed in bags, 2,000 lbs. and over, L. C. L 5 

Cottonseed Hulls and Meal, mixed or in mixed carloads, or in less than 

carloads; same as Fertilizer. 
Cottonseed Meal, Ashes and Oil Cake. See Fertilizers. 
Cotton Sweepings, Clippings, Motes or Card Strippings in bales, (refuse 
of cotton spinning factories, knitting mills or cottonseed oil mills, 

cotton-gin flues ) , except in bags A 

Dry Goods, viz. : 

Cotton Factory Products, in the original piece, made wholly of cotton, in 
bales, O. R. of chafing, or packed in rolls covered with burlap, or in 
boxes, viz. : Backbands made of cotton webbing, Calicos, Cambrics, 
glazed ; Canton Flannels, plain or dyed ; Canvas, Cottonades, Checks, 
domestic; Cheviots, domestic; Cotton Bags, Cotton Bagging (includ- 
ing brown cotton bagging), Cotton Bath Mats, Cotton Towels, Cotton 
Waste, Crash, linen or cotton ; Denims, Drills, Duck, Ginghams, 
domestic ; Jeans, corset ; Kerseys, Osnaburgs, Plaids, Rope, Sack 
Material, Sheetings, bleached or brown ; Shirting, Silesia, Stripes, 
domestic ; Teazle Cloth, Tickings, Twine, Warp, Webbing, backband ; 

Wicking 5 

Same, unless conditions as above named are complied with ; same as 

Dry Goods, N. O. S. 
Yarn, cotton, on beams, wrapped, owner's risk of damage to beam 

heads, and so stated in bill of lading 5 

Tarn, cotton, in bales or boxes or on beams wrapped and in boxes or 

crates 5 

Felts, cotton (not batting), in bales 5 

Hosiery, cotton 5 

Excelsior, wood, pressed in bales, C. L., min. wt. 20,000 lbs.; Class O 

plus 10 per cent. 
Fish, viz. : 

Dry, dried, salted or smoked, in bulk, in barrels, boxes or crates 5 

Fresh, packed, collect, freight guaranteed by shipper, L. C. L 2 

Fresh, in refrigerator cars, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs.; 6 cents per 
100 lbs. higher than Class B. 



144: N. C. Corporation Commission 

Ratings 

Pickled or salted, in barrels, half-barrels, kegs or kits , 6 

Fruit, dried, L. C. L., viz. : 

Apples, Pears and Peaches, packed 4 

Berries, N. O. S 4 

Fruit, fresh or green, viz. : 

Apples, in bags, barrels, boxes or crates, L. C. L 5 

Blackberries, Dewberries, Peaches, and Strawberries, packed, owners' 

risk, for manufacturing or cold packing purposes, in straight or 

mixed carloads, min. wt. 24,000 lbs 6 

Blackberries and Dewberries, packed for manufacturing purposes, 

L. C. L 5 

Berries, other than Cranberries, packed, prepaid , 1 

Grapes, in casks or barrels, for manufacturing purposes, L. C. L 5 

Grapes, in casks or barrels, for manufacturing purposes, C. L., min. wt. 

24,000 lbs 6 

Peaches, in standard bushel baskets, boxes, or crates, min. wt. 20,000 

lbs 4 

Furniture, C. L., viz. : 

Chairs, finished, K. D., C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs 5 

Chairs, in the white, K. D., C. L., min. wt. 24,00 lbs 6 

Chairs, Settees and Stools, N. O. S., C. L., min. wt., 10,000 lbs 4 

Chair Stuff or Stock, N. O. S., parts not joined together, in the rough 

or in the white, min. wt. 30,000 lbs 6 

Chair Stock, wood, viz. : Bent arms, in crates or bundles, brace, arms, 

in sacks, in the rough, any quantity A 

N. O. S., min. wt. 12,000 lbs 4 

Furniture, all kinds, finished or in the white, taking Fourth Class or 

lower when in straight carloads ; in mixed carload, 12,000 lbs. min. 4 
Furniture, L. C. L., viz.: 

Bedsteads, N. O. S., wrapped or crated 3 

Dressers, Chifferobes and Chiffoniers, wrapped or crated 3 

Chairs, N. O. S., S. U 1 

Chair Stock, wood, viz. : Bent arms in crates or bundles, brace arms in 

sacks, in the rough, and quantity A 

Cots, K. D. or folded 3 

Cribs, K. D. or folded 3 

Desks and Seats, school, S. U. or folded 3 

Same, K. D 4 

Desks, N. O. S., wrapped or crated 2 

Racks, Hat, wrapped or crated, S. U 1 

Sofas, N. O. S., and Tete-a-tetes, wrapped or crated 1 

Stands, hall, wrapped or crated 3 

Tables, K. D., flat 3 

Table Legs, Slides, Leaves and Supports 3 

Wardrobes, wrapped or crated, K. D 3 

Washstands, wrapped or crated 3 

Furniture, not included in foregoing lists, viz. : 

Bookcases, S. U., wrapped or crated 1 

Chairs, wood, with case splint, rattan, reed, willow, bamboo or solid 

wooden seats, whether manufactured of common or hardwood, S. U. 1 

Same, K. D., boxed, crated or wrapped in bundles 2 

Mattresses, cotton, excelsior, fiber, shoddy, shuck or straw 3 

Springs, bed and furniture, compressed and packed in barrels, casks 

or boxes * 3 

Springs, bed, spiral or coil, compressed and crated 3 

Table Rims, wooden (not veneered), packed or securely tied together A 
Glass and Glassware, viz. : 
Bottles, Carboys or Demijohns, old; old bottles, gingerale or other 

nonalcoholic beverages in barrels, bottle carriers or boxes, L. C. L. 6 

Fruit Jars, common, packed, L. C. L 4 



Freight Rates 145 

Ratings 
Mirrors, viz. : 

Over 3 feet, not exceeding 7x12 feet, packed 2 

Three feet or under, packed 3 

Showcases, boxed or crated IV2 

Window Glass, viz. : Common, L. C. L 4 

Grain: 

In bulk, C. L., 40.000 lbs. min > D 

Corn on Cob, in shuck, in bulk, C. L. 30,000 lbs. min D 

Graphite, crude, C. L., per car 25,000 lbs P 

Grits, in bags ; same as Cornmeal. 

Hay, Fodder and Straw, pressed in bales, L. C. L 6 

Hominy, in bags ; same as Meal, corn. 

Husks or Shucks, compressed in bales, L. C. L 6 

Ice, prepaid or guaranteed, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs. (see Note) L 

Note. — With shipments of ice in C. L. lots, 1,000 lbs. of sawdust, chaff, or other packing 
will be allowed free. 

Ice, L. C. L., packed, prepaid or guaranteed ; 100 per cent per 100 lbs. 

higher than C. L. (Not subject to minimum class rate.) 
Iron and Steel Articles (not boxed or crated unless so specified), viz.: 
Bars, grate (each shipment weighing 200 lbs. or over in one or more 

pieces ) , L. C. L A 

Castings, viz. : 

In boxes, kegs, barrels, casks or crates (not machinery or sewing 
machines ) 5 

Unpacked (not machinery, parts thereof), each piece weighing 

under 200 lbs 5 

Castings, weighing over 200 lbs. ; see Special Iron. 

Covers, manhole, packed and contents described, or in bundles, wired 5 

Dog Irons, cast; same as Castings. 

Flue, iron ; same as sheet Iron. 

Iron, sulphate of, shipped to fertilizer factories ; see Fertilizers. 

Forgings ; same as Castings. 

Lathing, expanded iron 5 

Nails, in boxes (horse and mule shoes) 5 

Picks, in bundles, barrels or kegs ; see Special Iron. 

Pipe Joints or Fittings, consisting of Elbows, Traps, Tees, Crosses, 

Bushings, Plugs, Couplings and Caps (made entirely of iron, and 

without brass or other trimmings or fixtures) (see Note), packed 

or not packed, L. C. L 6 

Same, C. L. ; see Special Iron. 

Note. — The above ratings will apply on Elbows, Traps, Tees, and Crosses, with brass screw 
clean-out plugs or brass or bronze stay-rods. 

Rails, iron or steel, any quantity A 

Safes, viz. : 

Each weighing over 3,000 lbs. and not over 6,000 lbs 3 

Each weighing 3,000 lbs. or less 4 

Scrap Iron, packed or loose, C. L., min. wt. 40,000 lbs K 

Same, packed, L. C. L A 

Sheet Iron, viz. : 

Cut in strips for stove pipe, nested flat and crated 6 

Plain, Galvanzed or Corrugated 6 

Iron and Steel, special, consisting of the following articles : 

Note. — 'Commodity rates on "Special Iron" will apply on all articles enumerated in the 
following list. In the absence of commodity rates, Class A rates will apply. 

Architectural and Structural, consisting of Columns, Pedestals, Capi- 
tals, Saddles, Door and Window Jambs, Plates, Sills, Studding, Lin- 
tels, Rolled Beams, Angles, Channel Bars, Girders and Tees or 
Zees A 

Axles, car !!...!!! A 



146 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Ratings 

Axles, carriage or wagon, loose or wired together A 

Bar, Band, Hoop, Rod, Plate (not planished or polished), Boiler, all 

unpacked A 

Bar, steel, or steel bars, polished or not polished, packed or unpacked A 

Bolts, Nuts, Rivets and Washers, packed or in bags or bundles A 

Boxes and Skeins, vehicles, in kegs, barrels or casks A 

Boxes and Skeins, wagon, axle, loose, owners to load and unload, C. L. A 

Bridge Material A 

Castings (not machinery or parts thereof), each piece weighing 200 

lbs. or over, unpacked, O. R. B A 

Castings or Forgings, parts of compresses, each piece weighing 2,000 

lbs. or over, owners to load and unload A 

Castings, C. L., viz. : Castings, rough, N. O. S. (not machinery nor 
parts thereof, nor sewing machines nor parts thereof, nor stove cast- 
ings ) , packed in kegs, barrels, or loose A 

Chains, in barrels or casks . A 

Chains, loose or in coils A 

Crowbars A 

Draft Iron A 

Elevator Weights. . . ., A 

Filings, Iron A 

Fishbars, Fastenings, and Rail Braces A 

Frogs, Railroad A 

Harrow Teeth, in kegs or barrels A 

Jail Plate A 

Lap Rings A 

Mattocks, in bundles, barrels or kegs . A 

Nails and Spikes, in kegs, estimated weight 106 lbs. per keg A 

Nails and Spikes, in double kegs, estimated wt. 208 lbs. per keg A 

Nails, cement coated, in kegs A 

Nails, wire, in kegs, estimated wt. 106 lbs. per keg A 

Nails, wire, in double kegs, estimated wt. 208 lbs. per keg A 

Picks, in bundles, barrels or kegs A 

Pipe, cast A 

Pipe, lined with cement A 

Pipe Joints or Fittings, consisting of Elbows, Traps, Tees, Crosses, 
Bushings, Plugs, Couplings and Caps (made entirely of iron, and 
without brass or other trimmings or fixtures) (see Note under Pipe 

Fittings, L. C. L.) , packed or not packed, C. L A 

Pipe Fittings, wired in bundles, C. L A 

Pipe, wrought, all kinds, including conduit A 

Plow Clevises, Couplers, Frogs, Heel Bolts, Moulds, or Plant Fenders 

(in bundles, or in kegs, barrels or casks), Plates, Points and Wings A 

Plow Steel A 

Poles, electric light or railway A 

Posts, fence, railroad A 

Rust, iron A 

Sadirons, in barrels or casks, released A 

Sadirons, in boxes, contents to be plainly marked on boxes, and con- 
tract to be made by shipper that no other articles shall be put in 

the boxes A 

Sash Weights, unpacked A 

Shoes, horse, mule and ox, in kegs (estimated weight 106 lbs. to keg) A 

Stand Pipes, K. D A 

Staples, fence, in barrels or kegs A 

Timber Hangers A 

Tires, wagon A 

Trucks, car A 

Trusses, Bridge or Building A 

Wheels, car A 



Freight Rates 147 

Ratings 
Wire, fence, iron (not woven), on reels or in coils, loose or packed in 
barrels, O. R. of wet and rust A 

Note. — On mixed carloads of iron fence and wire nails the carload rate on the highest classed 
article may be applied. 

Tubs, viz. : 

Tubs, bath 3 

Tubs, galvanized iron, closely nested 3 

Vises 4 

Kainit, when shipped to fertilizer factories ; see Fertilizer Material ; 

when in less than 25-ton shipments, Fertilizer rates apply. 
Knitting Factory Products, made wholly of cotton, in bales O. R. C, or 
in boxes when specific name of article and shippers' name are 
plainly marked on outside of package and stated in receipt or bill 

of lading 5 

Leather, in bales or rolls or boxes, L. C. L 3 

Lime, viz. : 

Other than spent, in packages or bulk, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs., 

actual weight to be charged for ; Class K less 10 per cent. 
Same, in waterproof bags or barrels, L. C. L. ; 20 per cent higher than 
C. L. 

Acetate of, L. C. L 6 

Same, C. L. ; same as Fertilizers. 
Carbonate of, in barrels or casks ; same as Lime. 

Chloride of, in barrels or casks 6 

In barrels, and Cement in bags or barrels, mixed C. L., min. wt. 40,000 
lbs. ; same as Cement, C. L. 
Slaked, for agricultural purposes, in bulk or bags ; 20 per cent less than 

Fertilizers. 
Livestock, subject to Rules, Estimated Weights and Valuation of South- 
ern Classifications. 

Livestock, L. C. L 4 

Locks, viz. : Padlocks and Rim-locks 3 

Lumber, native wood, rough or dressed (see Notes 1 and 2), C. L. 24,000 

lbs. min P 

Lumber, native wood, rough or dressed (see Notes 1 and 2), L. C. L. ; 
20 per cent higher than Class K. 

Note 1. — The following articles will take Lumber rates: Barrel Material (Cooperage stock); 
Box Material or Shooks for manufacture of packing cases or crates (not including Cigar Box 
Material); Casings; Ceiling (Wooden); Cooperage Stock; Cross-arms, Wooden; Cross-ties; 
Flooring; Heading and Heading Bolts; Hoop Poles; Hoop Splits; Hoops; Laths; Lumber 
Laths and Shingles in Mixed Carloads; Mouldings, Carpenters, Without Ornamentation; 
Paving Blocks, Wooden ; Pickets Wooden ; Piles ; Planks or Boards, edges glued together ; Poles, 
Hoops, Telegraph and Telephone; Posts, Fence; Shingles and Shingle Bolts; Siding; Shooks, 
Boxed or crated (not including Cigar Box Material) ; Shooks, Barrel Casks or Hogshead; 
Spoke Timber in the rough; Staves and Stave Bolts; Tank Material; Telegraph Cross arms 
(without insulator pins or brackets) ; Ties, railroad ; Timber, N. O. S. ; Tobacco Box Material. 
Note 2. — In the absence of scale weights, the following estimated weights will be used: 

Laths, green, per 1,000.. 530 lbs. 

Laths, dry, per 1,000 450 lbs. 

Lumber, short leaf rough pine, seasoned, per 1,000 ft 3, 300 lbs. 

Lumber, rough spruce, seasoned, per 1,000 ft 2,600 lbs. 

Lumber, rough spruce lumber, green, per 1,000 ft 3, 000 lbs. 

Shingles, green, per 1 , 000 350 lbs. 

Shingles, dry, per 1,000 300 lbs. 

Machinery and Machines (see Note), C. L., viz.: 

N .0. S., all kinds, boilers, engines or parts thereof, min. wt. 24,000 lbs. 6 

Note. — Will not apply on tractors. 

Machinery and Machines, L. C. L., viz. : 
Cotton and Woolen Mill Machinery, viz.: 

Beams, wooden, warp, cylinders, spools, bobbins, and shuttles, old 6 

Bobbins, Shuttles and Spools, wooden, packed 5 

Card Flats, old 6 

Rollers, iron and steel to be repaired or recovered, rating to apply to 

both directions 4 



148 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Ratings 

Engines and Machinery, hoisting 4 

Pulleys ; 5 

Pulley Wheels and Blocks, manufactured wholly of iron, wired in 

bundles 4 

Marl, C. L., min. wt. 40,000 lbs. ; 10 per cent higher than rate on Sand. 
Marl or Green Sand, L. C. L., (not taken in bulk), 80 per cent of less 

carload Fertilizer rate 
Meal, viz. : 

Soy or Soja bean ; Fertilizer rates. 

Corn, N. O. S., except when in paper packages (see Note) D 

Note. — L. C. L. shipments of meal, in cloth bags, each package weighing less than 21 pounds, 
will not be accepted unless enclosed in burlap, jute, or duck bags. Bill of lading and way- 
bills for shipment of meal in bags must show number of bags of each size, weighing 21 
pounds or over, and the number of burlap, jute, or duck bags containing bags weighing less 
than 21 pounds contained in the shipment. 

Linseed-oil Meal ; same as Meal, Cottonseed ; see Fertilizers. 
Meats, all shipments to be charged at actual weight, viz. : 

Fresh, packed or wrapped, L. C. L 3 

Sausage, fresh, packed 4 

Sausage, smoked, packed, L. C. L 6 

Sausage Casings, in barrels or kegs 4 

Melons, prepaid, in barrels with cloth or slatted wooden tops ; in baskets 
with solid or slatted wooden tops ; or in barrels, boxes or crates, 

L. C. L 5 

Melons, C. L. ; per car 20,000 lbs O 

Mica, viz. : Mica, scrap and ground, in bags or barrels, L. C. L 5 

Molasses, viz. : 

Shipments of molasses will be accepted at an estimated weight of 
12% lbs. per gallon, including package, the gallonage to be taken 
from the marks on the barrel as stenciled by authorized gaugers. 

In barrels or hogsheads 6 

In tank cars, C. L»., subject to Rule 35, Southern Classification 6 

Marble and Granite (other than Gravestones, Tombstones, Monuments, 
or parts thereof) : 
Blocks or Slabs, marble, slate, granite or stone, rough quarried, not 
packed; also sawed, sand-rubbed (or slushed), hammered or chisel- 
ed, boxed or crated, L. C. L A 

Same, C. L. ; when blocked in or on cars, per car 30,000 lbs P 

Chips or Cubes, rough or dressed for inlaid or mosaic tiling, L. C. L. 6 
Monuments, Gravestones and Tombstones, viz. : 

Marble or granite, not boxed Dl 

Marble or granite, all kinds, N. O. S 1 

Marble, granite, cement or concrete, including parts of monuments, 
gravestones (lettered or not lettered, but not sculptored), and not 

including statuary, in boxes or crates, L. C. L. 4 

Same, C. L., min. wt. 30,000 lbs 6 

Nuts, packed in bags, boxes or barrels, viz. : 

Peanuts and Chufas, L. C. L 5 

Nuts, packed in. double bags, boxes, or barrels, viz.: 

Chestnuts, L. C. L 5 

Oatmeal, Rolled Oats, or Shredded Oats, in boxes, barrels, kegs, or 

drums q 

Oils, viz.: 

Cotton-seed, in barrels, crude, L. C. L A 

Cotton-seed, in barrels, C. L., 30,000 lbs. min A 

Cotton-seed, in tanks, governed by the following rules, viz. : 

1. Rates when in tank cars will be assessed on basis of shell capacity in gallons, multiplied 
by 7 Y2 lbs. per gallon. 

2. Tank cars must invariably be loaded to their full capacity, subject to a min. wt. of 24,000 
lbs. 

In tank cars, C. L A 

Creosote or Dead Oil, in barrels, L. C. L 4 



Freight Rates 149 

Ratings 

Oil, Petroleum and Petroleum Products (notes and estimated weights as 
' per Consolidated Classification) : 

Crude Oil Distillates, Fuel Oil, Gas Oil, Grease (not axle), Refined 
(illuminated or burning) Oil, Lubricating Oil (not axle grease), 
Miners' Oil, Paraflin Oil, Paraflm Wax, Road Oil, Soap Oil, Trans- 
former Oil, and Wool Oil, Benzine, Gasoline, and Naphtha, viz. : 

In metal cans, in boxes, L. C. L 4 

In bulk, in wooden, iron or steel barrels, L. C. L *4 

*Will not apply on Benzine, Gasoline, Naptha or Petroleum Liquified Gas in wooden barrels. 

In packages named, C. L., 26,000 lbs. min *6 

In tank cars, C. L., min. shell capacity of tank based on 6.6 lbs. per 

gallon 6 

Paper, viz. : 

Glazed, for manufacture of paper boxes or for wrapping purposes, in 
boxes, crates, rolls or bundles 6 

Printing, in boxes, crates, rolls or bundles, L. C. L 6 

Roofing (not composition roofing), in rolls, bundles or crates 6 

Strawboard and Pulpboard; same as Paper, wrapping. 

Wall, in bundles, boxes or crates 3 

Wrapping or Lining, in bundles, rolls or crates, L. C. L 6 

Peas, viz. : 

Dried or split, in boxes, bags or barrels D 

Same, in packages or bulk, C. L., 36,000 lbs. min D 

Pickles, viz. : 

In buckets or pails, wooden, L. C. L 4 

In kegs, barrels or casks, L. C. L 5 

Pipe, viz. : 

Earthen and concrete, drain or roofing (pipe and tile), L. C. L 5 

Same, C. L., min. wt. 26,000 lbs., subject to packing requirements at- 
tached to Class A rating Southern Classification (E. H. Dulaney's 
I. C. C. No. 19, supplements thereto or reissues thereof) A 

Earthen or concrete, farm drain or sewer, C. L., per car 25,000 lbs., 
subject to packing requirements attached to Class A rating in 
Southern Classification (E. H. Dulaney's I. C. C. No. 19, supple- 
ments thereto or reissues thereof) P 

Same, L. C. L K 

Pipe, sewer, earthen or concrete, and fixtures ; flues, flue linings, flue 
tops and chimney caps, and drain tile, earthen or concrete ; in mixed 
carloads, per car 25,000 lbs., subject to packing requirements at- 
tached to Class A rating in Southern Classification (E. H. Dulaney's 
I. C. C. No. 19, supplements thereto or reissues thereof) ; 25 per 
cent higher than Class P. 

Pitch, in barrels or casks, N. O. S., C. L., 40,000 lbs. min K 

Plaster, viz. : 

Calcined, C. L., 40,000 lbs. min K 

Calcined, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than C. L. rate. 

Cement ; same as Cement. 

Land ; same as Agricultural Lime. 

Plaster of Paris, L. C. L 6 

Same, C. L., 40,000 lbs. min A 

Wall, in bags or barrels, C. L., 36,000 lbs. min. ; Class K. less 10 per 
cent. 

Wall, in bags, barrels or boxes, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than C. L. 
rate. 
Plates, viz.: 

Wooden, including Wooden Butter Dishes and Plates, C. L., min. wt. 
15,000 lbs 6 

Wooden Plates or Dishes, nested, packed in crates or boxes, L. C. L. 5 
Porch Columns, wooden; same as Blinds, Doors and Frames. 
Potash, muriate and sulphate, when shipped to fertilizer factories ; see 
Fertilizers. 



150 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Ratings 

Preserves, Fruit, Butter, and Jellies, viz : 

In glass, packed, L. C. L 3 

In wood, L. C. L 4 

In cans, boxed, L. O. L 4 

Pumps and Pump Material, viz. : 

Steam Pumps, Pumping Engines, and Machinery, L. C. L 4 

Wooden Tubing, loose or in packages, L. C. L 5 

Rags, viz. : 

In bags or bales, not machine pressed, L. C. L 3 

In barrels, crates, or hogsheads, L. C. L 4 

Railroad Rolling Stock Equipment: 

Locomotives, standard gauge, subject to the following rules : 

Basis for Calculation of Freight. — Mileage rates between points governed by this Exception 
Sheet will be computed upon the basis of the shortest all-rail standard-gauge mileage by- 
available routes of transportation, plus actual arbitraries, subject to a minimum distance 
of 75 miles for each line, and governed by the mileage shown in individual mileage tarriffs, 
of carriers, parties to this Exception Sheet, lawfully on file with the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. 

Locomotives and Tenders, moved by their own power, owner to 
furnish fuel and crew, carrier to furnish pilot at expense of owner, 
17 cents per mile. 
Locomotives and Tenders, dead or on their own wheels, connecting 
rods and small parts liable to be damaged, at option of carrier, 
to be taken off and boxed, 23 cents per mile. All expenses for oil, 
waste and repairs are in addition to the rates and will be at the ex- 
pense of the owner. 
Locomotives and Tenders, loaded wholly on flat cars, 28 cents per mile. 
Locomotives, loaded on flat cars and weighing less than 40,000 lbs., 
same as Machinery, N. O. S. 
Roofing, viz. : 

Cement, in metal cans, in barrels or boxes, or in tubs, kits, pails 

or barrels, L. C. L 5 

Slate, in boxes or crates, L. C. L 6 

Slate, C. L., min. wt. 40,000 lbs K 

Roots and Herbs, all kinds, in bags, boxes or barrels, L. C. L 4 

Roots, ivy, C. L., per car 24,000 lbs P 

Rosin, in barrels, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than Class K. 

Rosin, in barrels, C. L., 36,000 lbs. min K 

Rosin Dross ; apply Rosin rates. 

Salt, in bulk, in bags, boxes or barrels, C. L. min. wt. 45,000 lbs. (see 

note) 

In bags, boxes or barrels, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than carload 
rates. 

Note. — Where Class O rates are stated per car the rate on salt will be 225 per cent of Class 
O per car of 20,000 pounds. 

Salt Cake ; see Fertilizers. 

Sash, viz. : 

Glazed, in boxes, crates or cleated, L. C. L 4 

Glazed, in packages named, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs 6 

Unglazed, in boxes, crates or cleated, C. L., min. wt. 16,000 lbs 6 

Unglazed, in boxes, crates or cleated : same as Blinds. 

Sawdust, C. L., per car 24,000 lbs P 

Screens, viz. : 

Door or Window, of wire, in bundles, boxes or crates, L. C. L 4 

Door or Window, of wire, C. L., min. wt. 18,000 lbs 6 

Sea Grass, Sea Weed, or Salt Hay, pressed in bales, C. L., 20,000 lbs. 
min., 20 per cent less than Class D. 

Showcases ; see Glass and Glassware. 

Slush, Soap, Stock or similar material for manufacturing soap, in 
barrels : same as Cottonseed Oil. 

Soap Stock ; same as Cottonseed Oil. 



Freight Rates 151 

Ratings 

Soda, viz.: 

Nitrate of, L. C. L. ; same as Fertilizers, L. O. L. 
Nitrate of, C. L. ; see Fertilizers and Fertilizer Material, C. L. 
Sulphate of, C. L. ; same as fertilizers, C. L. 
Stoves and Ranges, cast iron, L. C. L. Box and crate requirements 

will not apply. 
Sugar, in barrels or hogsheads, or in cartons or sacks packed in boxes 
or in single (see Note) or double sacks 6 

Note. — Ratings will apply when the bag is made of cotton cloth weighing not less than 5.6 
ounces per square yard and having not less than 96 threads to the square inch, including 
warp and filling, and of tensile strength not less than 61 pounds in the warp and 68 pounds 
in the filling, or osnaburg (Cotton Cloth) not less than 7 ounces to the square yard, and hav- 
ing not less than 68 threads to the square inch, including warp and filling, and of tensile 
strength not less than 61 pounds in the warp and 68 pounds in the filling, or when the bag 
is made of single cropped and mangled or double calendered burlap weighing not less than 
10 l A ounces per yard, 40 inches wide, and counting not less than 11 porter (warp) and 12 
shots (filling), tensile strength to be not less than 61 pounds in the warp and 68 pounds in 
the filling. Tensile strength to be determined by what is commercially known as the 
strip test. 

Sumac, viz. : 

Leaf, C. L., min. wt. 20,000 lbs K 

Same, in bags or bales, L. C. L 5 

Tallow, in barrels or boxes B 

Tankage, for fertilizer purposes, 0. L. ; see Fertilizer. 

Tar, Coal, in barrels, L. C. L A 

Same, C. L., 40,000 lbs. min K 

Tar, in barrels, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than Class K. 

Tar, in barrels, L. C. L., 40,000 lbs. min K 

Tar Residuum ; same as Tar. 

Tar, Coal, in tank cars, minimum weight capacity of tank to be charged 
for at estimated weight of 8% pounds per gallon K 

Tile, viz. : 
Drain and Roofing ; see Pipe. 

Building and Roofing and Hollow Brick, in straight or mixed C. L., 
min. wt. 30,000 lbs K 

Tin, viz. : 

Tin and Terne Plate, in boxes, charged at actual weight, L. C. L. . . . 5 
Tin Roofing, in rolls, crates or boxes, L. C. L 5 

Tobacco, viz. : 

Smoking 2 

Unmanufactured, in boxes, barrels, crates or bales 4 

Unmanufactured, leaf, packed in baskets (see note) 4 

Unmanufactured, in hogesheads or tierces 5 

Unmanufactured, loose, in car or on the stick, or in baskets, C. L., 
min. wt. 10,000 lbs 4 

Note. — Packing requirements: Hands must be placed in tobacco shipping baskets with 
leaves extending towards the center of the basket, the butts of stems towards the outside, 
another basket placed inverted on top of the tobacco, pressed down tightly and with not 
more than 30 inches of space between rims of baskets, the two baskets to be fastened securely 
by tightly drawn wires (No. 12 gauge or thicker) completely encircling the package on all 
sides, not less than six wires to be used, ends of wires to be clinched or otherwise secured 
that they will not come apart. 

Tobacco Trash, Sweepings or Stems, ground or unground, packed, L. C. 
L. or in bulk when in carloads ; Fertilizer rates. 

Tongue, deer, in bags, bales or boxes, L. C. L 5 

Twine, viz. : Jute, packed, L. C. L 5 

Vegetables, not canned or desicated, viz. : 

Beets, in barrels, bags, baskets, boxes or crates 6 

Cabbage, in bags, baskets, boxes or crates, L. C. L 6 

Carrots, in barrels, bags, baskets, boxes or crates 6 

Cucumbers ; same as Beets. 

Onions, in sacks, L. C. L 5 

Onions, in barrels, baskets, boxes or crates, L. C. L 6 

Potatoes, in crates or sacks, L. C. L 6 

Potatoes, in barrels, bags, baskets, boxes or crates, L. C. L 6 

Turnips, in barrels, bags, baskets, boxes or crates, L. C. L 6 

N. O. S., packed, prepaid or guaranteed 3 



152 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Ratings 
Vehicles, viz. : 

Carriages, Buggies, and Trotting Wagons, viz.: 

K. D., boxed or well crated, box or crate not exceeding 34 inches in 

height, L. C. L 2 

Boxed or well crated, C. L., min. wt. 10,000 lbs 4 

Loose, C. L., min. wt. 15,000 lbs 3 

Vehicles, Horse Drawn, viz. : 

Trucks or Wagons, Farm, with or without bodies without springs. 

Bodies K. D. or flat, or without bodies, gears K. D., loose L. C. L. 4 
Trucks, drays or wagons, delivery or freight, with or without springs 
(see Note). Loose wheels and shafts detached, actual weight sub- 
ject to minimum charge of 1,000 lbs. each at first class rate, L. 
O. L Dl 

Note. — This description will not cover heavy teaming vehicles. 

Vehicle Material and Parts of Vehicles, viz : 

Bodies, finished, carriage, buggy, trotting wagon and wagon ; same 

as Carriages, Buggies, Trotting Wagons, and Wagons, respectively. 
Bodies and Seats, unfinished ; same as Wheels. 

Hubs, packed in roll or securely tied together A 

Rims, packed or securely tied together A 

Shafts, Bows, Felloes, Singletrees, Spokes, Hubs and Rims, wood, 

unfinished, L. C. L 5 

Spokes, in the rough, packed in bundles A 

Same, C. L., loose or in bundles P 

Wheels, unfinished, L. C. L 4 

Wheelbarrows, viz : Iron or wood, K. D., trays nested and strapped, 

wheels and handles packed separately, L. C. L 4 

Wood : 

Veneer, unfigured, made from woods other than woods of value; 

Lumber rates. 
Veneer, figured, or made from woods of value ; Lumber rates plus 15 

per cent. 
Built-up wood faced with unfigured veneer of woods other than woods 

of value; Lumber rates plus 10 per cent. 
Built-up wood faced with figured veneer, or veneer of woods of value ; 

Lumber rates plus 15 per ceLt. 

Note. — Woods of Value: boxwood; Spanish cedar; cherry; cocobolo; ebony; Granadilla; iron- 
wood; lancwood; lignumvitae; mahogany; rosewood; sandalwood; satinwood;$teakwood; ver- 
milion; walnut. 

Wool, viz. : 

In bags, two or more securely corded together or pressed in bales 3 

Unwashed, in bags 4 

Addition s — Changes 

NOW READS Ratings 

Brick : 

Common, in barrels, boxes or crates, with or without tops, less carload 
(see Note), 20 per cent higher than carload. 
Note. — Shipments of common bricks will be accepted loose, owners to load and un- 
load, only when in quantities of 20,000 pounds or over : Provided, that shipments may 
be accepted in quantities of less than 20,000 pounds and charged for at weight of 
20,000 pounds. 

CHANGED TO READ Ratings 

Brick : 

In barrels, boxes or crates, with or without tops, less carload (see Note), 
20 per cent higher than carload. 

Note. — Shipments of common bricks will be accepted loose, owners to load and un- 
load, only when in quantities of 20,000 pounds or over : Provided, that shipments may 
be accepted in quantities of less than 20,000 pounds and charged for at weight of 
20,000 pounds. 

By Order of the Commission. 
Issued Aug. 9, 1928. 
Effective Aug. 25, 1928. 

R. O. SELF, 

Clerk. 



CAR DEMURRAGE RULES AND CHARGES 

APPLYING ON 

INTERSTATE TRAFFIC AT ALL POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

APPLICATION 

The Car Demurrage Rules and Charges, published herein, apply on In- 
trestate traffic at all points on the railroads in North Carolina. 

Note. — The disposition at point of detention determines the purpose for which a car is held and the 
rule applicable thereto, except where there is specific tarriff provisions to the contrary. 

Rule 1 — Cars Subject to Rules 

Section A. — Cars of either railroad or private ownership, held for or by 
consignors or consignees for loading, unloading, forwarding directions or for 
any other purpose (including cars held for loading company material unless 
the loading is done by the railroad for which the material is intended and 
on its tracks) are subject to these demurrage rules, except as provided in 
Section B. 

Section B. — The following cars are not subject to these demurrage rules: 

1. Cars under load with company material for use of and consigned to 
the railroad in whose possession the cars are held. 

2. Cars under load with livestock. This exemption does not include cars 
held for or by shippers for loading livestock. Live poultry will not be con- 
sidered as livestock. 

3. Empty cars placed for loading coal at coal mines, coal mine sidings, 
coal washers, or coke ovens located at or adjacent to the mines producing 
the coal used in making the coke, and such cars under load with coal, at 
such mines, mine siding or coal washers, or with coke at such coke ovens: 
Provided, however, that this exemption applies only at mines, coal washers 
and coke ovens, at which car distribution rules are applied in lieu of de- 
murrage rules. (See Note 1 to Rule 2, Section B, paragraph 1.) 

Note. — Coke ovens shall not be considered as adjacent to coal mines when the coal 
used in making the coke is moved from the mines to the coke ovens under freight 
tariff rates. 

4. (a) Private cars on private tracks when the ownership of the car 
and track is the same. 

Note. — Private cars while held under constructive placement for delivery upon the tracks of their 
owners are subject to demurrage charges after expiration of forty-eight hours' free time. (See Rules 
5 and 9.) 

DEFINITIONS 

Private Car. — A Private Car is a car having other than railroad owner- 
ship. A lease of a car is equivalent to ownership. Private cars must have 
the full name of the owner or lessee painted or stenciled thereon or must 
be boarded with wooden, metal or card boards showing the full name of 
owner or lessee, and, if card boarded, the card board must also show initials 
and number of car and date of shipment. If name of lessee is painted, 
stenciled or boarded on car, then the car is exempt from demurrage for the 
lessee only. If name of lessee is not painted, stenciled or boarded on car, 
then the car is exempt from demurrage for the owner only. 

A Private Track is a track outside of carrier's right-of-way, yard and 
terminals, and of which the carrier does not own either the rails, ties, road- 
bed or right-of-way ; or a track or a portion of a track which is devoted to 
the purpose of its user, either by lease or written agreement, in which case 
the lease or written agreement will be considered as equivalent to ownership. 

4. (b) Empty private cars stored on railroad or private tracks, includ- 
ing such cars sent by the owner to a shipper for loading, provided the cars 
have not been placed or tendered for loading on the orders of a shipper. 
(See Rule 6, Section D.) 

(153) 



154 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Rule 2 — Free Time Allowed 

Section A.— (1)— Forty-eight hours (two days) free time will be allowed 
for loading or unloading all commodities. (See Rule 2, Section B, Paragraph 

"LOADING" includes the furnishing of forwarding directions on outbound 
cars. (See Rule 6, Section C.) 
"UNLOADING" includes : 

(a) Surrender of bill of lading on shipments billed "to order." 

(b) Payment of lawful freight charges when required prior to delivery of 
the car. 

(c) Furnishing of a "turn-over" order (an order for delivery to another 
party) after car has been placed for delivery and no additional movement 
of the car is made. 

2. When the same car is both unloaded and reloaded, each transaction 
will be treated as independent of the other; except that, when loading is 
begun before unloading is completed, the free time for loading shall not 
begin to run until the first 7 a. m. after unloading is completed. This will also 
apply to industries performing their own switching service, in which case 
the industry must notify the carrier date and time car was unloaded. 

3. When a car held for loading or unloading is moved by railroad or 
private power to another point in the same yard or industry to complete 
loading or unloading, only forty-eight hours free time will be allowed, except 
that when the railroad makes a charge for such movement the time incident 
thereto shall not be computed against the car. 

(See Rule 7, Note 2.) 

Note. — If a consignee wishes his car held at any break-up yard or a hold yard before notification 
and placement, such car will be subject to demurrage. That is to say, the time held in the break-up 
yard will be included within the 48 hours of free time. If he wishes to exempt his car from this imposi- 
sition of demurrage he must either, by general orders given to the carrier or by specific orders as to in- 
coming freight, notify the carrier of the track upon which he wishes his freight placed, in which event 
he will have the full 48 hours' free time from the time when the placement is made upon the track 
designated. This " Note" will apply except when in conflict with Rule 2, Section B, Paragraph 1. 

Section B. — Twenty -four hours' (one day) free time will be allowed: 

1. When cars are held for reconsignment, diversion or reshipment, or 
held in transit on order of consignor, consignee or owner. 

Note 1. — This will apply to cars loaded with coal or coke, when moved from mines, mine siding 
or coke ovens upon instructions of mine owners, operators or shippers and held at weighing stations, 
classification yards or elsewhere, for forwarding directions. 

Note 2. — This will not apply to cars subject to Rule 2, Section B, Paragraph 3. 

The term" diversion" or "reconsignment" will be applied as defined in the reconsignment tarriffs 
of this railroad, except that under this rule when a car is placed for delivery at destination a "turn-over" 
(or order for delivery to another party) which does not involve a change in billing records nor an addi- 
tional movement of the car is not a reconsignment for the purpose of applying these demurrage rules. 
(See Rule 2, Section A.) 

A reshipment is the making of a new contract by which under a new rate 
the original lading, without being unloaded, is forwarded in the same car 
to another destination. 

2. When cars, destined for delivery to or for forwarding by a connecting 
line, are held under tariff regulations for surrender of bill of lading or pay- 
ment of lawful freight charges. 

3. When cars are held in transit and placed for inspection or grading, 
including reconsignment or other disposition orders. At stations where grain 
and hay must be inspected or graded, the consignee agreeing with the carrier 
in writing for file at the station, to accept the bulletining of the cars as 
due and adequate notice of arrival, the bulletins must be posted by 9:00 A. 
M. of each day, showing the previous twenty-four (24) hours' receipts, and 
the free time (twenty-four hours) is to be calculated from the first 7:00 A. 
M. thereafter. Where there is no agreement for bulleting of cars, the free 
time must be calculated from the first 7 :00 A. M. after the day on which 
notice of arrival is sent or given to the consignee. 

4. Except as otherwise provided in Rule 2, Section A, Paragraph 3, when 
cars are held to complete loading, or to partly unload. 

Note. — When a car held for unloading is partly unloaded and partly reloaded, 48 hours' free time 
will be allowed for the entire transaction. 



Freight Rates 155 

5. On cars containing freight in bond for Customs entry and Government 
inspection. (See Rule 8, Section F.) 

6. When cars are held in transit because of any condition solely attri- 
buted to consignor, consignee or owner, not otherwise specifically provided 
for in these rules. (See Rule 3, Section G.) 

Section C. — No free time will be allowed on cars received from switching 
line and held by this railroad for forwarding directions, except that cars 
received between 4 :00 P. M. and 7 :00 A. M. will not be subject to demurrage 
if forwarding directions are received prior to the following 12 noon. (See 
Exception below.) (See Rule 3, Section F.) 

Rule 3 — Computing Time 

Note. — In computing time, Sundays and legal holidays (National, State, and Municipal), but not 
half-holidays, will be excluded, except as otherwise provided in Section A of Rule 9. When a legal 
holiday falls on Sunday the following Monday will be excluded. 

Section A. — On cars held for loading, time will be computed from the first 
7:00 A. M. after placement on public delivery tracks and without notice of 
placement, but if not placed within 24 hours after 7 :00 A. M. of the day for 
which ordered, time will be computed from 7 :00 A. M. after the day on 
which notice of placement is sent or given to consignor. (See Rule 2, Section 
A, Paragraph 1, and Rule 6 — Oars for Loading.) 

Note 1. — Except as otherwise provided in Rule 2, Section C, and Rule 3, Section F, forwardinS 
directions for a car loaded out-bound, sent by the consignor by U. S. Mail to the agent of this rail- 
road at point of shipment, will release car at 7:00 A. M. of the date received, provided they are mailed 
prior to the date received, and provided, further, that the car is ready for forwarding at such 7:00 
A. M. 

Note 2. — On cars subject to Rule 2, Section B, Note 1, time will be computed from the first 7:00 
A. M. after their arrival at point where held, and without notice. 

Section B. — 1. On cars held for orders, surrender of bill of lading or 
payment of freight charges, whether such cars have been placed in position 
to unload or not, time will be computed from the first 7 :O0 A. M. after the 
day on which notice of arrival is sent or given to the consignee or party 
entitled to receive same. (See Rule 4 — Notification. ) 

Note. — The time between receipt of order and placement of car (not to include the time attributable 
to the act or neglect of consigner or consignee) will be deducted from the total detention of the car. 

2. Orders for disposition or reconsignment, when mailed, wired or other- 
wise transmitted by the reconsignor to agent of the carrier at point where 
cars are held, or to the agent of any carrier named in the bill of lading 
contract or participating in the transportation transaction, unless otherwise 
prvodied by tariff, will release cars at 7 :00 A. M. of the date such orders are 
received by any such agent, provided they are sent or given prior to the 
date received. 

Such orders mailed, wired or otherwise transmitted and received the same 
date, will release cars at the hour the orders are received by any such agent. 

Date of mailing to be determined by the postmark. 

Note. — When order releasing a car is sent to the railroad by U. S. mail and the order is not received 
by the addresse, the car shall be considered released as of the date the order should have been delivered, 
provided proof is furnished by the claimant that the order was deposited in the U. S. mail properly 
stamped and addressed on the date claimed. 

Section C. — 1. On cars held for unloading, except as otherwise provided 
in Section B, Paragraph 1, of this Rule, time will be computed from the 
first 7:00 A. M., after placement on public delivery tracks, and after the 
day on which notice of arrival is sent or given to consignee or party entitled 
to receive same. If car is not placed within 24 hours after notice of arrival 
has been sent or given, time will be computed from the first 7:00 A. M. after 
the day on which notice of placement has been sent or given to the con- 
signee or party entitled to receive same. (See Rule 4, Sections A and D.) 

Note. — On cars subject to Rule 4, Section D, time will be computed from first 7:00 A. M. following 
removal by consignee of any part of contents of the car. 

2. On cars subject to Rule 5, Section B, Paragraph 2, time will be com- 
puted from the first 7:00 A. M. after the day on which notice as required 
by Rule 5, Section B. Paragraph 1, is sent or given to the consignee or 
party entitled to receive same. 



156 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Section D. — On cars to be delivered on other than public delivery tracks, 
time will be computed from the first 7 :00 A. M. after actual or constructive 
placement on such tracks. Time computed from actual placement on cars 
placed at exactly 7 :0O A. M. will begin at the same time 7 :00 A. M. ; actual 
placement to be determined by the precise time the engine cuts loose. (See 
Rule 4, Section C, and Rules 5 and 6.) 

Note 1. — "Actual Placement" is made when a car is placed in an accessible position for loading o r 
unloading or at a point previously designated by the consignor or consignee. If such placing is pre" 
vented from any cause attributable to consignor or consignee and car is placed on the private or 
other-than-public-delivery track serving the consignor or consignee, it shall be considered construc- 
tively placed, without notice. 

Note 2. — Any railroad track or portion thereof assigned for individual use will be treated as "other- 
than-public-delivery track." 

Section E.. — On cars to be delivered on interchange tracks of industrial 
plants performing the switching service for themselves or other parties, time 
will be computed from the first 7 :00 A. M. after actual or constructive place- 
ment on such interchange tracks until return to the same or another inter- 
change track. Time computed from the actual placement on cars placed at 
exactly 7 :00 A. M. will begin at the same 7 :00 A. M. ; actual placement to 
be determined by the precise time the engine cuts loose. (See Rule 4, Section 
C, and Rules 5 and 6.) Cars returned loaded will not be recorded released 
until necessary billing instructions are furnished. 

Note. — Where two or more parties take delivery from the same interchange track, or where the 
railroad company uses the interchange track for other cars, or where the interchange track is not 
adjacent to the plant and the industry uses the railroad's tracks to reach same, a notice of placement 
shall be sent or given to the consignee and time will be computed from the first 7:00 A. M. thereafter. 

Section F. — On cars received from switching line and held by this railroad 
for forwarding directions, time will be computed, without notice, from the 
first 7:00 A. M. after received. (See Rule 2, Section C.) 

Section G. — On cars subject to Rule 2, Section B, Paragraph 6, time will 
be computed from the first 7 :00 A. M. after the day on which notice that 
the car has been stopped in transit and is being held, has been sent or 
given the consignor, consignee or party entitled to receive same. 

Rule 4 — Notification 

Section A. — Notice of arrival shall be sent or given consignee or party 
entitled to receive same by the railroad's agent in writing or, in lieu thereof, 
as otherwise agreed to in writing by the railroad and consignee, within 
twenty-four hours after arrival of car and billing at destination, such notice 
to contain car initials and number, point of shipment, contents and, if 
transferred in transit, the initial and number of original car. When address 
of consignee does not appear on billing, and is not known, the notice of 
arrival must be deposited in United States mail enclosed in a stamped envel- 
ope bearing return address, same to be preserved on file if returned. An im- 
pression copy shall be retained, and when notice is sent or given on a postal 
card the impression shall be of both sides. (See Rule 3, Sections B and C.) 
In case a car subject to Rule 3, Section C, Paragraph 1. is not placed on 
public delivery track within twenty-four hours after notice of arrival has 
been sent or given, notice of placement shall be sent or given to consignee. 

Note. — When owner requests that original point of shipment be omitted on reconsigned cars, this 
information shall not be shown on notice of arrival at destination. 

Section B. — When cars are ordered stopped in transit, notice shall be sent 
or given the party ordering the cars stopped upon arrival of cars at point 
of stoppage. 

Note. — This will not apply to cars billed to be stopped in transit for milling or other in-transit 
privilege. Notice shall be sent or given to the party designated to perform the milling other in- 
transit service. 

Section C. — Delivery of cars upon other than public delivery tracks or 
upon industrial interchange tracks, or written notice sent or given to con- 
signee or party entitled to receive same, of readiness to so deliver, will con- 
stitute notification to consignee. (See Rule 8, Section D, Paragraph 1 (b).) 

Section D. — In all capes where any part of the contents of a car has been 
removed by the consignee prior to the sending or giving of required notice, 
such removal shall be considered as notice of arrival. (See Rule 3, Section 
C, Paragraph 1.) 



Freight Rates 157 

Section E. — 1. When carload freight is refused at destination, notice of 
such refusal shall, within 24 hours thereafter, be sent by wire to consignor, 
when known, at his expense, or when not known, to agent at point of ship- 
ment, who shall be required promptly to notify the shipper if known. 

2. (a) When unclaimed perishable carload freight has not been disposed 
of within two days from the first 7:00 A. M. after the day on which notice 
of arrival has been sent or given to consignee, notice to that effect shall be 
sent by wire as provided in Paragraph 1 of this section. 

(b) When other carload freight is unclaimed within five days from the 
first 7:00 A. M. after the day on which notice of arrival has been sent or 
given to the consignee, a notice to that effect shall be sent by wire as pro- 
vided in Paragraph 1 of this section. 

(See Rule 8, Section D, Paragraph 4.) 

Rule 5 — Placing Cars For Unloading 

Note. — Under this rule the time of movement between hold point and destination, and any other 
time for which the railroad is responsible, will not be computed against the consignee. 

Section A. — 1. When delivery of a car consigned or ordered to an indust- 
rial interchange track or to other than a public delivery track cannot be 
made on account of the inability of the consignee to receive it, or because 
of any other condition attributable to the consignee, such car will be held at 
destination, or if it cannot reasonably be accommodated there, at the nearest 
available hold point, and written notice that the car is held and that the 
railroad is unable to deliver will be sent or given to the consignee. This will 
be considered constructive placement. (See Rule 3, Sections D and E.) 

2. On a car to be delivered to a switching line for final delivery and which 
consignee located on switching line is unable to receive and which for that 
reason the switching line is unable to receive from the railroad, notice will 
be sent or given the switching line showing point of shipment, car initials 
and numbers, contents and consignee and if transferred in transit the initials 
and number of the original car. 

3. When the railroad is the switching line and, under conditions set forth 
in Paragraph 1, is unable to receive cars from a connecting line at destina- 
tion for delivery within switching limits, upon receipt of notice from con- 
necting line it will notify the consignee and put such cars under constructive 
placement. (See Rule 4, Section C.) 

Section B. — 1. When delivery cannot be made on specifically designated 
public delivery tracks, on account of such tracks being fully occupied, or from 
other causes beyond the control of the railroad, notice shall be sent or 
given the consignee in writing or, in lieu thereof, as otherwise agreed to in 
writing, that delivery will be made at the nearest available point. Such 
delivery shall be made unless the consignee shall before delivery indicate 
a preferred available point, in which case the preferred delivery will be made. 

2. In the event consignee or party entitled to receive shipment serves 
notice upon the railroad of refusal to accept delivery at the point named in 
notice sent or given in accordance with Paragraph 1, the car will be held 
awaiting opportunity to deliver on the specially designated track subject to 
Rule 3, Section C, Paragraph 2. 

Rule 6 — Cars For Loading 

Section A. — Cars for loading will be considered placed when such cars are 
actually placed or held on orders of the consignor. In the latter case the 
agent must send or give the consignor written notice of all cars which he 
has been unable to place because of condition of the other-than-public-delivery 
track or because of other conditions attributable to the consignor. This will 
be considered constructive placement. (See Rule 3, Sections A, D and E.) 

Section B. — When empty cars placed on orders are not used in transporta- 
tion service, demurrage will be charged from actual or constructive place- 
ment until released, with no free time allowance. 

Note. — In the application of this section a demurrage day consists of a twenty-four period computed 
from the hour of actual or constructive placement of the car. (See Section D.) 



158 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Section C. — Private cars which have been loaded on the tracks of their 
owners, received from such tracks and held by the railroad for forwarding 
directions, are subject to demurrage charges from the first 7 :00 A. M. after 
they are received until proper forwarding directions are furnished, with no 
free time allowance and without notice. 

Section D. — If an empty car is appropriated without being ordered, it 
shall be considered as having been ordered and actually placed at the time 
so appropriated. If not loaded outbound, such car is subject to Section B 
of this Rule. 

Rule 7 — Demurrage Charges 

Section A. — On cars not subject to Rule 9 (Average Agreement) : After 
the expiration of free time allowed, the following charges per car per day, 
or fraction of a day will be made until car is released: (See Notes 1 and 2.) 

For each of the first four days, $2. 

For each succeeding day, $5. 

Section B. — The charges on cars subject to average agreement are set forth 
in Rule 9. (See Notes 1 and 2.) 

Note 1. — When through no fault of the consignor or consingee the lading of a car is transferred by 
a carrier into two or more cars, or when two small cars are furnished by a carrier in lieu of one large 
car ordered by the shipper, demurrage will be charged as for one car only, as long as any of such cars 
are detained beyond the free time. 

Note 2. — When a car contains two or more minimum carload shipments consigned to more than one 
consignee at the same station, demurrage will be charged the same as if the shipments had been re- 
ceived in separate cars and each consignee will be allowed a total free time of 48 hours (2 days) for 
unloading, free of interference by the other consignee or consignees. 

(See North Carolina Storage Rules and Charges for additional charges on 
cars loaded with inflammable freight and less dangerous or relatively safe 
explosives.) 

Rule 8 — Claims 

No demurrage charges shall be collected under these rules for detention 
of cars through causes named below, except as provided in Section B, Para- 
graph 2, of this rule. Demurrage charges assessed or collected under such 
conditions shall be promptly cancelled or refunded by the railroad. 

CAUSES 
Section A. — Weather Interference. 

Note. — A consignor or consignee shall not be absolved from demurrage under Section A of this 
Rule if, considering the character of the freight, others similarly situated and under the same condi- 
tions reasonably could and did load or unload cars during the same period of time. 

1. When the, condition of the weather during any part of the prescribed 
free time (or the adjusted free time provided for in Section B of this Rule) 
is such as to make it impossible for men or teams to work at loading or 
unloading, or impossible to place freight in cars, or move it from cars, with- 
out serious injury to the freight, or when, because of high water or snow- 
drifts (see note) it is impossible, during the prescribed free time, to get to 
the cars for loading or unloading, the free time will be extended until a total 
of forty-eight hours (or twenty-four hours on cars subject to Rule 2, Section 
B, Paragraph 4) free from such interference shall have been allowed. No 
additional time will be allowed unless claim, stating fully the conditions 
which prevented loading or unloading within the free time, is presented in 
writing to the railroad's agent within thirty days after the date on which 
demurrage bill is rendered. 

Note. — The extension of free time on account of high water or snow drifts shall apply to other* 
than-public-delivery tracks only where there is a disability of the railroad. 

2. When, at time of actual placement, lading is frozen so as to require 
heating, thawing or loosening to unload, the free time allowed shall be ex- 
tended forty-eight (48) hours, making a total of ninety-six (96) hours free 
time, provided the consignee shall, within forty -eight (48) hours after actual 
placement, serve upon the railroad's agent a written statement that the 
lading was in such frozen condition at time of actual placement. 



Freight Rates 159 

3. No allowance on account of weather interference shall he made on 
cars subject to Rule 6, Section B. 
Section B. — Bunching. 

1. Cars for loading. When, by reason of delay or irregularity in filling 
orders, cars are bunched and placed for loading in accumulated numbers in 
excess of daily placing as ordered, the shipper shall be allowed such free 
time for loading as he would have been entitled to had the cars been placed 
for loading as ordered. 

2. Cars for unloading or reconsigning. When, as the result of the act 
or neglect of any carrier, cars originating at the same point, moving via the 
same route and consigned to one consignee at one point, are bunched, or when 
cars originating at different points and transported via the same route from 
an intermediate common point to destination are bunched after arriving at 
the common point (in which event the dates of arrival of the cars at common 
point will govern in determining the bunching instead of the dates of ship- 
ment), and are tendered for delivery by this railroad in accumulated number 
in excess of daily shipments, the consignee shall be allowed such free time 
as he would have been entitled to had the cars not been bunched, but when 
any car is released before the expiration of such free time, the free time 
on the next car will be computed from the first 7 :00 A. M. following such 
release ; provided, however, no allowance will be made unless claim is pre- 
sented in writing to the railroad's agent within thirty days after the date 
on which bill for demurrage is rendered, supported by the receipted bill as 
evidence of payment of the demurrage as originally charged and a statement 
showing date and point of shipment of each car involved in the bunching claim. 

t Note. — Under this rule, cars moving from different points and /or via different routes to destina- 
tion and arriving on different dates will be considered bunched if tendered for delivery on one day 
and such free time shall be allowed as the consignee would have been entitled to had the cars been 
placed or tendered for delivery in the order of their arrival. 

Section C. — Demand of overcharge. When the railroad's agent demands the 
payment of transportation charges in excess of tariff authority. 
Section D. — Delayed or improper notice by the railroad. 

1. (a) When notice of arrival does not contain all the information speci- 
fied in Rule 4, Section A, consignee shall not have the right to call in question 
the sufficiency of such notice, unless within forty-eight (48) hours from the 
first 7:00 A. M. after the day on which notice of arrival has been sent or given 
to the consignee or party entitled to receive same, he shall serve upon the 
railroad's agent a written statement of the omitted information required, in 
which event the time between receipt of such statement and the furnishing 
of the omitted information will not be computed against the consignee. 

(b) When the consignee makes request in writing for the name of the con- 
signor, point of shipment and (or), if transferred in transit, the initials and 
number of the original car, to enable him to identify the shipment in a car 
placed or tendered for delivery on other than public delivery track, such 
information will be furnished, but consignee shall not be entitled to additional 
free time unless such request has been served on the railroad's agent within 
the prescribed free time, in which event the time between receipt of the 
request and compliance therewith will not be computed against the consignee. 
(See Rule 4, Section A, Note.) 

2. When claim is made that a mailed notice has been delayed, postmark 
thereon shall be accepted as indicating the date of the notice. 

3. When a notice of arrival (See Rule 4, Section A) is mailed by the rail- 
road on Sunday, a legal holiday, or after 3:00 P. M. on other days (as evi- 
denced by the postmark thereon), consignee shall be allowed five hours addi- 
tional free time provided he shall send or give to the railroad's agent, within 
the first twenty-four hours of free time, written advice that the notice had 
not been received until after the free time had begun to run ; in case of failure 
on the part of the consignee so to advise the railroad's agent, no additional 
free time shall be allowed. 

4. In case of failure by the railroad to send notice in accordance with the 
provisions of Rule 4, Section E, the consignor shall not be held liable for 
demurrage charges between the date the notice should have been sent and the 
date it was actually sent. 



160 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Section E. — Error of any railroad named in the bill of lading contract or 
participating in the transportation transaction, which prevents proper tender 
or delivery. 

1. Under this Rule demurage will he charged on the basis of the amount 
that would have accrued but for such error. This also applies in the case of 
constructviely placed cars being "run-around" by actually placing recent 
arrivals ahead of previous arrivals, but allowance will only be made on cars 
subject to Rule 9, Average Agreement, that are held beyond the fourth debit 
day. 

Note. — No allowance will be made for delay in placing nor for interruption in loading or unloading 
cars consigned or ordered to a track, other than a public delivery track, used by two or more shippers 
or consignees when such delay or interruption is attributable to such joint use of such track, except 
that due allowance will be made if a car displaced in switching is not replaced when the switching ia 
is completed. (See Rule 3, Section D, Note 2.) 

Section F. — Delay by U. S. Customs. Such additional free time shall be 
allowed as has been lost through such delay. 

Rule 9 — Average Agreement 

When the following agreement has been entered into, the charge for deten- 
tion of cars, on all cars subject to demurrage, held for loading or unloading, 
shall be computed on the basis of the average time of detention to all such 
cars released during each calendar month ; such average detention and charge 
to be computed as follows : 

Section A. — One credit will be allowed for each car, released within the 
first twenty-four (24) hours of free time. After the expiration of forty-eight 
(48) hours (96 hours on cars subject to Rule 8, Section A, Paragraph 2) free 
time, one debit per car per day, or fraction of a day, will be charged for each 
of the first four days. In no case shall more than one credit be allowed on 
any one car, and in no case shall more than four credits be applied in can- 
cellation of debits accruing on any one car. When a car has accrued four 
debits a charge of $5 per car per day, or fraction of a day, will be made for 
all subsequent detention and will apply on all subsequent Sundays and legal 
holidays, including a Sunday or holiday immediately following the day on 
which the fourth debit begins to run. 

Section B. — Credits earned on cars held for loading shall not be used in 
offsetting debits accruing on cars held for unloading, nor shall credits earned 
on cars held for unloading be used in offsetting debits accruing on cars held 
for loading. 

Section C. — Credits cannot be earned by private cars subject to Rule 1, 
Section B, Paragraph 4 (a), but debits charged on such private cars while 
under constructive placement may be offset by credits earned on other cars. 

Section D. — At the end of the calendar month, the total number of credits 
will be deducted from the total number of debits and $2 per debit will be 
charged for the remainder. If the credits equal or exceed the debits no 
charge will be made for the detention of the cars, except as otherwise pro- 
vided in Section A for detention beyond the fourth debit day, and no payment 
will be made by the railroad on account of such excess of credits ; nor shall 
the credits in excess of the debits of any one month be considered in com- 
puting the average detention for another month. 

Section E. — A party who enters into this average agreement shall not be 
entitled to include therein cars subject to Rule 2, Section B, or Rule 6, 
Sections B and C, nor shall he be entitled to cancellation or refund of de- 
murrage charges under Section A, Paragraph 1, Rule 8, nor under Section B 
of Rule 8, except where bunching has been caused by strike of carrier's 
employees, or where shipments of coal, withheld by the carrier by strike 
of carrier's employees, or where shipments of coal, withheld by the carrier 
to protect its fuel supply, are subsequently delivered to consignee in accu- 
mulated numbers. 

Section F. — A party who enters into this average agreement may be re- 
quired to give sufficient security to the railroad for the payment of balances 
against him at the end of each month. 



Freight Rates 161 

Section G. — An average agreement must include all cars loaded or unloaded 
within the jurisdiction of the same station, except that when desired 
separate agreements may be entered into for each plant or yard within the 
jurisdiction of the same station, but in no case can the cars loaded or un- 
loaded within the jurisdiction of two or more stations be combined in one 
average agreement, nor shall the cars loaded or unloaded by more than one 
consignor or consignee be combined in one average agreement, except that 
cars consigned, reconsigned, or ordered to a public elevator, warehouse or 
cotton compress serving various parties may be combined in one average 
agreement. 

AGREEMENT 
Railroad. 

Being fully acquainted with the terms, conditions, and effect of the average 

basis for settling for detention to cars as set forth in , being the car 

demurrage rules governing at all stations and siding on the lines of said 
railroad, except as shown in said tariff, and being desirious of availing (my- 
self or ourselves of this alternate method of settlement (I or we) do express- 
ly agree to and with the Railroad that with respect to all cars 

which may, during the continuance of this agreement, be handled for (my 

or our) account at (Station), (I or we) will fully observe 

and comply with all the terms and conditions of said rules as they are now 
published or may hereafter be lawfully modified by duly published tariffs, 
and will make prompt payment of all demurrage charges accruing thereunder 
in accordance with the average basis as therein established or as hereafter 
lawfully modified by duly published tariffs. 

This agreement to be effective on and after the day of , 

19 , and to continue until termination by written notice from either party 

to the other, which notice shall become effective on the first day of the 
month succeeding that in which it is given. 

Approved and accepted , 19 , by and on behalf of the 

above-named railroad by 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

Issued April 12, 1927. Clerk. 

Effective April 27, 1927. 

Circular No. 282 (Cancels Circular No. 236). 

STORAGE RULES AND CHARGES 

APPLYING ON 

INTRASTATE TRAFFIC AT ALL POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

INSTRUCTIONS 

Rule 1. — Freight Subject to Rules 

Freight, including equipment moving on its own wheels, as freight at tariff 
rate, as described in Rule 5, Section D, received for delivery or held to com- 
plete a shipment or for forwarding directions, if stored or held in or on the 
premises or tracks of the railroad, is subject to these storage rules, except 
as provided in Section D of this rule. 

Shipments of less-than-carload freight, loaded into or delivered direct from 
cars, are subject to storage rules, but when the loading or unloading is done 
by shipper or consignee, either as required by classifications or tariffs, or at 
request of shipper or consignee, the cars are subject to demurrage rules and 
storage rules do not apply. 

Note. — Freight which is not liable to damage from the elements and which is not ordinarily handled 
through freight houses may be stored free, unless otherwise provided, on the vacant land of the rail- 
road, pending shipment, and entirely at owner's risk, provided owner has previously been assigned 
space as far as available and without distinction. 

Section A. Freight upon which the free time allowed under demurrage 
rules has expired while in cars, and subsequently unloaded in or on railroad 
premises, is subject to these storage rules when unloaded, without free time 
allowance. 



162 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Section B. Carload shipments of explosives, or other dangerous articles, 
are subject to both demurrage and storage rules. (See Rule 6.) 

Section C. Carload freight, other than explosives or other dangerous 
articles, held in cars for delivery and subsequently unloaded in or on rail- 
road premises, is subject to demurrage rules while in cars and to these 
storage rules after it is unloaded. 

If unloaded or reloaded by the carrier, the actual cost of the service will 
be in addition to the storage charge. (See Rule 5, Section C.) 

Section D. Exception. The rules and charges herein will not apply on : 

1. Freight stored in warehouses owned and operated by railroads as ex- 
clusively storage warehouses. 

2. Export or import freight at the port of export or import. 

3. Domestic freight received from or intended for delivery to ocean or 
lake vessels at the port of transhipment. 

4. Freight subject to lighterage at seaboard points. 

5. Carload lots of Coal, Coke or Ore. 

Rule 2 — Notification 

Section A. Notice shall be sent or given consignee or party entitled to 
receive same by carrier's agent in writing, or as otherwise agreed to in 
writing by carrier and consignee, within twenty-four hours (one day) after 
arrival of shipment and billing at destination, such notice to specify point 
of shipment and commodity. 

An impression copy of written notice shall be retained. When notice is 
sent or given on a postal card, the impression shall be of both sides. 

When the address of the consignee does not appear on billing and is not 
known, notice of arrival must be deposited in the United States mail en- 
closed in a stamped envelope bearing return address, same to be preserved 
on file if returned. 

REFUSED OR UNCLAIMED FREIGHT 

Section B. 1. Where shipments have been plainly marked with the con- 
signor's name and address, preceded by the word "from," notice shall be im- 
mediately sent or given consignor or refusal of less-than-carload shipments. 
Unclaimed less-than-carload shipments will be treated as refused after fifteen 
calendar days from expiration of free time. 

2. Notice shall be sent or given the consignor of unclaimed or refused 
shipments of explosives or other dangerous articles on hand forty-eight 
hours, provided written request is received for this information by agent at 
point of origin at time of shipment. Such requests should be plainly-written 
on a rectangular piece of paper of different color from any label required 
under the Interstate Commerce Commission's regulations and placed on the 
package in close proximity to such label (or to name of consignee). 

3. Where consignor requests that notice of unclaimed or refused shipments 
be sent by telegraph, this may only be done at his expense. 

Rule 3 — Free Time Allowed 

Section A. I. Forty-eight hours' (two days) free time will be allowed 
on all commodities except the more dangerous explosives, as described in Rule 
6, Section A, for the removal of inbound freight from car or railrad premises, 
or to complete a carload shipment and furnish forwarding directions there- 
for. 

Exception. On less-than-carload shipments consigned to parties located 
at interior or at non-railroad points, the following allowance of free time 
will be made when hauled: 

10 miles and not over 20 miles from the station, 5 days. 

Over 20 miles and not over 30 miles from the station, 10 days. 

Over 30 miles from the station, 15 days. 

2. Outbound less-than-carload freight not accompanied by proper ship- 
ping directions which will permit forwarding on date received, will be sub- 
ject to storage charges from the first 7 A. M. after receipt of the shipment 
with no free time allowance. 



Freight Eates 163 

Section B. Twenty -four hours' (one day) free time will be allowed: 

1. On less-than-carload freight held to complete a shipment. 

2. On less-than-carload freight held for reshipment. 

3. On the more dangerous explosives (as described in Rule 6, Section A), 
for removal of inbound freight from car or railroad premises or to complete 
a carload shipment outbound and furnish forwarding directions therefor. 

Note. — Outbound less-than-carload shipments of the more dangerous explosives not accompanied 
by proper shipping directions which will permit forwarding on the date received, will not be accepted. 

4. On carload shipments of explosives and other dangerous articles, as 
described in Rule 6, reconsigned or reshipped in the same car received; or 
when such shipments, destined for delivery to or forwarding by a connecting 
line, are held under tariff regulations for surrender of bill of lading or pay- 
ment of lawful freight charges. 

Rule 4 — Computing Time 

Section A. In computing time any fractional part of 100 pounds will be 
computed as 100 pounds and any fractional part of twenty-four hours will 
be computed as one day. 

Section B. In computing time, Sundays and legal holidays (National, 
State and Municipal), but not half -holidays, will be excluded. When a legal 
holiday falls on a Sunday, the following Monday will be excluded. 

Section C. On inbound freight held for removal and on freight held for 
reconsignment or reshipment, time will be computed from the first 7:00 A. 
M. after the day on which notice of arrival is sent or given to consignee. 

Section D. On outbound freight, time will be computed from the first 7 :00 
A. M. after receipt in or on railroad premises. 

Section E. On outbound carloads of explosives and other dangerous articles 
(as described in Rule 6), time will be computed from the first 7:00 A. M. 
after loading is begun. 

Section F. When orders for freight held for disposition or reconsignment 
are mailed, such orders will release freight at 7 :00 A. M. of the date orders 
are received at the station where the freight is held, provided the orders are 
mailed prior to the date received, but orders mailed and received on the same 
date release freight the following 7:00 A. M. 

Rule 5 — Charges for Storage on Freight Other Than Explosives and 
Other Dangerous Articles 

Section A. Freight, except Automobiles or other self-propelling vehicles (but 
not excepting Motorcycles or bicycle motor wheels), held in or on railroad 
premises in excess of free time allowed, will be subject to the following 
storage charges per day, or at option of carrier may be sent to public ware- 
houses : 

For each of the first five days, iy 2 cents per 100 lbs. ; 

For the sixth and each succeeding day, 3 cents per 10O lbs.; 

Minimum storage charge per shipment on freight held beyond free time, 
five (5) days or part thereof, 25 cents; six (6) days or more, 50 cents. 

Section B. After expiration of free time, Automobiles or other self-pro- 
pelling vehicles (except motorcycles and bicycle motor wheels) will be sub- 
ject to a storage charge of three and one-half (3%) cents per 100 lbs. per day, 
with a minimum charge of $1.00 per machine per day for each of the first 
five (5) days, and $2.00 per machine for each succeeding day, or at option 
of carrier may be sent to public warehouses. 

Section C. (a) When carload freight is unloaded by the carrier for the 
purpose of releasing needed equipment, the storage charge will be the same 
as would have accrued under car Demurrage and Track Storage Rules had 
the freight remained in the car. (See Rule 1, Section C.) 

(b) When carload freight is unloaded in or on railroad premises by or 
upon request of consignee or consignor, the storage charges shall not exceed 
the amount that would have accrued under Demurrage and Track Storage 
Rules had the freight remained in the car. 

Section D. After the expiration of 48 hours' free time, derrick cars, pile 
driver cars, camp cars, road construction and asphalt outfits, and other 



164 N. C. Corporation Commission 

equipment not adapted to or customarily used for revenue freight loading and 
which ordinarily are not and cannot be unloaded, moving on own wheels at 
freight tariff rates, will be subject to a storage charge of one dollar ($1.00) 
per car, or other unit of equipment, per day, while held on tracks of the 
railroad. 

Rule 6 — Charges for Storage on Explosives and Other Dangerous Articles 

Extracts from Regulations prescribed by the Interstate Commerce 
Commission 

1. Paragraph 1433 * * * "consignee must remove such shipments from 
the carrier's property within 48 hours after notice of arrival at destination, 
Sundays and holidays not included." 

2. Paragraph 1643 (a) * * * "If a shipment of Explosives is not removed 
within 48 hours after notice of arrival at destination, it must be disposed of 
by return to the shipper, or by storage at the expense of the owner, or by 
sale, or when necessary to safety by destruction under supervision of a 
competent person." 

3. Paragraph 1714 "(a) * * * consignee must remove such shipments 
from the carrier's property within 48 hours after notice of arrival at destina- 
tion, Sundays and holidays not included." 

"(b) When removal of carload or less-carload shipments of dangerous 
articles other than explosives requiring 'INFLAMABLE' or 'ACID' placards, 
or red, yellow, green or white I. C. C. labels from carrier's premises has not 
been made within 48 hours after notice of arrival has been sent or given 
consignee (Sundays and holidays not included), shipments must be disposed 
of as follows : 

1. Carload shipments (a) by storage on carrier's property or (b) by 
storage on other than carrier's property if safe storage on carrier's premises 
is not available; or (c) by sale at expiration of thirty calendar days after 
notice of arrival has been sent or given consignee, provided consignor has 
been notified of non-delivery at expiration of 48-hour period and order for 
disposition have not been received. 

2. Less-carload shipments (a) by return to shipper if notice of non-delivery 
was requested and given consignor as prescribed by carrier's tariff, and 
orders for return to shipper have been received, or (b) by storage on carrier's 
property, or (c) by storage on other than carrier's property, if safe storage 
on carrier's property is not available, or (d) by sale at expiration of 30 
calendar days after notice of arrival has been sent or given to consignee, 
provided consignor has been notified of non-delivery at expiration of 48-hour 
period and orders for disposition have not been received." 

Storage will be charged at the following rates per day of twenty-four hours 
or fraction thereof, on Explosives or other dangerous articles, held in or on 
railroad premises, in excess of free time allowed : 

Section A. On shipments of the more dangerous explosives, i. e., Low 
Explosives, Black Powder, High Explosives, Wet Fulminate of Mercury, 
Blasting Caps, Electric Blasting Caps, Ammunition for Cannon with Explo- 
sive Projectiles, Explosive Projectiles, Explosive Torpedoes, Explosive Mines, 
Explosive Bombs and Detonating Fuzes; on less than carload shipments of 
such articles twenty-eight and one-half (28%) cents per 100 lbs., per day, 
with a minimum charge of fifty (50) cents per shipment. 

On shipments of such articles (described in Section A of this rule) held 
in cars for or by consignors or consignees, for loading, unloading, forwarding 
directions, or for any other purpose charge will be five dollars ($5.00) per 
car per day, in adition to the regular demurrage and track storage charges. 

Section B. On shipments of the less dangerous and relatively safe Ex- 
plosives, i. e., Ammunition for Cannon with Empty Projectiles, Ammunition 
for Cannon with Sand Loaded Projectiles, Ammunition for Cannon with Solid 
Projectiles, Ammunition for Cannon without Projectiles, Smokeless Powder for 
Cannon, Smokeless Powder for Small Arms, Common Fireworks, Special Fire- 
works, Small Arms Ammunition, Cannon Primers, Small Arms Primers, Empty 
Cartridge Bags — Black Powder Igniters, Empty Cartridge Shells, Primed, 
Combination Primers, Percussion Caps, Time, Tracer or Percussion Fuzes, 
Combination Fuzes, Safety Fuse, Instantaneous Fuse, Cordeau Detonant and 



Freight Kates 165 

Safety Squibs, or less-than-carload shipments of Dangerous Articles other 
than Explosives requiring Red, Yellow, Green or White I. C. C. labels, on 
less than carload shipments of such articles, twelve (12) cents per 100 pounds 
per day, with a minimum charge of twenty-five (25) cents per shipment. 

On shipments of the less dangerous and relatively safe explosives, which, 
under the I. C. C. Regulations require "INFLAMMABLE" placards, or which 
do not require placards, and on shipments of Dangerous Articles other than 
Explosives which, under I. C. C. Regulations, require "INFLAMMABLE" or 
"ACID" placards, held in cars for or by consignors or consignees, for loading, 
unloading, forwarding directions, or for any other purpose, charge will he 
two dollars ($2.00) per car per day in addition to the regular demurrage and 
track storage charges. 

Note. — The term "Railroad Premises," as used in this rule when applicable to carload shipments 
shall embrace all tracks which the railroad provides for its own uses and purposes; and also private 
tracks constructed, maintained or operated under a written agreement by which the railroad reserves 
the right to use the whole or any part of them for itself or others than the party with whom the agree- 
ment is executed. 

Section C. When shipments of the "more dangerous explosives" (see 
Section A) are not removed from the railway premises by the consignee 
within the legal limit (forty-eight hours (two days) after the first 7:00 A. 
M. following notice of arrival), the most practicable of the steps authorized 
by paragraph 1643 (a), as quoted above, must be taken to secure this removal. 

When available, Powder Magazines not on railway property should be 
utilized for storage. 

Rule 7 — Claims 

No storage charges shall be collected under these rules for delays from 
causes named below. Storage charges assessed or collected under such condi- 
tions shall be promptly cancelled or refunded by the carrier. 

CAUSES 
Section A. Weather Interference. 

Note. — A consignor or consignee shall not be absolved from storage under Section A of this rule 
if, considering the character of the freight, others similarly situated and under the same condition, 
reasonably could and did deliver or remove freight during the same period of time. 

1. When the condition of the weather, during the prescribed free time, 
is such as to make it impossible to complete delivery of outbound shipments 
or remove inbound freight from railroad premises without serious injury to 
the freight, the free time shall be extended until a total of forty-eight hours 
(24 hours on freight subject to Rule 3, Section B, paragraphs 1 and 3) free 
from such weather interference shall have been allowed. 

2. When, because of high water or snow drifts it is impossible to remove 
freight from railroad premises during the prescribed free time. (See Note 
above.) 

Section B. Demand of overcharge. 

When the carrier's agent demands the payment of transportation charges 
in excess of tariff authority. 

Section C. Delayed or Improper Notice. 

1. When notice of arrival does not contain all the information specified 
in Rule 2, Section A, the consignee shall not have the right to call in ques- 
tion the sufficiency of such notice unless within the prescribed free time 
he shall serve upon the railroad's agent a written request for the omitted 
information required, in which event the time between receipt of such re- 
quest and the furnishing of the omitted information will not be computed 
against the consignee. 

2. When claim is made that a mailed notice has been delayed, the post- 
mark thereon shall be accepted as indicating the date of the notice. 

3. When a notice is mailed by carrier on Sunday, a legal holiday, or 
after 3:00 P. M. on other days (as evidenced by the postmark thereon), the 
consignee shall be allowed five hours, additional free time, provided he shall 
mail or send to the carrier's agent, within the first twenty-four hours of free 
time, written advice that the notice had not been received until after the 



166 N. C. Corporation Commission 

free time had begun to run. In case of failure on part of consignee so to notify 
carrier's agent, no additional free time shall be allowed. 

4. In case of failure by carrier to send or give notice in accordance with 
the provisions of Rule 2, Section B, no storage charges will be assessed 
against the consignor between the date on which the notice should have been 
sent or given and the date on which it was actually sent or given. 

5. When an order giving disposition of a shipment is sent to the railroad 
by United States mail and the order is not received by the addressee, such 
order shall be considered received as of the date it should have been delivered, 
provided proof is furnished by the claimant that the order was deposited in 
the mail properly stamped and addressed on the date claimed. In such event, 
storage charges shall not be assessed against the shipment during the time 
the railroad was unable to make delivery by reason of non-receipt of the 
order. 

Section D. Error of any railroad which prevents proper tender or delivery. 

Under this rule storage will be charged on the basis of the amount that 
would have accrued but for such error. 

Section E. Delay by United States Customs. 

Such additional free time shall be allowed as has been lost through such 
delay. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

Issued December 15, 1922. Clerk. 

Effective January 1, 1923. 
Circular No. 237 (Cancels Circular No. 222). 

SWITCHING RATES, RULES AND REGULATIONS AT POINTS IN 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Rule 1 

Carriers must furnish cars for loading, and must also accept from each 
other cars loaded at warehouses or sidetracks of one carrier for delivery at 
sidetracks or warehouses of the other carriers within switching limits. 

Rule 2 — Switching Service 

Switching service, as referred to herein, is defined as a service performed 
to or from private or assigned siding within switching limits, preceding or 
following a transportation movement. 

Rule 3 — Free Switching 

Cars handled in switching service loaded will be entitled to one free switch 
movement empty, including delivery to any connecting line within switching 
limits, except as otherwise provided herein. 

Rule 4 — Minimum Weight for Switching Service 

(a) Cars will be placed on private or assigned siding at all stations within 
switching limits of carriers for the receipt or delivery of freight when in lots 
aggregating not less than the following quantities, viz. : 

Articles rated in Southern Classification No. 46 (Agent E. H. Dulaney's No. 
17, supplements thereto or reissues thereof) as Fifth Class or higher, and 

Leaf Tobacco 5,000 pounds 

Articles rated in Associated Railways and North Carolina Exception Sheets 
(Notes 4 and 91, I. C. C. No 4., Exception No. 1 to Southern Classification 
No. 46) (Agent E. H. Dulaney's No. 17, supplements thereto or reissues 
thereof) in Classes "K" to "P," except brick or ice, L .C. L., carload mini- 
mum as per classification, 

Brick or Ice, L. C. L 10,000 pounds 

All other freight 10,000 pounds 

Or 

(b) Freight without minimum when consisting or articles requiring 
special facilities for loading or unloading, when such facilities are not 
furnished : or 



Freight Rates 167 

Cotton without minimum when delivered to or received from compresses. 

Rule 5 — Excess Over Full Carload 

When a lot of freight is offered for shipment in one day on which carload 
rates are provided, in quantities exceeding the amount that can be loaded in 
one car, the surplus, loaded in a separate car, will be switching at the 
rates, rules and regulations shown herein. 

Rule 6 — Subsequent Switch Movement 

After delivery of carload freight has been accomplished either by placing 
on private or assigned sidings for delivery to consignee, or by storage, any 
subsequent movement will be subject to charges provided in Rule 9. 

Rule 7 — Interchange Switching Rates 

Carriers will switch carload traffic (as defined in Rule 4) between private 
or assigned sidings and the usual interchange tracks with connecting lines 
at such points, at the maximum rate of $2.25 per car. 

Rule 8 — Local Switching Movement 

A movement which begins and ends within switching limits and which is 
not incident to the forwarding or delivery of a shipment to or from a point 
without said limits and is not covered by these regulations, is a local switch- 
ing movement and will be treated as such. (See Rule 9.) 

Rule 9 — Local Switching Rates 

That is, switching of traffic which is loaded at one point in a town and is 
discharged at another point in the same town within switching limits, when 
the haul involved does not exceed a distance of three miles, and when the 
service performed applies only on traffic originating and moving wholly within 
the State of North Carolina. (After cars are placed the owner must load 
or unload, as the case may be, within 24 hours, otherwise the usual demurrage 
charges will apply.) 

(a) When such traffic originates at and is discharged at points on the 
rails of one and the same carrier, the switching charges will be as shown 
in Paragraph (e). 

(b) When such traffic originates at a point on the rails of one carrier 
and is discharged at a point on the rails of another carrier the switching 
charges will be as shown in Paragraph (f). 

(c) When such traffic originates at and is discharged at the same plant or 
industry on the rails of one and the same company, the switching charges 
will be as shown in Paragraph (d). 

Definition of Intra-Plant, Intra-Terminal and Inter-Terminal Switching 

Intra-Plant Sivitchings A switching movement from one track to another 
within the same plant or industry. 

Intra-Terminal Switchings A switching movement (other than Intra-Plant 
Switching) from one track to another of the same road within the switching 
limits of one station or industrial district. 

Inter-Terminal Switchings A switching movement from a track of one 
road to a track of another road when both tracks are within the switching 
limits of the same station or industrial switching district. 

Switching charges (Regardless of Weight or Contents) 

(d) Intra-Plant Switching $3.60 per car 

(e) Intra-Terminal Switching $5.85 per car 

(f ) Inter-Terminal Switching $5.85 per car 

By order of the Commission : R. O Sei^, 

Effective July 1, 1922. Clerk. 

Circular No. 261 (Cancels Circular No. 225). 



168 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Supplement No. 1 to Circular No. 261 
RATES, RULES AND REGULATIONS 

GOVERNING SWITCHING AT POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

Amends Rule 9. Changed to read as follows: 

Rule 9 — Local Switching Rates 

That is, switching of traffic which is loaded at one point in a town and is 
dicharged at another point in the same town within switching limits, when 
the haul involved does not exceed a distance of three miles, and when the 
service performed applies only on traffic originating and moving wholly with- 
in the State of North Carolina. 

(a) When such traffic originates at and is discharged at points on the 
rails of one and the same carrier, the switching charges will be as shown 
in Paragraph (e). 

(b) When such traffic originates at a point on the rails of one carrier 
and is discharged at a point on the rails of another carrier the switching 
charges will be as shown in Paragraph (f). 

(c) When such traffic originates at and is discharged at the same plant 
or industry on the rails of one and the same company, the switching charges 
will be as shown in Paragraph (d). 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

February 25, 1927. Clerk. 

Effective March 15, 1927. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES REQUIRED TO GIVE NOTICE OF NON- 
DELIVERY OF FRESH FISH SHIPMENTS 

All express companies operating in this State and which hold themselves 
out as carriers of fresh fish, shall give notice to the consignor of the failure 
or refusal of the consignee to receive such shipments when the same have 
remained on hand four hours during daylight after arriving at point of des- 
tination, said notice to be given by filing a telegram to that effect with a 
telegraph company doing a commercial business between points of origin and 
destination ; provided, that it shall not be necessary to give such notice 
unless the carrier is directed by the shipper so to do in writing or printing 
attached to the package. 

This shall not apply where there is no commercial telegraph office open 
for business at either initial or destination point at the expiration of the 
time fixed herein. 

Should the carrier sell such shipments on the order of the shipper in any 
manner not pointed out by law, it shall be entitled to a commission for such 
services of 10 per cent of the amount realized. 

The carrier shall not await answer to its said telegram to the shipper 
longer than two hours, after which time it shall act in reference to said 
shipments in accordance with its duty under the law. 

Should the said shipment perish or become damaged because of the 
carrier's observance of the requirements of this order, it shall not be liable in 
damages therefor, if not otherwise at fault. 

The carrier shall re-ice such shipments only when directed to do so by the 
shipper, and when it is practicable so to do ; and when shipments are re-iced, 
same shall be done at actual cost and at the expense of the shipper. 

The shipper shall pay the going and return charges on shipments which 
are returned under this order, together with the telegraph tolls. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Se:lf, 

April 5, 1923'. Clerk. \ 

Circular No. 248. 

Rule Governing Issuance of Bills of Lading 

The obligation lawfully rests upon the carrier's agent to refrain from 
executing a bill of lading which contains provisions that can not lawfully be 
complied with, or provisions which are contradictory and therefore impos- 



Freight Rates 169 

sible of execution. When, therefore, the rate and the route are both given by 
the shipper in the shipping instructions and the rate given does not apply via 
the route designated, it is the duty of the carrier's agent to ascertain from 
the shipper whether the rate or the route given in the shipping instructions 
shall be followed. The carrier will be held responsible for any damages which 
may result from the failure of its agent to follow this course. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

Effective July 1, 1927. Clerk. 

Circular No. 285. 

DISTANCE TABLE RULES 

On January 19, 1926, the Commission issued an order requiring the carriers 
to revise and file with the Commission, effective not later than June 15, 1926, 
distance tables showing distances between all points on each line, said 
distances to show actual miles, including fractions of mile. 

In complying with the order it was necessary for the carriers in some in- 
stances to have their lines remeasured, and as a result of the order a great 
many changes were made in distances, some of which were increases and 
others decreases. Some of thes changes were, no doubt, due to track revisions, 
changes in locations of stations, etc., since the old distances were of long 
standing. 

Inquiries are now reaching the Commission concerning these changes. 
Some of these are complaints about increases in rates as a result of increased 
distances, while others are in the form of claims for overcharges where 
distances have been decreased, alleging former distances were incorrect and, 
therefore, illegal. 

The Commission is of the opinion, and so rules, that it would be unreason- 
able to expect a general revision of this nature to occur without involving 
some changes in distances and consequently in rates. Therefore, it is 

Ordered, That distances as shown in carriers' distance tables, effective on 
date of shipment, must be strictly adhered to, with exceptions as shown in 
following note: 

Note, (a) Where it is clearly shown that published distance is erroneous 
due to typographical or printer's error, or other clerical mistake, the es- 
tablished correct distance shall be protected, and carriers will amend their 
distance tables as early as practicable after their attention is directed to 
the error. 

(b) Agent Cottrell's N. C. Joint Tariff was not amended to reflect the 
new distances until December 10, 1926 ; therefore, where there is a conflict 
between the distances shown in the Joint Tariff and those made on combina- 
tion by use of the revised local distance tables, via routes shown in Joint 
Tariff, the latter will govern. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

May 10, 1927. Clerk. 

Circular No. 283. 

CORPORATION COMMISSION vs. COMMON CARRIERS BY RAIL 
IN NORTH CAROLINA 

In order to clarify an apparent misconception on the part of the common 
carriers of the state as to the proper method for arriving at correct rates 
now applicable on certain commodities named in Agent Kelly's Freight 
Taric No. 228 I. C. C. U. S.-l when handled on combination rates over two or 
more lines within the state, it is 

Ordered, That the rules and arbitraries set out in Agent Kelly's Freight 
Tariff No. 228 I. C. C. U. S.-l for arriving at combination rates on the com- 
modities named in said Tariff shall, until further ordered, apply to intra- 
state Traffic in North Carolina. It is further 

Ordered, That the principles for arriving at combination rates as set out 
in the said tariff are to be applied in connection with legally established 
rates of the carriers in this state. When used in connection with statutory 
deductions, the provisions of the Kelly Tariff to be invoked before making 
statutory deductions. (See Note). It is further 



170 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Ordered, That these rules shall apply to rates made on combination between 
all common carriers by rail within the state. 

Note. — First deduct the arbitraries shown in Kelly's Tariff, then apply the statutory 
deductions, after which add back arbitraries as per Kelly's Tariff, but in no case shall 
combination rates so made be less than can be made by use of Joint line scale for short 
line distance between the same points. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

September 25, 1925. Clerk. 

Circular No. 276. (Cancels Circular No. 250.) 

GROUP DESIGNATION OF COMMON CARRIERS 

For convenience of the Commission in referring to the common carrriers. 
of the State, they are hereby grouped as follows : 

Group "A" 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. 
Carolina, Clinchfield & Ohio Railway Company. 
Carolina & Northwestern Railway Company. 

Norfolk & Western Railway Company (except Abingdon Branch). 
Seaboard Air Line Railway Company. 
Southern Railway Company. 
Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company. 

Group "B" 
Asheville & Craggy Mountain Railway . 
Asheville Southern Railway Company. 
Atlantic & Yadkin Railway Company, (A. E. Smith and J. W. Fry, 

Receivers ) . 
Carolina & Tennessee Southern Railway Company. 
High Point, Randleman, Asheboro & Southern Railroad Company. 
State University Railroad Company. 
Yadkin Railroad Company. 

Group "0" 
Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. 

Group "D" 
Aberdeen & Rockfish Railroad Company. 
Appalachian Railway Company. 
Atlantic & Carolina Railroad Company. 
Atlantic & Western Railroad Company. 
Black Mountain Railway Company. 
Bonlee & Western Railway Company. 
Carolina Railroad Company. 
Carolina and Georgia Railway Company. 
Carolina & Northeastern Railroad Company. 
Carolina-Southern Railway Company. 
Cliffside Railroad Company. 
Danville & Western Railway Company. 
Dover & Southbound Railroad Company. 
Durham & Southern Railway Company. 
East Carolina Railway. 
Elkin & Alleghany Railroad Company. 

East Tennessee & Western North Carolina Railroad Company. 
Graham County Railroad Company. 
High Point, Thomasville & Denton Railroad Company. 
Kinston-Carolina Railroad Company. 
Laurinburg & Southern Railroad Company. 
Lawndale Railway & Industrial Company. 
Linville River Railroad Company. 
Louisville & Nashville Railroad Company. 
Maxton, Alma & Southbound Railroad Company. 
Moore Central Railway Company. 
Norfolk & Western Railway Company (Abingdon Branch). 



Freight Rates 



171 



Piedmont & Northern Railway Company. 

Pigeon River Railway Company. 

Raleigh & Charleston Railroad Company. 

Rockingham Railroad Company. 

Tallulah Falls Railway Company (J. F. Gray, Receiver). 

Tennessee & North Carolina Railway Company. 

The Townsville Railroad Company. 

Tuckaseegee and Southeastern Railway Company. 

Virginia & Carolina Southern Railroad Company. 

Warrenton Railroad Company. 

Wilmington, Brunswick & Southern Railroad Company. 

On joint traffic between stations on the Southern Railway and stations on 
the lines in Group B, apply Southern Railway single line rates. 

On joint traffic between stations on the lines of Group B carriers ami 
stations on the lines if Group A, C, and D carriers, when the Southern Rail- 
way is a party to the movement, the mileage of Group B carriers must be 
treated as a part of the Southern Railway mileage. 

Circular No. 290 (Cancels Circulars No. 252 and 253). 



MAXIMUM CLASS RATES, SINGLE LINE 

APPLICABLE TO 



COMMON CARRIERS IN GROUPS A AND B ON INTRASTATE 
TRAFFIC BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

(See Circulars No. 252 and 253) 

Governed by Southern Classification No. 46 in connection with North 
Carolina Exception Sheet No. 6, supplements thereto and reissues thereof. 



RATES SHOWN IN CENTS 



Distance 


Per 100 Pounds 


Per 
Ton 


Per Carload. 




' 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


A 


B 


C* 


D* 


K 


L 


N 


O 


P 


5 miles and under 

10 miles and over 5 

1 5 miles and over 10 

20 miles and over 15 

25 miles and over 20. 

30 miles and over 25 

35 miles and over 30 

40 miles and over 35 

45 miles and over 40 

50 miles and over 45 

55 mileB and over 50 

60 miles and over 55 

65 miles and over 60 

70 miles and over 65 

75 miles and over 70 

80 miles and over 75 

85 miles and over 80 

90 miles and over 85. 

95 miles and over 90 

100 miles and over 95 


17 

21| 

25 

29| 

34 

m 

41 
44 

47 
49* 

51 

52 

53* 

55| 

56* 

58 
59 
61 
62 
63* 


14 
18* 
21* 
25 
28* 

33 

35* 
36* 
38* 
39* 

41 

42* 
44 
45 
47 

47* 

49* 

51 

52 

53* 


11* 
16 

18* 
22* 
25 

28* 

29* 

31 

33 

34 

35* 
36* 
38* 
39* 
41 

42* 
42* 
44 
44 
45 


10* 
13 
16 
18* 
20 

22* 
24* 
25 

27 

28* 

28* 
29* 
29* 
29* 
31 

31 
31 
31 
33 
34 


8* 
11* 
13 
14 
16 

17 
18* 
20 
20 
21* 

22* 

22* 
24* 
24* 
25 

25 

27 
27 
27 
28* 


7 

8* 
10* 
11* 
13 

14 
14 
16 

16 
17 

17 

18* 
18* 
20 
20 

21* 
21* 
21* 
22* 
22* 


6 

7 

8* 
10* 
11* 

11* 

13 

13 

14 
14 

16 
16 
17 
17 
17 

18* 
18* 
18* 
20 
20 


7 

8* 
10* 
11* 
13 

14 
16 
16 
17 
17 

18* 
18* 
20 
20 
21* 

21* 

22* 
22* 
22* 
24* 


7 

8* 
10* 
11* 
13 

14 
14 
14 
16 
16 

16 
16 
17 
17 
17 

18* 
18* 
18* 
18* 
20 


6 

7 

8* 
10* 
11* 

Hi 

13 
13 
13 
13 

14 
14 
14 
14 
14 

16 
16 
16 
16 
17 


4* 
6 
6* 

7 
8 

8* 
8* 
9 
9 
9 

10* 
10* 
10* 

11 

11 

11 

11* 

11* 

11* 

11* 


68 
90 
101 
101 
113 

124 
124 
135 
146 
146 

146 
146 
158 
158 
158 

158 
169 
169 
180 
180 


1300 
1400 
1600 
1700 
2000 

2250 
2450 
2500 
2700 
2850 

2950 
3100 
3300 
3400 
3550 

3650 
3850 
3950 
4100 
4100 


1050 
1150 
1300 
1400 
1600 

1600 
1700 
1700 
1850 
1850 

2000 
2000 
2150 
2150 
2250 

2250 
2450 
2450 
2500 
2500 


720 
900 
1100 
1150 
1350 

1500 
1600 
1700 
1700 
1700 

1850 
1850 
1850 
2000 
2000 

2000 
2150 
2150 
2150 
2250 



172 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

RATES SHOWN IN CENTS— Continued 



Distance 



Per 100 Pounds 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


B 


c* 


D* 


66| 


56| 


47 


354 


284 


224 


20 


244 


20 


17 


m 


59 


474 


354 


294 


244 


214 


25 


214 


184 


72 


62 


494 


364 


294 


244 


214 


25 


214 


184 


74| 


634 


51 


364 


31 


25 


224 


27 


224 


20 


78 


66i 


52 


384 


31 


25 


224 


27 


244 


20 


804 


67| 


554 


41 


34 


27 


224 


284 


244 


20 


83| 


694 


564 


424 


364 


284 


244 


284 


25 


214 


844 


70 


58 


44 


364 


284 


244 


294 


25 


214 


86 


72 


59 


45 


394 


294 


244 


294 


25 


214 


87| 


73| 


61 


47 


41 


31 


244 


294 


27 


224 


89 


74| 


62 


474 


41 


31 


244 


31 


27 


224 


90 


76 


634 


494 


424 


33 


25 


33 


284 


244 


90 


76 


634 


494 


424 


33 


25 


33 


284 


244 


92 


78 


634 


494 


424 


33 


27 


34 


29 


254 


92 


78 


634 


51 


424 


33 


27 


34 


29 


254 


92 


78 


634 


51 


424 


33 


284 


354 


31 


27 


92i 


79 


65 


51 


44 


33 


284 


354 


31 


27 


92| 


79 


65 


51 


44 


33 


284 


364 


33 


284 


94| 


804 


664 


52 


44 


34 


294 


364 


33 


284 


96 


814 


674 


534 


44 


34 


294 


364 


34 


294 


97 


834 


694 


554 


44 


34 


294 


364 


34 


294 


984 


834 


694 


554 


45 


34 


294 


384 


354 


31 


1004 


844 


70 


564 


47 


354 


31 


384 


354 


31 


101| 


86 


70 


564 


47 


354 


31 


384 


354 


31 


103 


874 


72 


58 


474 


364 


31 


384 


354 


31 


104 


8.74 


72 


58 


474 


364 


31 


384 


364 


33 


106 


89 


734 


58 


474 


364 


33 


394 


364 


33 


107 


89 


734 


59 


494 


384 


33 


394 


364 


33 


1084 


90 


744 


59 


494 


384 


34 


41 


384 


34 



Per 

Ton 



Per Carload 



N 


O 


4250 


2700 


4400 


2850 


4500 


2850 


4700 


2950 


4750 


2950 


4750 


3100 


4950 


3100 


4950 


3300 


5100 


3300 


5200 


3400 


5350 


3400 


5550 


3550 


5650 


3550 


5650 


3650 


5800 


3650 


5800 


3850 


5900 


3850 


5900 


3950 


6100 


4100 


6200 


4250 


6350 


4400 


6500 


4500 


6650 


4700 


6750 


4750 


7000 


4950 


7000 


5100 


7200 


5200 


7350 


5350 


7350 


5550 



110 miles and over 100. 
120 miles and over 110. 
130 miles and over 120. 
140 miles and over 130. 
150 miles and over 140 

160 miles and over 150. 
170 miles and over 160 
180 miles and over 170 
190 miles and over 180. 
200 miles and over 190. 

210 miles and over 200 
220 miles and over 210 
230 miles and over 220 
240 miles and over 230 
250 miles and over 240 

260 miles and over 250 
270 milts and over 260 
2£0 miles and over 270 
300 miles and over 280 
320 miles and over 300 

340 miles and over 320 
360 miles and over 340 
380 miles and over 360 
400 miles and over 380 
420 miles and over 400 

440 miles and over 420 
460 miles and over 440. 
480 miles and over 460 
500 miles and over 480. 



180 
180 
191 
191 
203 

203 
214 
214 
214 
214 

225 
225 
236 

236 



236 
248 
248 
259 
270 

293 
304 
315 
326 
349 

360 
371 
383 
383 



2250 
2450 
2450 
2500 
2700 

2700 
2850 
2850 
2950 
2950 

3100 
3100 
3300 
3300 
3300 

3400 
3400 
3400 
3500 
3650 

3850 
3950 
4100 
4250 
4400 

4500 
4700 
4750 
4950 



*Classes C and D, carload shipments, 20 per cent less than rates shown, including hay in straight 
or mixed carloads with grain or grain products other than flour. 



By order of the Commission : 
Effective March 10, 1924. 



R. O. Self, 
Clerk. 



Circular No. 254. 



Freight Rates 



173 



MAXIMUM CLASS RATES, JOINT LINE 

APPLICABLE TO 

COMMON CARRIERS IN GROUPS A AND B ON INTRASTATE TRAFFIC 
BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

(See Circulars No. 252 and 253) 

Governed by Southern Classification No. 46 in connection with North 
Carolina Exception Sheet No. 6, supplements thereto and reissues thereof. 

RATES SHOWN IN CENTS 



Distance 



5 miles and under 

10 miles and over 5... 
15 miles and over 10.. . 
20 miles and over 15... 
25 miles and over 20... 

30 miles and over 25... 

35 miles and over 30... 

40 miles and over 35... 

45 miles and over 40. .. 

50 miles and over 45... 

55 miles and over 50... 

60 miles and over 55... 

65 miles and over 60... 

70 miles and over 65... 

75 miles and over 70... 

80 miles and over 75... 

85 miles and over 80... 

90 miles and over 85.. . 

95 miles and over 90... 

100 miles and over 95... 

110 miles and over 100... 
120 miles and over 110... 
130 miles and over 120... 

140 miles and over 130 

150 miles and over 140... 

160 miles and over 150... 
170 miles and over 160... 
180 miles and over 170... 
190 miles and over 180... 
200 miles and over 190... 

210 miles and over 200... 
220 miles and over 210... 
230 miles and over 220... 
240 miles and over 230... 
250 miles and over 240... 



Per 100 Pounds 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


A 


B 


C* 


D* 


24| 


20 


16 


14 


11* 


10* 


8* 


10* 


10* 


8* 


28* 


24* 


20 


17 


14 


11* 


10* 


11* 


11* 


10* 


33 


27 


22* 


20 


16 


13 


11* 


13 


13 


11* 


36| 


31 


27 


22* 


17 


14 


13 


14 


14 


13 


41 


34 


29* 


24* 


18* 


16 


14 


16 


16 


14 


45 


38* 


33 


27 


20 


17 


14 


17 


17 


14 


m 


41 


34 


28* 


21* 


17 


16 


18* 


17 


16 


51 


42* 


35* 


29* 


22* 


18* 


16 


18* 


17 


16 


53| 


44 


36* 


31 


22* 


18* 


17 


20 


18* 


16 


56* 


45 


38* 


33 


24* 


20 


17 


20 


18* 


16 


58 


47 


39* 


33 


25 


20 


18* 


21* 


18* 


17 


59 


47* 


41 


34 


25 


21* 


18* 


21* 


18* 


17 


61 


49* 


42* 


34 


27 


21* 


20 


22* 


20 


17 


62 


51 


44 


34 


27 


22* 


20 


22* 


20 


17 


63* 


52 


45 


35* 


28* 


22* 


20 


24* 


20 


17 


65 


53* 


47 


35* 


28* 


24* 


21* 


24* 


21* 


18* 


66§ 


55* 


47 


35* 


29* 


24* 


21* 


25 


21* 


18* 


67* 


56* 


47* 


35* 


29* 


24* 


21* 


25 


21* 


18* 


69| 


58 


47* 


36* 


29* 


25 


22* 


25 


21* 


18* 


70 


59 


49* 


38* 


31 


25 


22* 


27 


22* 


20 


73| 


62 


51 


39* 


31 


25 


22* 


27 


22* 


20 


76 


65 


52 


39* 


33 


27 


24* 


28* 


24* 


21* 


79 


67* 


53* 


41 


33 


27 


24* 


28* 


24* 


21* 


81| 


69* 


55* 


41 


34 


28* 


25 


29* 


25 


22* 


84* 


72 


56* 


42* 


34 


28* 


25 


29* 


27 


22* 


87* 


73* 


59 


45 


36* 


29* 


25 


31 


27 


22* 


90 


74* 


61 


47 


39* 


31 


27 


31 


28* 


24* 


92 


76 


62 


47* 


39* 


31 


27 


33 


28* 


24* 


92* 


78 


63* 


49* 


42* 


33 


27 


33 


28* 


24* 


94 § 


79 


65 


51 


44 


34 


27 


33 


29* 


25 


96 


80* 


66* 


52 


44 


34 


27 


34 


29* 


25 


97 


81* 


67* 


53* 


45 


35* 


28* 


35* 


31 


27 


97 


81* 


67* 


53* 


45 


35* 


28* 


35* 


31 


27 


98* 


83* 


67* 


53* 


45 


35* 


29* 


36* 


33 


28* 


98* 


83* 


67* 


55* 


45 


35* 


29* 


36* 


33 


28* 



Per 
Ton 



101 
113 
124 
135 
141 

146 
158 
158 
169 
169 

180 
180 
180 
180 
191 

191 
203 
203 
203 
203 

214 
214 
214 
214 
225 

225 
236 
236 
248 
248 

259 
259 
259 
259 
270 



Per Carload 



N 


O 


1600 


1300 


1700 


1400 


2000 


1600 


2250 


1700 


2500 


1850 


2700 


1850 


2850 


2000 


2950 


2000 


3100 


2150 


3300 


2150 


3400 


2250 


3550 


2250 


3650 


2450 


3850 


2450 


3950 


2500 


4100 


2500 


4250 


2700 


4400 


2700 


4400 


2850 


4500 


2850 


4700 


2950 


4750 


3100 


4950 


3100 


5100 


3300 


5100 


3300 


5200 


3400 


5200 


3400 


5200 


3550 


5350 


3550 


5550 


3650 


5650 


3650 


5800 


3850 


5900 


3850 


5900 


3950 


6100 


3950 



1100 
1300 
1400 
1600 
1700 

1850 
2000 
2050 
2050 
2050 

2200 
2200 
2200 
2300 
2300 

2300 
2500 
2500 
2500 
2600 

2600 
2750 
2750 
2900 
3050 

3050 
3150 
3150 
3350 
3350 

3400 
3400 
3600 
3600 
3600 



174 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

RATES SHOWN IN CENTS— Continued 



Distance 


Per 100 Pounds 


Per 
Ton 


Per Carload 




» 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


A 


B 


C* 


D* 


K 


L 


N 


O 


P 


260 miles and over 250 

270 miles and over 260 

280 miles and over 270 

300 miles and over 280 

320 miles and over 300 

340 miles and over 320. 

360 miles and over 340 

380 miles and over 360 

400 miles and over 380 

420 miles and over 400. 

440 miles and over 420 

460 miles and over 440 

480 miles and over 460 

500 miles and over 480 


98| 
100| 
100| 
101* 
103 

104 
106 
107 
108| 
110 

nil 

112* 
114* 
115 


83| 

84| 
84* 
86 
87* 

89 
89 
90 
92 
92| 

92* 
94* 
94* 
96 


67| 
69* 
69* 
70 
72 

73* 
73* 
74* 
74* 
76 

76 

78 
78 
79 


55* 
55* 
55* 
56* 
58 

59 
59 
61 
61 
62 

62 
62 
63* 
63* 


45 
47 

47 
47 
47 

47 

47* 
49* 
49* 
51 

51 
51 

63* 
63* 


35* 
35* 
35* 
36* 
36* 

36* 
36* 
38* 
38* 
39* 

39* 
39* 
41 
41 


31 
31 
31 
33 
33 

33 
33 
34 
34 
34 

34 
35* 
35* 
36* 


38* 
38* 
39* 
39* 
39* 

39* 

41 

41 

41 

41 

41 
42* 
42* 
44 


34 
34 
35 
35 
36 

36 
37* 
37* 
37* 
37* 

38* 
38* 
38* 
39* 


29* 

29* 

31 

31 

33 

33 
34 
34 
34 
34 

35 

35 
35 
36 


18* 
18* 
19* 
20 
21* 

21* 
22* 
22* 
24* 
24* 

25 
25 
27 
27 


270 
270 
270 
293 
304 

315 
326 
349 
360 
371 

383 
405 
416 
416 


6100 
6200 
6200 
6350 
6500 

6650 
6750 
6950 
7000 
7250 

7350 
7350 
7600 
7600 


4100 
4100 
4250 
4400 
4500 

4700 
4750 
4950 
5100 
5200 

5350 
5550 
5650 
5800 


3750 
3750 
3750 
3850 
4000 

4200 
4300 
4450 
4550 
4750 

4850 
5000 
5150 
5300 



♦Classes C and D, carload shipments, 20 per cent less than rates shown, including hay in straight 
or mixed carloads with grain or grain products other than flour. 



By order of the Commission 
Effective March 10, 1924. 
Circular No. 255. 



R. O. Self, 
Clerk, 



FREIGHT RATES ON ARTICLES INCLUDED IN UNIFORM BRICK 

LIST 

AS SHOWN IN LIST (PAGE 175) 
IN CENTS PER 100 POUNDS 

Miles Single Line Joint Line 

10 miles and less 4 5 

20 miles and over 10 i l A 5}4 

30 miles and over 20 5 6 

40 miles and over 30 bY% 6}4 

50 miles and over 40 . 6 7 

60 miles and over 50 6% 7}4 

70 miles and over 60 7 8 

80 miles and over 70 7H 8 

Single or Joint Line 

90 miles and over 80 8 

100 miles and over 90 8 

120 miles and over 100__ 8J^ 

140 miles and over 120 9 

150 miles and over 140 9>£ 

160 miles and over 150. -- 9J^ 

180 miles and over 160. _. , 10 

200 miles and over 180. 10^ 

220 miles and over 200 11 

240 miles and over 220 11J4 



Freight Rates 175 

Single or Joint Line 

260 miles and over 240 12 

280 miles and over 260 123^ 

300 miles and over 280 13 

320 miles and over 300 13^ 

340 miles and over 320 14 

360 miles and over 340 14H 

380 miles and over 360 15 

400 miles and over 380 15Ji 

425 miles and over 400 16 

450 miles and over 425 16 ^ 

475 miles and over 450 -.. 17 

500 miles and over 475 17J^ 

525 miles and over 500 18 

550 miles and over 525 18J^ 

575 miles and over 550 19 

600 miles and over 575__ 193^ 

LIST OF ARTICLES INCLUDED IN THE UNIFORM BRICK LIST 
C. L. Minimum Weight 50,000 Pounds 

Rates apply on the following articles in straight or mixed carloads, made 
of (except as otherwise indicated) clay, concrete, gypsum, plaster or shale: 
Blocks, viz.: 

(Will not apply on Artificial Stone Blocks, Pieces or Slabs, in imitation of 
Natural Stone.) 

Building (Solid, Hollow or Perforated), except enameled. 

Condensing (including Condensing Rings). 

Facing (Solid, Hollow or Perforated), except enameled. 

Furnace. 

Paving, Shale or Fire Clay. 

Radial. 

Salt Glazed, when shipped in same manner as building or facing blocks. 

Segment. 

Silo. 
XBrick, viz. : 

Building (Solid, Hollow or Perforated), except enameled. 

Facing (Solid, Hollow or Perforated), except enameled. 

Fire, including Fire Brick made of Chrome, Corundite, Magnesite or Silica. 

Furnace. 

Paving, Shale or Fire Clay. 

Radial. 

Salt Glazed, when shipped in same manner as building or facing brick. 

Sand. 

Sand Cement. 

Sand Lime. 
Clay: 

Ground (Fire). 

Fire Clay, Ground Fire and Water combined. 
Conduits, not lined. 

Curling, Clay or Shale, Street (Vitrified). 
Shales 

Ground (Fire). 
Slabs (including Silo Slabs), Clay or Shale, not enameled, not roofing or 
ornamental, loaded loose in cars, when shipped in same manner as build- 
ing or facing brick. 

$On Brick, common, not hollow, made from low-grade clay or shale, when not 
braced, wedged or packed for protection against rubbing, breaking or clipping, not 
including any grades (firsts, seconds, thirds, or culls), of enameled, face, front, paving, 
nre or refractory brick, rates will be 80 per cent of the mileage scale shown herein. 



176 N. C. Corporation Commission 

* Tiles 

Fire-proofing. 

Hollow Building. 

Applicable to common carriers in Groups A, B, and C. (See Circulars Nos. 
252 and 253.) 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Raleigh, N. C. Clerk. 

Issued March 22, 1928. 

Effective April 2, 1928. 

Circular No. 287 (Cancels Circular No. 270). 

♦Rates named herein will not apply on heavy load bearing Concrete Tile, as carried 
in Corporation Commission Circular No. 262. 

CEMENT, HYDRAULIC, NATURAL OR PORTLAND, CARLOAD, MIN- 
IMUM WEIGHT 50,000 POUNDS, SUBJECT TO MARKED CAPACITY 
OF CAR, BUT NOT LESS THAN 40,000 POUNDS, IN CENTS PER 100 
POUNDS. 

Applicable for Both Single and Joint Hauls 

Distance Scale "A" Scale "B" Scale "C" 

5 miles and under 4 . 4.5 6 

10 miles and over 5 5 5.5 7 

15 miles and over 10 6 6.5 8 

20 miles and over 15 7 7.5 9 

30 miles and over 20 8 9 10 

40 miles and over 30 8.5 9.5 10.5 

50 miles and over 40 9 10 11 

60 miles and over 50 9.5 10.5 11.5 

70 miles and over 60 10 11 12 

80 miles and over 70 10.5 11.5 12 5 

90 miles and over 80 11 12 13 

100 miles and over 90 11.5 12.5 13.5 

120 miles and over 100 12 13 14 

140 miles and over 120 12.5 14 14.5 

160 miles and over 140 13 14.5 15 

180 miles and over 160 13.5 15 15.5 

200 miles and over 180 14 15 . 5 16 

220 miles and over 200 14.5 16 16.5 

240 miles and over 220 15 16.5 17 

260 miles and over 240 15.5 17 17.5 

280 miles and over 260 16 17.5 18 

300 miles and over 280 16.5 18 18.5 

320 miles and over 300 17 18.5 19 

340 miles and over 320 17.5 19.5 19.5 

360 miles and over 340 18 20 20 

380 miles and over 360 18.5 20.5 20.5 

400 miles and over 380 19 21 21 

420 miles and over 400 19.5 21.5 21.5 

440 miles and over 420 20 22 22 

460 miles and over 440 20.5 22.5 22.5 

480 miles and over 460 21 23 23 

500 miles and over 480 21.5 23.5 23.5 

520 miles and over 500 22 24 24 

540 miles and over 520 22.5 24.5 24.5 

560 miles and over 540 23 25 25 

580 miles and over 560 23.5 25.5 25.5 

600 miles and over 580. _ 24 26 26 






Freight Rates 177 

Scale "A" 
Applicable over lines of carriers in Groups "A" and "B" of Circular No. 
252, also over lines of Black Mountain Railway, East Carolina Railway, 
Piedmont & Northern Railway and the Virginia and Carolina Southern Rail- 
road. 

Scale "B" \ 

Applicable when all or part of the transportation is over lines of the 
Norfolk Southern Railroad. 

Scale "0" 

Applicable when all or part of the transportation is over lines of carriers 
not provided for in Scales "A" and "B". 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

Issued May 3, 1928. Clerk. 

Effective April 14, 1928. 

Circular No. 289 (Cancels Circular No. 266). 

Applicable to common carriers in Groups A, B, C, and D. (See Circulars, 
Nos. 252 and 253.) 

CEMENT RATES 

APPLICABLE TO 

COMMON CARRIERS IN GROUPS A, B, C, AND D OF CIRCULARS 

NOS. 252 AND 253, OR REISSUES ON INTRASTATE TRAFFIC 

BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

Descriptions Cement, Hydraulic, Natural or Portland, carload, minimum 
weight 50,000' pounds, subject to marked capacity of car, but not less than 
40,000 pounds. 

Change: The original circular should be corrected to provide for the 
removal of the East Carolina Railway from list of carriers taking Scale 
"A" rates and the placing of this carrier among those taking Scale "C" rate. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

Issued July 9, 1928. Clerk. 

In accordance with supplemental order of the Commission, dated May 28, 
1928. 

Supplement No. 1, Circular No. 289. 



178 



1ST. C. Corporation Commission 



FREIGHT RATES ON COAL AND COKE 

The freight rate on coal and coke in cents, per ton of 2,000 pounds, carload 
minimum 30,000 pounds, will be as follows : 



Distance 


Rate 


Distance 


Rate 




$ .79 
1.02 
1.02 
1.13 
1.13 
1.24 
1.24 
1.35 
1.47 
1.58 
1.58 
1.58 
1.58 
1.58 
1.69 
1.69 
1.69 
1.69 
1.80 
1.80 
1.80 
1.80 
1.92 
1.92 




$ 1.92 






1 92 






2.03 






2.03 






2.03 




200 miles and over 190 


2.14 




210 miles and over 200 


2.14 




220 miles and over 210 .__ 


2.14 




230 miles and over 220 


2.25 




240 miles and over 230 


2.25 






2.25 




260 miles and over 250 


2.25 




270 miles and over 260 


2.37 




280 miles and over 270 


2.37 




290 miles and over 280 . _-. 


2.37 




300 miles and over 290 


2.48 




310 miles and over 300 


2.48 




320 miles and over 310_ _ 


2.48 




330 miles and over 320. _ 


2.59 




340 miles and over 330 


2.59 






2.70 






2.70 




370 miles and over 360__ _._ 


2.82 




380 miles and over 370 


2.82 









Applicable for single line haul to all common carriers of the State except 
where other specific rates are approved by the Commission. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

July 1, 1922. Clerk. 

Circular No. 230 (Cancels Circular No. 216). 

CLAY GRAVEL (UNWASHED), C. L., MINIMUM WEIGHT MARKED 
CAPACITY OF CAR, EXCEPT WHERE CARS ARE LOADED TO 
FULL VISIBLE CAPACITY, IN WHICH CASE ACTUAL WEIGHT 
WILL BE CHARGED FOR, IN CENTS PER TON, 2,000 LBS. 

(Applicable only for the purpose of building public roads or highways in 
which the State, towns or counties, are interested.) 



Miles 


Single Line 


Miles 


Single Line 




57 
68 
79 
90 
102 




113 




220 miles and over 160 


124 




280 miles and over 220 _ ._. 


135 




350 miles and over 280. _ 


147 






158 









By order of the Commission : 

March 1, 1927. 

Circular No. 281 (Current Rates) 



R. O. 



Self, 
Clerh. 



Cancels Circular No. 193. 



Freight Rates 179 

COTTON, IN BALES, ANY QUANTITY, IN CENTS PER 100 POUNDS 







Rate 


Rate 




Rate 


Rate 


Distance 




Single 


Joint 


Distance 


Single 


Joint 






Line 


Haul 




Line 


Haul 


5 miles and under 


15 




160 miles and over 150 


55 


61 


10 miles and over 


5 


17 


24 


170 miles and over 160 


57 


62 


15 miles and over 


10 


19 


26 


180 miles and over 170 


58 


63 


20 miles and over 


15 


21 


28 


190 miles and over 180 


59 


64 


25 miles and over 


20 


23 


30 


200 miles and over 190 


60 


65 


30 miles and over 


25 


25 


32 


210 miles and over 200 


61 


66 


35 miles and over 


30 


27 


34 


220 miles and over 210 


62 


67 


40 miles and over 


35. 


29 


36 


230 miles and over 220 


64 


69 


45 miles and over 


40 


31 


38 


240 miles and over 230 


64 


69 


50 miles and over 


45 


33 


40 


250 miles and over 240 


66 


71 


55 miles and over 


50 


34 


41 


260 miles and over 250 


66 


71 


60 miles and over 


55. 


35 


42 


270 miles and over 260. 


68 


72 


65 miles and over 


60 


36 


42 


280 miles and over 270 


68 


72 


70 miles and over 


65 


37 


43 


300 miles and over 290 


69 


73 


75 miles and over 


70 


38 


44 


320 miles and over 310 


70 


74 


80 miles and over 


75 


39 


45 


340 miles and over 330 


71 


75 


85 miles and over 


80 


40 


46 


360 miles and over 350 


72 


76 


90 miles and over 


85. 


41 


47 


370 miles and over 360 


73 


76 


95 miles and over 


90 


42 


48 


380 miles and over 370 ... 


73 


76 


100 miles and over 


95 


43 


49 


400 miles and over 380 


74 


77 


110 miles and over 


100 


45 


51 


420 miles and over 400 


75 


78 


120 miles and over 


110 


47 


53 


440 miles and over 420 


76 


79 


130 miles and over 


120 


49 


55 


460 miles and over 440 


77 


80 


140 miles and over 


130 


51 


57 


480 miles and over 460 


78 


80 


150 miles and over 


140 


53 


59 


500 miles and over 480 


79 


81 



Rates applicable to all common carriers by rail within the State. (See 
Circulars Nos. 252 and 253.) 

In applying this scale of rates from point of origin within North Carolina 
to destinations within the State, rates so made shall in no case exceed rates 
from or to more distant interstate points, from or to which there are 
through published commodity rates and from or to which the intrastate 
origin or destination is directly intermediate and the movement is over a 
through route. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

July 15, 1926. Clerk. 

Circular No. 278. Cancels Circular No. 235. (Effective September 1, 1926.) 
Cancelled by Circular No. 280. 



180 N. C. Corporation Commission 

COTTON, IN BALES, ANY QUANTITY, IN CENTS PER 100 POUNDS 







Rate 


Rate 




Rate 


Rate 


Distance 




Single 


Joint 


Distance 


Single 


Joint 






Line 


Haul 




Line 


Haul 


5 miles and under 


15 




160 miles and over 150 


55 


61 


10 miles and over 


5 


17 


24 


170 miles and over 160 


57 


62 


15 miles and over 


10 


19 


26 


180 miles and over 170. _ 


58 


63 


20 miles and over 


15 


21 


28 


190 miles and over 180 


59 


64 


25 miles and over 


20 


23 


30 


200 miles and over 190 


60 


65 


30 miles and over 


25 


25 


32 


210 miles and over 200 


61 


66 


35 miles and over 


30 


27 


34 


220 miles and over 210 


62 


67 


40 miles and over 


36 


29 


36 


230 miles and over 220 


64 


69 


45 miles and over 


40 


31 


38 


240 miles and over 230 


64 


69 


50 miles and over 


45 


33 


40 


250 miles and over 240 


66 


71 


55 miles and over 


50 


34 


41 


260 miles and over 250 


66 


71 


60 miles and over 


55 


35 


42 


270 miles and over 260 


68 


72 


65 miles and over 


60 


36 


42 


280 miles and over 270 


68 


72 


70 miles and over 


65 


37 


43 


300 miles and over 280 


69 


73 


75 miles and over 


70 


38 


44 


320 miles and over 300 


70 


74 


80 miles and over 


75 


39 


45 


340 miles and over 320 


71 


75 


85 miles and over 


80 


40 


46 


360 miles and over 340 


72 


76 


90 miles and over 


85 


41 


47 


370 miles and over 360 


73 


76 


95 miles and over 


90 


42 


48 


380 miles and over 370 


73 


76 


100 miles and over 


95 


43 


49 


400 miles and over 380 


74 


77 


110 miles and over 


100 


45 


51 


420 miles and over 400 


75 


78 


120 miles and over 


110 


47 


53 


440 miles and over 420 


76 


79 


130 miles and over 


120 


49 


55 


460 miles and over 440 


77 


80 


140 miles and over 


130 


51 


57 


480 miles and over 460 


78 


80 


150 miles and over 


140 


53 


59 


500 miles and over 480 


79 


81 



Rates applicable to all common carriers by rail within the State. (See 
Circulars Nos. 252 and 253.) 

In applying this scale of rates from point of origin within North Carolina 
to destinations within the State, rates so made shall in no case exceed rates 
from or to more distant interstate points, from or to which there are 
through published commodity rates and from or to which the intrastate 
origin or destination is directly intermediate and the movement is over a 
through route. 



By order of the Commission : 
Effective December 15, 1926. 
Circular No. 280 (Cancels Circular No. 



R. O. Self, 

Clerk. 



278). 



Freight Rates 



181 



KATES ON COTTON SEED AND COTTON SEED HULLS, CARLOAD, 
20,000 POUNDS MINIMUM, (SEE NOTE) IN CENTS PER TON 
2,000 POUNDS. 







Rate 


Rate 




Rate 


Rate 


Distance 




Single 


Joint 


Distance 


Single 


Joint 






Line 


Haul 




Line 


Haul 


7 miles and under 


90 


125 


180 miles and over 170 


203 


238 


12 miles and over 


7 


102 


137 


190 miles and over 180 


214 


249 


17 miles and over 


12 


113 


148 


200 miles and over 190 


214 


249 


22 miles and over 


17 


113 


148 


210 miles and over 200 


214 


249 


27 miles and over 


22 


124 


159 


220 miles and over 210 


214 


249 


32 miles and over 


27 


124 


159 


230 miles and over 220 


225 


260 


37 miles and over 


32 


135 


170 


240 miles and over 230. 


225 


260 


42 miles and over 


37 


135 


170 


250 miles and over 240 


237 


272 


47 miles and over 


42 


147 


182 


260 miles and over 250.. 


237 


272 


52 miles and over 


47 


147 


182 


270 miles and over 260 


237 


272 


57 miles and over 


52 


147 


182 


280 miles and over 270 


237 


272 


62 miles and over 


57 


158 


193 


290 miles and over 280 


248 


283 


67 miles and over 


62 


158 


193 


300 miles and over 290 


248 


283 


72 miles and over 


67 


158 


193 


310 miles and over 300 


259 


294 


77 miles and over 


72 


158 


193 


320 miles and over 310 


259 


294 


82 miles and over 


77 


158 


193 


330 miles and over 320 ... 


259 


294 


87 miles and over 


82 


169 


204 


340 miles and over 330 


259 


294 


92 miles and over 


87 


169 


204 


350 miles and over 340 


270 


305 


97 miles and over 


92 


180 


215 


360 miles and over 350 


270 


305 


100 miles and over 


97 


180 


215 


370 miles and over 360_ 


270 


305 


110 miles and over 


100 


180 


215 


380 miles and over 370 


270 


305 


120 miles and over 


110 


180 


215 


390 miles and over 380 


282 


317 


130 miles and over 


120 


192 


227 


400 miles and over 390 


282 


317 


140 miles and over 


130 


192 


227 


420 miles and over 400 


293 


328 


150 miles and over 


140 


203 


238 


440 miles and over 420 


293 


328 


160 miles and over 


150 


203 


238 


480 miles and over 440 


304 


339 


170 miles and over 


160 


203 


238 


500 miles and over 480 


315 


350 



Applicable to common carriers in Groups A, B and C. 
152 and 253.) 



(See Circulars Nos. 



By order of the Commission : 

December 19, 1924. 

Circular No. 267 (Cancels Circular No. 258). 



R. O. Self, 

Clerk. 



182 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



LIME, OTHER THAN SPENT, IN BAGS, BARRELS OR IN BULK, C. 
L., MINIMUM WEIGHT 24,000 LBS., EXCESS IN PROPORTION, IN 
CENTS PER 100 LBS. 







Rate 


Rate 




Rate 


Rate 


Distance 




Single 


Joint 


Distance 


Single 


Joint 






Line 


Line 




Line 


Line 


5 miles and under 


4^ 


6 


170 miles and over 150 


HH 


12 H 


10 miles and over 


5 


6 


7 


190 miles and over 170 _ 


11 Vi 


13 


15 miles and over 


10 


ey 2 


7 


210 miles and over 190 


12 y 2 


13 H 


20 miles and over 


15 


7 


8 


230 miles and over 210 


13 


14 


25 miles and over 


20 


7 


8M 


250 miles and over 230 


13 M 


15 


35 miles and over 


25 


8 


9 


270 miles and over 250 


14 


15 


50 miles and over 


35 


8V 2 


9V 2 


280 miles and over 270 


15 


15^ 


65 miles and over 


50 


9 


9^2 


300 miles and over 280 


15 


16 


80 miles and over 


65 


9H 


io H 


340 miles and over 300 


16 


17 


100 miles and over 


80 


9V2 


n 


380 miles and over 340 


17 


18 


120 miles and over 


100 


10 K 


llH 


420 miles and over 380 _ 


18 


19 y 2 


150 miles and over 


120 


11 


11H 


460 miles and over 420 


19 y 2 


20 



Applicable to all common carriers of the State having over seventy-five 
miles of rail within the State, except where other specific rates are approved 
by the Commission. 



By order of the Commission : 

August 26, 1925. 

Circular No. 275 (Cancels Circular No. 242). 

Effective September 10, 1925. 

Cancelled by Circular 288. 



R. O. Self, 
Clerk. 



Freight Rates 183 

LIME AS PER DESCRIPTIONS BELOW 

Description "A" 
Lime, common, hydrated, quick or slack, in bulk, or in packages, as 
provided for carload shipments in Southern Classification, carload minimum 
weight 30,000 pounds. ( See Note below. ) 

Description "B" 

Lime, common, hydrated, quick or slack, in bulk or in sacks, carload, 
minimum weight 50,000 pounds. (See Note below.) 

Note. — When the carload charge computed on the higher rate at actual weight (but 
not less than the minimum weight specified for the higher rate) exceeds the charge 
computed on the lower rate at actual weight (but not less than minimum weight speci- 
fied for the lower rate) the latter charge will apply. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

Issued March 29, 1928. Clerk. 

Effective May 1, 1928. 
Circular No. 288 (Cancels Circular No. 275). 

Table "A" 
This table will apply over lines of carriers shown in Groups A, B, and O 
of Circulars Nos. 252 and 253, also over lines of other carriers which main- 
tain, either voluntarily or on order of the Interstate Commerce Commission, 
like rates on interstate traffic. 



184 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



Rates are in Cents Per ton 2,000 Pounds 

Description "A" Description "B" 

Rates (cents) Rates (cents) 

Minimum 30,000 pounds Minimum 50,000 pounds 

Distances Single Joint Single Joint 

5 miles and under _ 70 80 56 64 

10 miles and over 5 90 100 72 80 

15 miles and over 10 100 110 80 88 

20 miles and over 15 110 120 88 96 

25 miles and over 20 120 130 96 104 

30 miles and over 25 130 140 104 112 

35 miles and over 30 140 150 112 120 

40 miles and over 35 150 160 120 128 

45 miles and over 40 160 170 128 136 

50 miles and over 45 170 180 136 144 

55 miles and over 50 180 190 144 152 

60 miles and over 55 1 190 200 152 160 

65 miles and over 60 200 210 160 168 

70 miles and over 65 210 220 168 176 

80 miles and over 70 220 220 176 176 

90 miles and over 80 230 230 184 184 

100 miles and over 90 240 240 192 192 

120 miles and over 100 250 250 200 200 

140 miles and over 120 260 260 208 208 

160 miles and over 140 270 270 216 216 

180 miles and over 160 280 280 224 224 

200 miles and over 180 290 290 232 232 

220 miles and over 200 300 300 240 240 

240 miles and over 220 310 310 248 248 

260 miles and over 240 320 320 256 256 

280 miles and over 260 330 330 264 264 

320 miles and over 280 340 340 272 272 

360 miles and over 320 350 350 280 280 

400 miles and over 360 360 360 288 288 

440 miles and over 400 370 370 296 296 

480 miles and over 440 380 380 304 304 

520 miles and over 480 390 390 312 312 

560 miles and over 520 400 400 320 320 

600 miles and over 560 410 410 328 328 

Table "B" 
When the transportation is in whole or in part over either of the so-called 

short or weak lines, that is carriers not provided for in Table "A", rates 
will be determined as follows : Apply the rates applicable under appropriate 

scale or scales set forth above plus an arbitrary of 60 cents per ton under 
Description "A" and an arbitrary of 48 cents per ton under Description "B". 
Such arbitrary will accrue solely to the short line. 



LIVE STOCK RATES 

APPLICABLE TO 

COMMON CARRIERS IN GROUPS A, B, AND C ON INTRASTATE 
TRAFFIC BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

Governed by Southern Classification No. 46 in connection with North 
Carolina Exception Sheet No. 6, supplements thereto and reissues thereof. 



Freight Rates 



185 



DISTANCE 



5 miles and under 

10 miles and over 5. 

15 miles and over 10. 

20 miles and over 15 

25 miles and over 20- 

30 miles and over 25. 

35 miles and over 30. 

40 miles and over 35. 

50 miles and over 40. 



60 miles and over 
70 miles and over 
80 miles and over 
90 miles and over 
100 miles and over 



110 miles and over 100. 
120 miles and over 110. 
130 miles and over 120. 
140 miles and over 130. 
150 miles and over 140. 

160 miles and over 150. 
170 miles and over 160- 
180 miles and over 170. 
190 miles and over 180. 
200 miles and over 190. 

210 miles and over 200. 
220 miles and over 210. 
230 miles and over 220. 
240 miles and over 230. 
250 miles and over 240. 

275 miles and over 250. 
290 miles and over 275. 
300 miles and over 290. 
325 miles and over 300. 
350 miles and over 325. 

375 miles and over 350. 
400 miles and over 375. 
425 miles and over 400. 
450 miles and over 425. 
480 miles and over 450. 
500 miles and over 480. 



IN CENTS PER 100 POUNDS 



1° 

O Q 



oSnIz; 



3 "m a 
* .9 9 



Q o 



E a 2 



S - o 
Q E O 



m O 



O P 



►3d 



Single 
Line 



17 
18 
19 

20 
21 
22 
23 
24 

25 

25H 

26 

27 
27H 

28 
29 
30 
31 
32 

33^ 

35 

35 

36^ 

38 

39K 

41 

42K 

44 

45 

46 



Joint 


Single 


Joint 


Single 


Joint 


Single 


Joint 


Line 


Line 


Line 


Line 


Line 


Line 


Line 


11 


8.05 


11.05 


8.75 


11 75 


7 


11 


11 


8.05 


11.05 


8.75 


11.75 


7 


11 


11 


9.2 


12.2 


10 


13. 


8 


11 


12 


10.35 


13.35 


11.25 


14.25 


9 


12 


13 


11.5 


14.5 


12.5 


15.5 


10 


13 


14 


12.65 


15.65 


13.75 


16.75 


11 


14 


15 


13.8 


16.8 


15 


18 


12 


15 


16 


14.95 


17.95 


16.25 


19 25 


13 


16 


17 


16.1 


19.1 


17.5 


20.5 


14 


17 


1-8 


17.25 


20.25 


18.75 


21.75 


15 


18 


19 


18.4 


21.4 


20 


23 


16 


19 


20 


19.55 


22.55 


21.25 


24.25 


17 


20 


21 


20.7 


23.7 


22.5 


25.5 


18 


21 


22 


21.85 


24.85 


23.75 


26.75 


19 


22 


23 


23 


26 


25 


28 


20 


23 


24 


24.15 


27.15 


26.25 


29.25 


21 


24 


25 


25.3 


28.3 


27.5 


30.5 


22 


25 


26 


26.45 


29.45 


28.75 


31.75 


23 


26 


27 


27.6 


30.6 


30 


33 


24 


27 


28 


28.75 


31.75 


31.25 


34.25 


25 


28 


28J/ 2 


29.33 


32.33 


31.88 


34.88 


25^ 


28K 


29 


29.9 


32.9 


32.5 


35.5 


26 


29 


30 


31 


34.5 


33.75 


36.75 


27 


30 


30 


31.6 


34.5 


34.38 


36.88 


27i/ 2 


30 


30 


32.2 


34.5 


35 


37 


28 


30 


31 


33.35 


35.35 


36.25 


38.25 


29 


31 


32 


34.5 


36.5 


37.5 


39.5 


30 


32 


33 


35.65 


37.65 


38.75 


40.75 


31 


33 


34 


36.8 


38.8 


40 


42 


32 


34 


35^ 


38.5 


40.5 


41.88 


43.88 


33J^ 


35^ 


37 


40.25 


42.25 


43.75 


45.75 


35 


37 


37 


40.25 


42.25 


43.75 


45.75 


35 


37 


38H 


41.98 


43.98 


45.63 


47.63 


36M 


38^ 


40 


43.7 


45.7 


47.5 


49.5 


38 


40 


40^ 


45.42 


46.42 


49.38 


50.38 


39^ 


40M 


42 


47.15 


48.12 


51.25 


52.25 


41 


42 


433^ 


48.88 


49.88 


53.13 


54.13 


421/2 


43^ 


45 


50.6 


51.6 


55 


56 


44 


45 


46 


51.75 


52.75 


56.25 


57.25 


45 


46 


47 


52.9 


53.9 


57.5 


58.5 


46 


47 



.3 8-3 

— a <& 

Ji £ m 

fao 23 i> 

.9 p a 
o m a 

:-2a 

9 8 o 



<*» S S3 

El a". 

•3 -s J JJ 

W C '50 '" 
CQ 3 g g 



■He 2 



or cq „ a 

? ill 

J s .2 » 

1111 

s'i § £ 
J «§ ™ is 

«a rt o a 
w S p, u 



§.1 



Single 
Line 



11 

12K 
14 
15 
16 

17 
18 
19 
20^ 

22 

23K 

25 

26H 

28 

29 
30 
31 
32 
33 

34 
35 

35^ 
36H 
37 

38 

39 

39K 

40K 

41 

42H 

44 

44 

45 

46 

47 
48 
49 
50 
52 
523^ 



Joint 
Line 



Note.— Horses and Mules, C. L. minimum weight: 
23,000 lbs. per standard car 36 feet, 7 inches and under in length. 24,500 lbs. per standard car 36 feet, 7 inches 
to and including 38 feet, 6 inches in length. 25.780 lbs per standard car over 38 feet, 6 inches to and including 
40 feet, 6 inches in length. 26,910 lbs. per standard car over 40 feet, 6 inches in length. 

Circular 264. 



186 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



LOGS, ROUGH, CL., PER CAR 40,000 POUNDS, EXCESS IN PROPOR- 
TION, IN CENTS. 





Rate 


Rate 




Rate 


Rate 


. Distance 


Single 


Joint 


Distance 


Single 


Joint 




Line 


Line 




Line 


Line 


10 miles 


*720 


*1,300 


210 miles and over 200. _ .__ 


3,300 


3,85a 


20 miles. 


*855 
*1,050 
*1,150 
*1,300 


*1,400 
*1,600 
*1,700 
*1,850 


220 miles and over 210 

230 miles and over 220 

240 miles and over 230 

250 miles and over 240- .. 


3,300 
3,400 
3,400 
3,550 


3,850 


30 miles.. 


3,950 


40 miles 


3,950 


50 miles._ 


4,100 


60 miles 


*1,400 
*1,600 
*1,700 
*1,850 
*2,000 
2,150 


*2,000 
*2,150 
*2,250 
*2,450 
*2,500 
2,700 


260 miles and over 250 

270 miles and over 260 

280 miles and over 270 

300 miles and over 280 

320 miles and over 300 

340 miles and over 320 


3,550 
3,650 
3,650 
3,850 
3,850 
3,950 


4 , 100 


70 miles 


4,250 


80 miles 


4 , 250 




4,400 


100 miles 


4,450 


110 miles and over 100 


4,500 


120 miles and over 110 


2,250 


2,850 


360 miles and over 340 


4,000 


4,550 


130 miles and over 120 


2,450 


2,950 


380 miles and over 360 


4,100 


4,700 


140 miles and over 130 


2,500 


3,100 


400 miles and over 380 


4,250 


4,750 


150 miles and over 140 


2,700 


3,300 


420 miles and over 400 


4,300 


4,850 


160 miles and over 150 


2,850 


3,400 


440 miles and over 420 


4,400 


4,950 


170 miles and over 160 


2,950 


3,550 


460 miles and over 440 


4,450 


5,000 


180 miles and over 170 


2,950 


3,550 


480 miles and over 460 


4,500 


5,100 


190 miles and over 180 


3,100 


3,650 


500 miles and over 480 


4,550 


5,150 


200 miles and over 190 


3,100 


3,650 









♦When rates are not shown for the exact distance, the charge shall not exceed the rate for the nearest 
distance. In case where the haul is equidistant the charge shall be that for the next higher distance. 

Applicable to all common carriers of the State having over seventy-five 
miles of rail within the State except where other specific rates are approved 
by the Commission. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

August 5, 1923. Clerk. 

Circular No. 251 (Cancels Circular No. 246). 



Freight Rates 



187 



EATES ON ROUGH LOGS, C. L., VIZ: DOGWOOD, HICKORY, PERSIM- 
MON, GUMWOOD, ROUGH OAK, POPLAR, PINE, MAPLE, BIRCH, 
AND OTHER HARDWOOD LOGS, PER CARLOAD OF 40,000 LBS., 
IN CENTS PER CAR. EXCESS IN PROPORTION. 



Distance 


Rate 




900 




1,050 




1,100 




1,150 




1,300 


€0 miles and over 50 


1,400 


70 miles and over 60 


1,600 




1,700 







Applicable to all common carriers having less than 75 miles of line within 
the State, except where other rates on logs have been specifically approved 
by the Commission. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

June 30, 1925. Clerk. 

Circular No. 274 (Cancels Circular No. 273). 



188 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



MOLASSES IN BARRELS OR HOGSHEADS, IN CENTS PER 100 

POUNDS 



Distance 



Rate 


Rate 


Single 


Joint 


Line 


Haul 


6 


7 


7 


sy 2 


8 


9 


sy 2 


10 l A 


9 


11 


io y 2 


ny 2 


n 


ny 2 


UK 


13 


uy 2 


13 H 


13 


14 


13 


14 


14 


16 


14 


16 


16 


17 


16 


17 


17 


is y 2 


17 


isy 2 


18 H 


20 


18 X 


20 


20 


21H 


2iy 2 


22 y 2 


22 y 2 


2414 


24K 


25 


25 


27 


25 


27 



Distance 



Rate 
Single 
Line 



Rate 
Joint 
Haul 



5 miles 

10 miles 

15 miles 

20 miles 

25 miles 

30 miles 

35 miles 

40 miles 

45 miles 

50 miles 

55 miles 

60 miles 

65 miles 

70 miles 

75 miles 

80 miles 

85 miles 

90 miles 

95 miles 

100 miles 

110 miles 

120 miles 

130 miles 

140 miles 

150 miles 



and under 

and over 5. 
and over 10. 
and over 15. 
and over 20. 
and over 25. 
and over 30- 
and over 35. 
and over 40. 
and over 45. 
and over 50. 
and over 55. 
and over 60 
and over 65 
and over 70 
and over 75 
and over 80 
and over 85 
and over 90 
and over 95 
and over 100 
and over 110 
and over 120 
and over 130 
and over 140 



160 m 
170 m 
180 m 
190 m 
200 m 
210 m 
220 m 
230 mi 
240 m 
250 m 
260 m 
270 m 
280 m 
300 m 
320 m 
340 m 
360 m 
380 m 
400 m 
420 m 
440 m 
460 m 
480 m 
500 m 



and over 150. 
and over 160. 
and over 170. 
and over 180. 
and over 190. 
and over 200. 
and over 210. 
and over 220. 
and over 230. 
and over 240. 
and over 250. 
and over 260. 
and over 270. 
and over 280. 
and over 300. 
and over 220. 
and over 340 
and over 360 
and over 380 
and over 400 
and over 420 
and over 440 
and over 460 
and over 480 



27 
27 
28 H 

28 y 2 

28 y 2 

29 y 2 
29 y 2 
29 y 2 

31 
31 
31 
31 
33 
33 
33 
34 
34 
34 

35 y 2 

35 3^ 

35 y 2 

35 y 2 

36 y 2 



2%y 2 
2sy 2 
29 y 2 
29 y 2 

29 H 

31 

31 

31 

33 

33 

33 

33 

34 

34 

34 

35J4 

35 y 2 

35 y 2 

36 y 2 
36 y 2 
ssy 2 
36 y 2 

38 H 

38 y 2 



Applicable to common carriers in Groups A and B (See Circulars No. 252 
and 253). 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

February 10, 1924. Clerk. 

Circular No. 257. (Current rates). 



Freight Rates 



189 



PETROLEUM OIL AND ITS PRODUCTS, C. L., RATED 5TH CLASS IN 
SOUTHERN CLASSIFICATION, IN CENTS PER 100 POUNDS 







Rate 


Rate 




Rate 


Rate 


Distance 




Single 


Joint 


Distance 


Single 


Joint 






Line 


Haul 




Line 


Haul 


5 miles and under 


sy 2 


11H 


160 miles and over 150 


26 y 2 


29 


10 miles and over 


5 


ny* 


14 


170 miles and over 160 


27 y 2 


29 y 2 


15 miles and over 


10 


13 


15 y 2 


180 miles and over 170. 


27 y 2 


29 y 2 


20 miles and over 


15 


14 


16 


190 miles and over 180 


29 


31 


25 miles and over 


20 


15 H 


17 H 


200 miles and over 190 


29^ 


32 


30 miles and over 


25 


16 


is y 2 


210 miles and over 200 


29 y 2 


32 


35 miles and over 


30 


16 


isy 2 


220 miles and over 210 


31 


MM 


40 miles and over 


35 


17 H 


20 


230 miles and over 220 


31 


33^ 


45 miles and over 


40 


17 y 2 


20 


240 miles and over 230 


31 


33 y 2 


50 miles and over 


45 


is y 2 


20 y 2 


250 miles and over 240 


31 


33 y 2 


55 miles and over 


50 


isy 2 


2oy 2 


260 miles and over 250 


31 


MM 


60 miles and over 


55. 


20 


22 


270 miles and over 260 


31 


33 y 2 


65 miles and over 


60 


20 


22 


280 miles and over 270 


31 


MM 


70 miles and over 


65_ 


20 y 2 


23 


300 miles and over 280 


32 


34 


75 miles and over 


70 


20 y 2 


23 


320 miles and over 300 


32 


34 


80 miles and over 


75 


22 


24 y 2 


340 miles and over 320 


32 


34 


85 miles and over 


80 


22 


24 H 


360 miles and over 340 


32 


34 


90 miles and over 


85 


22 


2iy 2 


380 miles and over 360 


33 y 2 


35 m 


95 miles and over 


90 


23 


25 


400 miles and over 380 


33 y 2 


35 y 2 


100 miles and over 


95 


23 


25 


420 miles and over 400 


3i 


36 y 2 


110 miles and over 


100 


23 


25 


440 miles and over 420 


34 


36 y 2 


120 miles and over 


110 


24 y 2 


26 y 2 


460 miles and over 440 


34 


36 y 2 


130 miles and over 


120 


24 y 2 


26 y 2 


480 miles and over 460 


35 


38 


140 miles and over 


130 


25 


27 y 2 


500 miles and over 480 


35 


38 


150 miles and over 


140 


25 


27 y 2 









Applicable to common carriers in Groups A and B (See Circulars No. 252 
and 253). 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

February 10, 1924. Clerk. 

Circular No. 256. (Current rates). 



190 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



FREIGHT RATES ON TILE, CONCRETE BUILDING, WITHOUT ORNA- 
MENTAL FACE, CARLOAD MINIMUM, FIFTY THOUSAND POUNDS 
(APPLIES ONLY TO HEAVY-LOAD-BEARING CONCRETE TILE.) 
IN CENTS PER 100 POUNDS 



Miles 


Rate 
Single 
Line 


Rate 
Joint 
Line 




3.5 
4.0 
4.5 
5.0 
5.5 

6.0 
6.0 
6.5 


4.5 




10 




5.0 




20 




5.5 




30 




5.5 




40 




6.0 




50.__ 




6.5 




60 




6.5 




70 




7.0 











Single or Joint Line 

90 miles and over 80 _. _ _ 7.0 

100 miles and over 90 7.0 

120 miles and over 100_ _ 7.5 

140 miles and over 120 7.5 

150 miles and over 140 8.0 

160 miles and over 150 _. 8.0 

180 miles and over 160_._ _ 8.5 

200 miles and over 180 9.0 

220 miles and over 200 __ _ 9.5 

240 miles and over 220 . _. 9.5 

260 miles and over 240 _ _ _ 10.0 

280 miles and over 260 .. 10.5 

300 miles and over 280 _ 11.0 

320 miles and over 300 ... _ 11.5 

340 miles and over 320... 11.5 

360 miles and over 340 12.0 

380 miles and over 360. 12.5 

400 miles and over 380 13.0 

425 miles and over 400 _ 13. 5 

450 miles and over 425_ 13.5 



Applicable to lines named in Groups A, B, and O (See Circulars Nos. 252 
and 253). 

By order of the Commission: 

February 25, 1925. 

Circular No. 271 (Cancels Circular No. 262). 

Effective March 25, 1925. 



R. O. Self, 



Freight Rates 



191 



STONE, MARBLE, GRANITE, VIZ.: CURBING OR PAVING BLOCKS; 
BUILDING: DIMENSION OR RANDOM; ROUGH QUARRIED OR 
DRESSED; NOT POLISHED OR CARVED. CARLOAD MINIMUM 
50,000 POUNDS. PER TON 2,000 POUNDS 







Rate 


Rate 




Rate 


Rate 


Miles 




Single 


Joint 


Miles 


Single 


Joint 






Line 


Haul 




Line 


Haul 


5 miles and under 


80 


100 


160 miles and over 150.. 


162 


177 


10 miles and over 


5 


87 


107 


170 miles and over 160 


164 


179 


15 miles and over 


10 


90 


110 


180 miles and over 170 


166 


181 


20 miles and over 


15 


93 


113 


190 miles and over 180 


168 


183 


25 miles and over 


20. 


96 


116 


200 miles and over 190 


170 


185 


30 miles and over 


25.„ 


100 


120 


210 miles and over 200 


172 


185 


35 miles and over 


30 


103 


123 


220 miles and over 210 


174 


185 


40 miles and over 


35. 


106 


126 


230 miles and over 220 


176 


186 


45 miles and over 


50 


110 


130 


240 miles and over 230 


178 


188 


50 miles and over 


45. 


113 


130 


250 miles and over 240 


180 


190 


55 miles and over 


50 


116 


136 


260 miles and over 250 


182 


192 


60 miles and over 


55 


119 


139 


270 miles and over 260 


184 


194 


65 miles and over 


60.. 


123 


143 


280 miles and over 270. 


186 


196 


70 miles and over 


65 


126 


146 


290 miles and over 280 


189 


198 


75 miles and over 


70 


129 


149 


300 miles and over 290 


190 


200 


80 miles and over 


75. 


132 


152 


310 miles and over 300 


192 


202 


85 miles and over 


80 


135 


155 


320 miles and over 310 


194 


204 


90 miles and over 


85 


139 


159 


330 miles and over 320 


196 


206 


95 miles and over 


90 


142 


162 


340 miles and over 330 


199 


208 


100 miles and over 


95 


145 


165 


350 miles and over 340 


200 


210 


110 miles and over 


100 


148 


165 


360 miles and over 350 


202 


212 


120 miles and over 


110 


151 


166 


370 miles and over 360 


204 


214 


130 miles and over 


120 


154 


169 


380 miles and over 370 


206 


216 


140 miles and over 


130. 


157 


172 


390 miles and over 380 


209 


218 


150 miles and over 


140 


160 


175 


400 miles and over 390.. 


210 


220 



Applicable to lines named in Groups A, B, and C, 
also Montgomery Lumber Company Railroad. 
By order of the Commission : 
June 12, 1924. 
Circular No. 260. 
Effective July 1, 1924. 



(See Circular No. 253) 



R. O. 



Self, 
Clerk. 



192 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



RATES ON MARBLE, GRANITE AND STONE (CRUSHED OR 
RUBBLE), STONE SCREENINGS, GRAVEL (WASHED), SLAG, 
CHERT, AND SAND, IN STRAIGHT OR MIXED CARLOADS, CAR- 
LOAD MINIMUM WEIGHT 90 PER CENT OF MARKED CAPACITY 
OF CAR, EXCEPT WHEN CARS ARE LOADED TO THEIR VISIBLE 
CAPACITY THE ACTUAL WEIGHT WILL GOVERN, PER TON OF 
2,000 POUNDS 







Rate 


Rate 




Rate 


Rate 


Distance 




Single 


Joint 


Distance 


Single 


Joint 






Line 


Haul 




Line 


Haul 


5 miles and under 


50 


70 


190 miles and over 180 _ 


138 


153 


10 miles and over 


5 


57 


77 


200 miles and over 190 _. 


140 


155 


15 miles and over 


10 


60 


80 


210 miles and over 200 


142 


155 


20 miles and over 


15 


63 


83 


220 miles and over 210 


144 


155 


25 miles and over 


20 


66 


86 


230 miles and over 220.. 


146 


156 


30 miles and over 


25 


70 


90 


240 miles and over 230 _. 


148 


158 


35 miles and over 


30 


73 


93 


250 miles and over 240 


150 


160 


40 miles and over 


35 


76 


96 


260 miles and over 250 


152 


162 


45 miles and over 


40 


80 


100 


270 miles and over 260. _ 


154 


164 


50 miles and over 


45 


83 


103 


280 miles and over 270 


156 


166 


55 miles and over 


50 


86 


106 


290 miles and over 280 


158 


168 


60 miles and over 


55 


89 


109 


300 miles and over 290 


160 


170 


65 miles and over 


60 


93 


113 


310 miles and over 300 


162 


172 


70 miles and over 


65 


96 


•116 


320 miles and over 310 


164 


174 


75 miles and over 


70 


99 


119 


330 miles and over 320 


166 


176 


80 miles and over 


75 


102 


122 


340 miles and over 330 


168 


178 


85 miles and over 


80 


105 


125 


350 miles and over 340. 


170 


180 


90 miles and over 


85 


109 


129 


360 miles and over 350 


172 


182 


95 miles and over 


90 


112 


132 


370 miles and over 360 


174 


184 


100 miles and over 


95 


115 


135 


380 miles and over 370 


176 


186 


110 miles and over 


100 


118 


135 


390 miles and over 380 


178 


188 


120 miles and over 


110 


121 


136 


400 miles and over 390 


180 


190 


130 miles and over 


120 


124 


139 


410 miles and over 400 


182 


192 


140 miles and over 


130 


127 


142 


420 miles and over 410 


184 


194 


150 miles and over 


140 


130 


145 


430 miles and over 420 


186 


196 


160 miles and over 


150 


132 


147 


440 miles and over 430 


188 


198 


170 miles and over 


160 


134 


149 


450 miles and over 440 


190 


200 


180 miles and over 


170. 


136 


151 









Applicable to common carriers in Groups A, B, and C, Moore Central 
Railway and Washington and Vandemere Railroad. (See Circulars Nos. 252 
and 253.) 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

September 22, 1926. Clerk. 

Circular No. 279 (Cancels Circular No. 259). 

Cancelled by Circular 284. 



Freight Rates 



193 



MAXIMUM RATES ON MARBLE, GRANITE AND STONE (CRUSHED 
OR RUBBLE), STONE SCREENINGS, GRAVEL (WASHED), SLAG, 
CHERT, CINDERS, AND SAND, IN STRAIGHT OR MIXED CAR- 
LOADS, CARLOAD MINIMUM WEIGHT 90 PER CENT OF MARKED 
CAPACITY OF CAR, EXCEPT WHEN CARS ARE LOADED TO 
THEIR VISIBLE CAPACITY THE ACTUAL WEIGHT WILL GOVERN, 
PER TON OF 2,000 POUNDS 

Table "A" 
Applicable to Common Carriers as shown in Groups A, B, and C of Circulars 
Nos. 252 and 253, also Louisville and Nashville Railroad and Abingdon 
Branch of the Norfolk and Western Railway. 



Distances 



Rate 


Rate 


Single 


Joint 


Line 


Line 


50 


65 


55 


70 


60 


75 


70 


85 


80 


95 


90 


105 


100 


115 


110 


125 


120 


135 


130 


140 


135 


145 


140 


150 


150 


160 


160 


170 


165 


175 


175 


180 


185 


190 


195 


200 


205 


210 



10 miles . 
20 miles. 
30 miles. 
40 miles . 
60 miles . 
80 miles. 



10 miles and under. 

20 miles and over 

30 miles and over 

40 miles and over 

60 miles and over 

80 miles and over 
100 miles and over 
125 miles and over 100 miles . 
150 miles and over 125 miles. 
175 miles and over 150 miles. 
200 miles and over 175 miles. 
230 miles and over 200 miles. 
260 miles and over 230 miles. 
290 miles and over 260 miles. 
320 miles and over 290 miles _ 
360 miles and over 320 miles. 
400 miles and over 360 miles . 
440 miles and over 400 miles. 
480 miles and over 440 miles. 



Table "B" 

When the transportation is in whole or in part over either of the so-called 
short lines, that is independent lines under 75 miles in length, rates are to 
be determined as follows: Apply the rates applicable under appropriate 
scale or scales above set forth plus the following arbitrary which is to accrue 
solely to the short line. Arbitrary: Twenty-five (25) cents per net ton. 
(See Circulars Nos. 252 and 253.) 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

Effective August 1, 1927. Clerk. 

Circular No. 284 (Cancels Circular No. 279). 



194 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



RATES ON HEAVY LOAD-BEARING CONCRETE BLOCKS WITHOUT 
ORNAMENTAL FACE, CARLOAD, MINIMUM 50,000 POUNDS, IN 
CENTS PER 100 POUNDS 





Rate 


Rate 




Rate 


Rate 


Distance 


Single 


Joint 


Distance 


Single 


Joint 




Line 


Line 




Line 


Line 


7 miles and under 


3^ 


±V 2 


97 miles and over 92 


63^ 


7 l A 


12 miles and over 7 


43^ 


5V 2 


100 miles and over 97. 


6^ 


7H 


17 miles and over 12 


4^ 


5V 2 


120 miles and over 100 


7 


8 


22 miles and over 17 __ 


4M 


5V 2 


130 miles and over 120 


7 


8 


27 miles and over 22 


4H 


5V 2 


140 miles and over 130 


7 


8 


32 miles and over 27 


5 


6 


160 miles and over 140 _. 


7 


8 


37 miles and over 32 


5 


6 


180 miles and over 160 


7V 2 


8H 


42 miles and over 37. _ _ 


5 


6 


200 miles and over 180. 


8 


9 


47 miles and over 42 


5 


6 


220 miles and over 200 


8V 2 


9 % A 


52 miles and over 47 


5V 2 


ey 2 


240 miles and over 220 


9 


10 


57 miles and over 52 


5H 


ey 2 


260 miles and over 240 


9V 2 


io y 2 


62 miles and over 57 


5V 2 


6V2 


280 mites and over 260... 


9V 2 


io y 2 


67 miles and over 62 


5V 2 


QV 2 


300 miles and over 280 


10 


n 


72 miles and over 67 


6 


7 


320 miles and over 300 


io H 


HH 


77 miles and over 72 


6 


7 


340 miles and over 320 


n 


12 


82 miles and over 77 


6 


7 


360 miles and over 340 


liH 


12 X 


87 miles and over 82 


6 


7 


380 miles and over 360 


HH 


12 H 


92 miles and over 87 


6H 


7V 2 


400 miles and over 380 


12 


13 



Applicable to lines named in Groups A, B, and O (See Circulars Nos. 252 
and 253). 
By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

September 2, 1924. Clerk. 

Circular No. 262. 
Effective September 20, -1924. 



Freight Rates 195 

ARTIFICIAL BUILDING STONE 
As Per Descriptions Below 

Description "A" 
Building blocks, plain faced, not in imitation of chiseled, dressed, ham- 
mered, or sand rubbed natural stone, loose or in packages, carload minimum 
weight 36,000 pounds, per ton of 2,000 pounds. 

Description "B" 
Blocks, pieces or slabs, N. O. I. B. N., moulded in imitation of chiseled, 
dressed, hammered or sand rubbed natural stone, loose or in packages, car- 
load minimum weight 36,000 pounds, per ton of 2,000 pounds. 

Description "C" 

Blocks, pieces or slabs, N. O. I. B. N., moulded in imitation of carved 
lettered or traced natural stone, packed in excelsior, hay, straw, or similar 
packing material or in packages, carload minimum 36,000 pounds. 

Blocks, pieces or slabs, N. O. I. B. N., in slabs, in boxes or crates, in blocks 
or pieces in boxes or crates or with finished surfaces protected by boxing or 
crating securely strapped to each piece, carload minimum weight 36,000 
pounds, per ton of 2,000 pounds. 

Applicable to common carriers in Groups A, B, and C. (See Circulars 
Nos. 252 and 253). 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

Issued January 20, 1928. Clerk. 

Effective retro-active March 25, 1927. 

Circular No. 286. 



196 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



Miles 




Description "A" 


Description "B" 


Description "C 






Single 


Joint 


Single 


Joint 


Single 


Joint 


5 miles and under 


90 





130 


... 


180 




10 miles and over 


5... 


100 


150 


140 


190 


190 


240 


15 miles and over 


10... 


110 


160 


140 


200 


200 


250 


20 miles and over 


15... 


110 


160 


140 


200 


200 


250 


25 miles and over 


20. _. 


120 


170 


150 


210 


210 


260 


30 miles and over 


25... 


120 


170 


150 


210 


210 


260 


35 miles and over 


30... 


130 


180 


160 


220 


220 


270 


40 miles and over 


35... 


130 


180 


160 


220 


220 


270 


45 miles and over 


40... 


140 


190 


170 


230 


230 


280 


50 miles and over 


45... 


140 


190 


170 


230 


230 


280 


55 miles and over 


50... 


140 


200 


180 


230 


230 


290 


60 miles and over 


55... 


140 


200 


180 


230 


230 


290 


65 miles and over 


60... 


150 


200 


190 


230 


240 


290 


70 miles and over 


65... 


150 


200 


190 


230 


240 


290 


75 miles and over 


70. __ 


160 


210 


200 


240 


250 


300 


80 miles and over 


75... 


160 


210 


200 


240 


250 


300 


85 miles and over 


80... 


170 


220 


210 


250 


260 


310 


90 miles and over 


85... 


170 


220 


210 


250 


260 


310 


95 miles and over 


90... 


180 


230 


220 


260 


270 


320 


100 miles and over 


95... 


180 


233 


220 


260 


270 


320 


1 10 miles and over 


100... 


190 


230 


230 


270 


280 


320 


120 miles and over 


110... 


200 


240 


230 


280 


290 


330 


130 miles and over 


120... 


210 


250 


240 


290 


300 


340 


140 miles and over 


130— 


220 


260 


250 


300 


310 


350 


150 miles and over 


140— 


230 


270 


260 


310 


320 


360 


160 miles and over 


150... 


230 


280 


270 


320 


320 


370 


170 miles and over 


160... 


240 


280 


280 


320 


330 


370 


180 miles and over 


170... 


250 


290 


290 


320 


340 


380 


190 miles and over 


180... 


260 


300 


300 


330 


350 


390 


200 miles and over 


190... 


270 


310 


310 


340 


360 


400 


210 miles and over 


200— 


280 


320 


320 


350 


370 


410 


220 miles and over 


210— 


290 


320 


320 


360 


380 


410 


230 miles and over 


220... 


300 


330 


330 


370 


390 


420 


240 miles and over 


230... 


310 


340 


340 


380 


400 


430 


250 miles and over 


240— 


320 


350 


350 


390 


410 


440 


260 miles and over 


250... 


320 . 


360 


360 


400 


410 


450 


270 miles and over 


260... 


340 


370 


380 


400 


430 


460 


280 miles and over 


270... 


340 


370 


380 


400 


430 


460 


290 miles and over 


280— 


360 


390 


400 


410 


450 


480 


,300 miles and over 


290... 


360 


390 


400 


410 


450 


480 


310 miles and over 


300... 


380 


410 


410 


440 


470 


500 


320 miles and over 


310... 


380 


410 


410 


440 


470 


500 


330 miles and over 


320— 


400 


420 


430 


460 


490 


510 


340 miles and over 


330— 


400 


420 


430 


460 


490 


510 


350 miles and over 


340... 


410 


440 


450 


480 


500 


530 


360 miles and over 


350... 


410 


440 


450 


480 


500 


530 


370 miles and over 


360... 


430 


450 


470 


490 


520 


540 


380 miles and over 


370— 


430 


450 


470 


490 


520 


540 


390 miles and over 


380... 


450 


470 


490 


500 


540 


560 



Freight Rates 



197 



WOOD, FIRE OR CORD, (FOR FUEL PURPOSES) C. L. IN CENTS PER 

CORD 





CARLOAD MINIMUM 


12 cords 














h 38 feet and ovei 
h 40 feet and ovei 


• 36 feet __ 


15 cords 






• 38 feet _ 


16 Cords 








_._17 Cords 














Distance 


Rate 
Single 
Line 




70 




5 . 






70 




10 






78 H 




15 






84 H 




20 






84 M 




30 






99 




40 






112H 




50 






127 




70 






141 y 2 




90 






155 




110 






169 




130 






182 H 


170 miles and over 


150 






197 













Applicable to lines named in Groups A, B, and C (See Circulars Nos. 252 
and 253). 
By order of the Commission : R. O. Seij3\ 

Effective October 1, 1924. 
Circular No. 265 (Cancels Circular No. 263). 



PART TWO 



COMPILATION FROM ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORTS OF ALL RAILROAD COM- 
PANIES OPERATING IN NORTH CAROLINA, SHOWING CAPITALIZATION, 
OPERATING REVENUES, ETC., FOR YEARS ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1926 AND 1927. 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPANY 

Compilation op Railroad Returns por the Years Ending December 31, 1926 and 1927 
PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 



Name 



Official Address 



President 

Executive Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

General Counsel 

Comptroller 

General Manager 

Chief Engineer 

Tax Agent 

General Superintendent Motive Power 



J. R. Kenly 

Lyman Delano.. 
George B. Elliott 

R. A. Brand 

H. L. Borden 

P. R. Albright... 
T. F. Darden... 

H. L. Borden 

JohnT. Reid 

George B. Elliott 
W. D. McCaig_. 
P. R. Albright -. 
J. E. Willoughby 

C. S. Morse 

R. D. Hawkins- 



Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
New York, N. Y. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
New York, N. Y. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

H. Walters, Baltimore, Md.; George C. Jenkins, Baltimore, Md.; Waldo Newcomer, Baltimore, Md. » 
J. J. Nelligan, Baltimore, Md.; F. B. Adams, New York, N. Y.; F. W. Scott, Richmond, Va.; F. K' 
Borden, Goldsboro, N. C; Lyman Delano, Wilmington, N. C; George B. Elliott, Wilmington, N. C; 
H. C. McQueen, Wilmington, N. C; W. W. MacKall, Savannah, Ga.; H. L. Borden, New York, N. Y.; 
J. R. Kenly, Wilmington, N. C. 



ROAD OPERATED— ENTIRE LINE 



1926 



1927 



Main line and branches (miles) 

Second main Track (miles) 

Total trackage 

Length of road owned 



4,996.07 

678.68 

7,028.83 

4,775.43 



5,104.71 

690.08 

7,282.79 

4,794.56 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— ENTIRE LINE 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock_ _ 

Cost of road per mile 

Funded debt , 

Funded debt per mile. 

Cost of road _ 

Cost of^road per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile _ 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total Freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue — 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid 



68,782,900.00 


$ 82,539,400.00 


14,430.35 


17,215.22 


157,678,630.00 


159,403,330.00 


33,018.72 


33 , 246 . 50 


177,940,186.65 


183,265,655.05 


37,261,81 


38,223.66 


82,234,258.70 


82,017,357.95 


17,220.28 


17,158.10 


97,086,517.07 


80,426,296.32 


70,701,770.46 


64,330,334.85 


26,384,746.61 


16,096,061.47 


19,688.65 


15,878.36 


14,337.96 


12,700.56 


68,001,687.40 


58,839,071.46 


26,240,750.30 


19,264,095.41 


13,790.40 


11,616.45 


4,777,646 


3,536,762 


5,321.49 


3,803.26 


.03479 


.03438 


6,725,000.00 


6,050,000.00 



NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 

ilf Employees (1926): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 265; Professional, clerical and 
general, 3907; Maintenance of way and structures, 7,739; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 8,831; 
Transportation (other than train, engine, and yard), 4,425, Transportation (yardmasters, switchtenders 
and hosiers), 358; Transportation (train and engine service), 4,920. Total, 30,445. 
Employees (1927); Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 270; Professional, clerical and 
general 3,729; Maintenance of way and structures, 7,232; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 7,598; 
Transportation (other than train, engine and yard) 4,070; Transportation (yardmasters, switchtenders 
and hostlers), 296; Transportation (train and engine service), 4,415. Total, 27,610. 
ROAD OPERATED— NORTH CAROLINA 





1926 


1927 




1,027.72 


1,027.54 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— NORTH CAROLINA 




1927 



♦Capital stock. _ - 

♦Funded debt 

♦Cost of road 

♦Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue -- 

Operating expenses - 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Total number of passengers carried earning revenue 

Average receipts per passenger per mile 

Taxes paid in North Carolina 



14,770 
33,934 
38,294 
17,697 
20,264 
14,757 
14,669 

5,142 

14 

4 

1,538 

1,297 



,359.30 
,009.91 
,707.37 
,826.16 
,637.21 
,580.55 
,294.93 
,075.96 
,178.30 
,969.97 
,541 

.03570 
,589.74 



17,689, 
34,162, 
39,276, 
17,630, 
18,606, 
14,882, 
14,163, 

4,148, 

13, 

3, 

1,123, 

1,392, 



327.15 

108.61 

339.59 

634.07 

836.81 

799.84 

038.86 

200.77 

330.80 

904.45 

204 

.03466 

254.06 



♦Estimated on mileage basis. 



Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway Company 
Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway Company 

(Operated bt Clinchfield Railroad Co.) 
OFFICERS, 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






New York, N. Y. 




Edward C. Billy 


New York, N. Y. 






New York, N. Y. 






New York, N. Y. 









DIRECTORS 

Edward C. Billy, New' York, N. Y.; C. Ledyard Blair, New York, N. Y.; Mortimer N. Buckner, 
New York, N. Y.; John B. Dennis, New York, N. Y.; N. S. Meldrum, New York, N. Y.; W. W.Miller, 
New York, N. Y.; J. W. Pless, Marion, N. C; W. M. Ritter, Columbus, O,; H. H. Vreeland, New York, 

N. Y. 

ROAD OPERATED— ENTIRE LINE 



Length of road owned. 



266.36 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— ENTIRE LINE 





1927 


Capital stock 


$ 25 000 000 00 


Capital stock, per mile 


93,857.93 
27 879 000 00 


Funded Debt 


Funded debt, per mile 


104 666 61 


Cost of road 


49,710,065.39 
186 627 36 


Cost of road, per mile 


Cost of equipment 


17,957,901.62 
67 415 91 


Cost of equipment, per mile__ _ 







NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 

Employees (1926): Number— Executives, officials and staff assistants, 21; Professional, clerical and 
general, 272; Maintenance of way and structures, 600; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 609, 
Transportation (other than train, engine and yard), 100; Transportation (yardmasters, switch tenders 
and hostlers), 43; Transportation (train and engine service), 284. Total, 1,893. 

Employees (1927): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 22; Professional, clerical and 
general, 260; Maintenance of way and structures, 586; Maintenance of equipment and stores 517; 
Transportation (other than train, engine and yard;, 98; Transportation (yardmasters, switchtenders 
and hostlers), 43; Transportation (train and engine service), 265. Total, 1,791. 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

ROAD OPERATED IN NORTH CAROLINA 





1926 


1927 




117.4 


117.4 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— ENTIRE LINE 



1926 



1927 



♦Capital stock 

♦Funded debt 

♦Cost of road 

♦Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue _ 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expense, per mile 

Total freight revenue. _ 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid in North Carolina 



3,295,449.02 

1,779,073.28 

1,516,375.74 

28,070.26 

15,153.94 

3,164,784.34 

117,498.65 

26,957.28 

1,000.84 

65,678 

.03536 

288,504.06 



11,018 

12,287 

21,910 

7,914 

3,191 

1,807 

1,383 

27 

15 

3,062 

103 

26 

58 

335 



,920.98 
,860.01 
,052.06 
,627.83 
,023.98 
,613.41 
,410.57 
,180.78 
,426.85 
,091.54 
,389.62 
,082.55 
880.66 
,338 

.0343 
,181.91 



♦Estimated on mileage basis. 



Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company 
CAROLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






Washington, D. C. 




L. E. Jeffries 






F. S. Wynn _. 








Washington, D. C. 




G. E. Maudlin 


Washington, D. C. 




M. Middleton. 






L. E. Jeffries. 


Washington, D. C. 




E. H. Kemper 











DIRECTORS— 1927 

William A. Barber, New York City, N. Y.; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C; Fairfax Harrison, 
Washington, D. C; T. H. White, Chester, S. C; S. H. Hardin, Chester, S. C; Geo. H. Dugan, Wash- 
ington, D. C; L. F. Long, Newton, N. C; A. K. Winget, Gastonia, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company, organized July 18, 1895, under the Private Laws 
of North Carolina, 1895, Chapter 190, p. 306; 1901, Chapter 114, p. 301, and the Laws of South Caro- 
lina, Volume 23, State Act No. 337, p. 567, approved February 17, 1900. 



ROAD OPERATED— ENTIRE LINE 





1926 


1927 




124.3 

9.20 
23.30 


124 3 




9 20 




23 30 







N. C. Corporation Commission 

CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— ENTIRE LINE 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt.. _ 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road. 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue _. 

Operating expense _.. 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Total number of passengers carried earning revenue 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile.. 

Taxes paid 



1,404,250.00 


$ 1,404,250.00 


11,297.25 


11,297.25 


2,071,000.00 


2,071,000.00 


16,661.30 


16,661.30 


3,670,267.85 


3,724,678.02 


29,527.50 


29,965.22 


256,427.57 


222,240.98 


2,062.97 


1,787.94 


1,004,838.35 


966,575.88 


620,536.84 


605,197.88 


384,301.51 


361,378.00 


7,526.88 


7,240.26 


4,648.22 


4,533.32 


918,848.89 


887,793.61 


71,472.62 


64,631.41 


6,882.76 


6,650.14 


535.38 


484.13 


56,750 


47,196 


.03582 


.03543 


60,414.16 


52,288.24 



NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 

Employees (1926): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 4; Professional, clerical and 
general, 30; Mainteneance of way and structures, 110; Maintenance of equimpent and stores, 42; 
Transportation (other than train, engine and yard) 34; Transportation (train and engine service), 51; 
Total, 272. 

Employees (1927): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 4; Professional, clerical and 
general, 30; Maintenance of way and structures, 99; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 42; Trans- 
portation (other than train, engine and yard), 34; Transportation (train and engine service), 46 
Total, 255. 



Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company 
road operated— north carolina 





1926 


1927 




87.3 
9.20 


87.3 




9.20 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— NORTH CAROLINA 




1927 



♦Capital stock 

♦Capital stock, per mile 

♦Funded debt 

♦Funded debt, per mile _ _ 

♦Cost of road 

♦Cost of road, per mile 

♦Cost of equipment 

♦Cost of equipment, per mile 

♦Operating revenue 

♦Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile__ 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile __. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Total number of passengers carried earning revenue 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina _ 



986,249.92 

11,297.25 

1,454,531.49 

16,661.30 

2,577,750.75 

29,527.50 

180,100.18 

2,062.97 

822,496.92 

492,985.22 

329,511.70 

8,523.28 

5,108.66 

748,884.84 

61,814.19 

7,760.46 

640.56 

47,931 

.03582 
34,976.07 



986,249.92 

11,297.25 

,454,536.49 

16,661.30 

,615,963.70 

29,965.22 

156,087.16 

1,787.94 

807,353.1 

480,835.77 

326,517.33 

8,366.35 

4,982.75 

739,432.00 

56,104.20 

7,662.51 

581.39 

39,862 

.03542 
28,614.06 



♦Estimated on mileage basis. 



10 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY 

PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






Norfolk, Va. 




F. P. Pelter 






E.D.Kyle 


Norfolk, Va. 






Norfolk, Va. 




J. F. George. __ 


Norfolk, Va. 




W. B. Rodman. _. 


Norfolk, Va. 




J. C. Nelms, Jr 


Norfolk, Va. 




F. P. Pelter . . _ ... 


Norfolk, Va. 




F. L. Nicholson 


Norfolk, Va. 






Norfolk, Va. 






Norfolk, Va. 






Norfolk, Va. 









DIRECTORS 

Philip Allen, Providence, R. I.; Frederic Bull, New York, N. Y.; Lewis L. Clarke, New York, N. Y. ; 
C. E. Foy, New Bern, N. C; E. C. Granbury, New York, N. Y.; J. T. Harkrader, New York, N. Y.; 
George W. Hill, New York, N. Y.; Alvin W. Kuch, New York, N. Y.; Luke V. Lockwood, New York, 
N. Y.; George A. Loyall, Norfolk, Va.; R. H. Swartwout, New York, N. Y.; Janius Parker, New York, 
N. Y.; Ernest Williams, Lynchburg, Va.,; Herbert Williams, Lynchburg, Va. 



Norfolk Southern Railroad Company 
road operated— entire line 



11 





1926 


1927 




790.16 
9.46 

889.97 


789.90 




9.46 




990.78 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— ENTIRE LINE 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 1 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Average receipts per passenger mile 

Taxes paid 



$ 16,000,000.00 


$ 16,000,000.00 


20,249.06 


20,255.72 


16,588,200.00 


16,531,400.00 


20,993.46 


20,928.47 


27,112,978.90 


27,432,847.99 


34,313.27 


34,729.52 


6,352,731.51 


6,752,227.03 


8,039.80 


8,548.20 


10,066,486.86 


9,567,021.40 


7,137,699.89 


6,827,968.52 


2,928,786.97 


2,739,052.88 


10,802.33 


10,267.47 


7,659.46 


7,327.88 


8,666,126.21 


8,352,411.79 


1,128,572.05 


939,849.17 


9,299.62 


8,963.93 


1,211.07 


1,008.66 


1,152,545 


823,396 


.03063 


.03047 


671,864.22 


643,161.41 



NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 

Employees (1926): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 46; Professional, clerical and 
general, 450; Maintenance of way and structures, 752; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 736; 
Transportation (other than train, engine and yard), 577; Transportation (yardmasters, switch tenders 
and hostlers), 25; Transportation (train and engine service), 618. Total, 3,204. 

Employees (1927) : Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 49; Professional, clericzl and 
general, 447; Maintenance of way and structures, 785; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 742 
Transportation (other than train, engine and yard), 565; Transportation (yardmasters, switch tenders 
and hostlers), 29; Transportation (train and engine service), 595; Total, 3,212. 



12 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



ROAD OPERATED— NORTH CAROLINA 





1926 


1927 




679.87 


679.61 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— NORTH CAROLINA 



1926 



1927 



♦Capital stock 

♦Funded debt 

*Cost of road 

*Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Average receipts per passenger mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



$ 13,772,176.00 


$ 13,772,176.00 


14,277,960.00 


14,230,000.00 


27,112,978.90 


27,432,847.99 


6,352,731.51 


6,752,227.03 


8,778,535.16 


8,323,725.78 


6,224,859.28 


5,940,643.09 


2,553,675.88 


2,383,082.69 


10,720.70 


10,166.51 


7,602.05 


7,255.83 


7,727,730.77 


7,434,276.15 


905,164.03 


783,239.55 


9,437.41 


9,080.14 


1,105.42 


956.64 


497,718 


307,433 


.0343 


.03577 


485,462.32 


493,915.16 



♦Estimated on mileage basis. 



Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad Company 



13 



ATLANTIC & NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 

Leased by Norfolk Southern Railroad Company 





OFFICERS— 1927 




Title 


Name 


Official Address 




A. D. O'Bryan. 


Beaufort, N. C. 






Sanford, N. C. 






Vass, N. C. 






Dunn, N. C. 




T. Bodie Ward 


Wilson, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

A. D. O'Bryan, Beaufort, N. C; H. D. Bateman, Wilson, N. C; Mrs. Palmer Jerman, Raleigh, N.C. 
C. B. Park, Raleigh, N. C; Dr. Thurman Kitchin, Forest, N. C; D. H. Collins, Greensboro, N. C; 
J. Laurence Jones, Charlotte, N. C; W. D. LaRoque, Kinston, N. C; J. Y. Joyner, LaGrange, N. C; 
L. H. Cutler, New Bern, N. C; George P. Folk, Raleigh, N. C; C. L. Ives, New Bern, N. C. 



LENGTH OF ROAD 



1926-1927 



Goldsboro to Morehead City (miles) . 



95.818 







CAPITAL STOCK, 


ETC. 






1926-1927 




$ 1,797,200 00 


Capital stock, per mile 


18,756.39 


Funded debt 


325,000 00 


Funded debt, per mile. _ 


3,391.85 


Cost of road 


1,797,200 00 


Cost of road, per mile _ 


18,756.39 




325,000 00 


Cost of equipment, per 


mile 






3,391.85 













Note. — This road is operated by Norfolk Southern Railroad Company, and revenues, operating 
expenses, and other information are included in their report. 



14 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




A. C. Needles. ._ 






W. J. Jenks 






W. S. Battle, Jr. 






E. H. Alden 






B. W. Herrman__ _ 






I. W. Booth. _ 












Thomas W. Reath 






F. M. Rivinus 






W. H. Wilson 






J. E. Crawford 






W. P. Wiltsee . 






J. T. Carey 











DIRECTORS 

W. W. Atterbury, Philadelphia, Pa.; M. C. Kennedy, Philadelphia, Pa.; David Flickwir, Roanoke, 
Va.; Samuel Rea, Philadelphia, Pa.; N.D. Maher, Roanoke, Va.; A. J. County, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. H. 
Alden, Philadelphia, Pa.; A. C. Needles, Roanoke, Va.; T. S. Southgate, Norfolk, Va.; S. P. Bush, Col- 
umbus, Ohio; Isaac T. Mann, Bromwell, W. Va. 



HISTORY 

Organized under Act of General Assembly of Virginia, approved January 15, 1896, entitled, "An Act 
authorizing the purchase of the Railroads and property of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Comj 
pany, sold by foreclosure of a deed of trust or mortgage thereon, to become and be a corporation, to 
adopt a name therefor, and to possess and exercise general and other powers." 



Norfolk and Western Kailway Company 
road operated 


15 




1926 


1927 




2,203.90 

620.76 

13.58 

4,375.86 

2,205.93 


2,203.99 




620.75 




13.58 




4,410.21 




2,205.79 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 




1927 



Capital Stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment par mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger train service revenue, per mile 

Total number of passengers carried earning revenue 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid _ • 



$162 
120 

282 

118 

120 
71 
49 

108 
9 

4 
11 



,562,600.00 
73,693.45 

,067,800.00 
54,429.56 

,855,653.54 
128,225.22 

,212,568.19 
53,588.54 

,409,038.37 

,226,914.18 

,182,124.19 
53,718.54 
31,776.73 

,703,462.59 

,929,747.28 

48,496.29 

4,430.00 

,101,260 

.03455 

,075,000.00 



162,998 

73 

116,456 

52 

295,286 

133 

126,231 

57 

110,948 

69,696 

41,252 

49 

31 

99,992 

9,184 

44 

4 

3,603 

10,300 



,600.00 
,985.79 
,800.00 
,795.95 
,017.09 
,868.58 
,519.69 
,227.35 
,200.64 
,125.63 
,075.01 
,491.78 
,090.05 
,235.10 
,048.76 
,604.54 
,096.84 
,429 

.03412 
,000.00 



Employees (1926): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 192; Professional, clerical and 
general, 3,265; Maintenance of way and structures, 8,853; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 12,061 ; 
Transportation (other than train, engine and yard), 2,221; Transportation (yardmasters, switchtendera 
and hostlers), 465; Transportation (train and engine service), 4,605. Total, 31,662. 

Employees (1927): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 194; Professional, clerical and 
general, 3,413; Maintenance of way and structures, 8,333; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 11,960; 
Transportation (other than train, engine and yard), 2,2 14; Transportation (yardmasters, switchtendera 
and hostlers), 465; Transportation (train and engine service), 4,355. Total, 30,934. 



16 



N. C. Corporation Commission 






ROAD OPERATED 



1926 



1927 



Va.-N. C. state line to Winston-Salem, N. C.\ 

Va.-N. C. state line to Durham, N. C j 

Under trackage rights 



130.74 
.31 



130.70 
.31 



First 
Vice- 
Vicel 
Vice- 
Vice- 

?eer 
Tret 

h 

Get 

Get 
Gei 

Chi 
Ch 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



♦Capital stock 

♦Capital stock, per mile 

♦Funded debt 

♦Funded debt, per mile 

♦Cost of road 

♦Cost of road, per mile 

♦Cost of equipment 

♦Cost of equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net operating expenses 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger train service revenue, per mile 

Total number of passengers carried earning revenue 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



9,634, 

73 

7,116, 

54, 

16,764, 

128, 

7,006, 

53, 

1,241, 

1,820, 

t579, 

9, 

13, 

1,006, 

197, 

7, 

1, 

130, 

102, 



681.65 

693.45 

120.67 

429.56 

165.26 

225.22 

165.71 

588.54 

431.61 

898.54 

466.93 

472.96 

894.68 

834.23 

483.46 

682.83 

506.93 

842 

.03379 

034.00 



9,658, 

73, 

6,900, 

52, 

17,496, 

133, 

7,479, 

57, 

1,384, 

1,804, 

420, 

10, 

13, 

1,158, 

186, 

8, 

1, 

119, 

103, 



179.75 

693.79 

430.66 

795.95 

623.40 

868.58 

614.64 

227.35 

005.08 

168.99 

163.91 

560.90 

767.03 

437.77 

913.74 

839.66 

426.28 

608 

.03351 

171.00 



♦Estimated on mileage basis. 
tDeficit. 



Seaboard Airline Railway Company 17 
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY COMPANY 

PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS— 1927 


Title 


Name 


Official Address 












Norfolk, Va. 




M. H. Cahill 






M. J. Caples 


Norfolk, Va. 




W. R. Bonsai 


Charleston, S. C. 




L. R. Powell, Jr.. 






W. L. Seddon 


Norfolk, Va. 




W. L. Stanley 






Robert L. Nutt. 


New York, N. Y. 




Robert L. Nutt_ _ _ 


New York, N. Y. 




Hornblower, Miller & Garrison 


New York, N. Y. 








James F. Wright _ 


Norfolk, Va. 




L. L. Knight 






W. D. Faucette 


Norfolk, Va. 




J. E. O'Brien 


Norfolk, Va. 















DIRECTORS— 1927 

Franklin Q. Brown, New York, N. Y.; Robert Foster, Jr., New York, N. Y.; F. N. B. Close, New 
York, N.. Y.; James Colgate, New York, N.Y.; C. Sidney Shephard, New Haven, Conn.; Mills B. Lane, 
Savannah, Ga.; L. F. Loree, New York, N. Y.;Robert F. Maddox, Atlanta, Ga.; J.Wm. Middendorf, 
Baltimore, Md.; Robert L. Nutt, New York, N. Y.; L. R. Powell, Jr., Baltimore, Md.; Robert C. Ream, 
New York, N. Y.; J. P. Taliaferro, Jacksonville, Fla.; A. H. Woodard, Woodard, Ala.; D. F. Yoakum, 
New York, N. Y. 



18 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

ROAD OPERATED— ENTIRE LINE 





1926 


1927 




4,032.50 

60.13 

5,388.28 

3,474.14 


4 306 36 




60 27 




5,762.50 




3,458 63 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— ENTIRE LINE 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Total number of passengers carried earning revenue 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid 



$ 60,950 

17 

183,648 

52 

175,135 

50 

57,208 

16 

67,024 

49,253 

17,771 

16 

12 

48,858 

15,981 

12 

4 

3,033, 

[3,472 



,500,00 
,544.05 
,760.00 
,861.64 
,191.23 
,411.09 
,125.05 
,466.84 
,853.89 
,001.64 
,852.16 
,996.76 
,490.02 
,190.26 
,787.16 
,389.90 
,052.80 
,043 

.03540 
,001.02 



60,950 

17 

187,245 

54 

177,835 

51 

59,858 

17 

61,790 

46,873 

14,916 

14 

10 

46,431 

13,243 

10 

3 

2,322 

3,567 



,500.00 
,333.56 
,667.84 
,138.68 
,768.41 
,417.97 
,983.27 
,307.13 
,149.93 
,315.06 
,834.87 
,398.76 
,922.74 
,657.97 
,105.13 
,819.83 
,086.00 
,485 

.03514 
,048.89 



NUMRER OF EMPLOYEES 

Employees (1926): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 301; Professional, clerical and 
general, 3,086; Maintenance of way and structures, 5,716; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 4,104; 
Transportation (other than train, engine and yard), 3,357; Transportation (yardmasters, switchtenders 
and hostlers), 262; Transportation (train and engine service), 3,837. Total, 20,663. 

Employees (1927): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 316; Professional, clerical and 
general, 3,077; Maintenance of way and structures, 5,426; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 3,397; 
Transportation (other than train, engine and yard), 3,225; Transportation (yardmasters, switchtenders 
and hostlers), 233; Transportation (train and engine service), 3,639, Total, 19,413. 



Seaboard Airline Railway Company 



19 



ROAD OPERATED— NORTH CA 


ROLINA 






1926 


1927 




621.29 


621.29 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— NORTH CAROLINA 



1926 



1927 



♦Capital stock 

♦Funded debt 

♦Cost of road 

♦Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue . 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Total number of passengers carried earning revenue 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



10,999,942.82 


$ 10,769,167.49 


32,842,408.31 


33,635,820.49 


31,319,906.10 


31,945,483.00 


10,230,683.02 


60,752,746.79 


15,604,515.53 


14,552,762.24 


9,977,747.95 


9,229,224.16 


5,626,767.58 


5,323,538.08 


24,707.11 


23,041.83 


15,798.07 


14,612.91 


12,430,395.80 


11,856,538.71 


2,887,766.42 


2,469,885.02 


19,681.43 


18,772.82 


4,572.29 


3,910.64 


544,671 


443,651 


.03540 


.03514 


749,230.27 


771,763.47 



♦Estimated on mileage basis. 



20 



N. C. Corporation Commission 
SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 



Name 



Official Address 



President 

Vice-President and General Counsel 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Comptroller 



Fairfax Harrison 

L. E. Jeffries 

H. W. Miller 

E.R.Oliver 

F. S. Wynn 

J. B. Munson 

R. B. Pegram 

C. E. A. McCarthy 
Maury Middleton_ 
E. F. Kemper 



Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Atlanta, Ga.^fl 
New York, N.^Y. 
Washingron, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 



DIRECTORS— 1927 

Guy Cary, New York, N. Y. ; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C. ; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C. ; 
Adrian Iselin, New York, N. Y.; Jackson E. Reynolds, New York, N. Y.; R. S. Reynolds, Louisville, 
Ky. ; Walter S. Case, New York, N. Y. ; Devereux Milburn, New York, N. Y. ; Casper G. Bacon, Boston, 
Mass.; Jonathan Bryan, New York, N. Y.; Jeremiah Milbank, New York, N. Y.; F. D. Wynn, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



i 



Co; 



Southern Kailway Company 
road operated— entire line 



21 



1926 



1927 



Slain line and branches (miles) 

Miles second track 

rotal trackage 

Length of road owned 



6,771.18 

1,060.14 

10,999.07 

4,285.31 



6,772.34 

1,060.22 

11,032.28 

4,286.24 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— ENTIRE LINE 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile. 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid . 



$194,788,500.00 
295,354,300.00 



$ 195,468,760.00 



292,228,100.00 



361,506,007.46 
135,952,066.27 



368,997,473.45 



135,378,388.41 



155 

107 

47 



112 
37 



10 



467,975.76 

866,588.68 

601,387.08 

22,879.49 

15,874.22 

772,537.13 

730,968.66 

16,724.71 

5,852.43 

208,549 

.03450 
351,100.41 



147,639 

103,907 

43,731 

21 

15 

109,331 

33,862 

16 

5 

8,093 

9,454 



,062.60 
,953.32 
,109.28 
,804.04 
,345.62 
,009.39 
,031.68 
,273.27 
,264.14 
,490 

,03391 
,004.38 



NUMRER OF EMPLOYEES 

Employees (1926): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 404; Professional, clerical and 
general, 7,268; Maintenance of way and structures, 13,133; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 
11, 572; Transportation (other than train, engine and yard), 6,491; Transportation (yardmasters, 
switchtenders and hostlers, 609; Transportation (train and engine service), 9,878. Total, 49,355. 

Employees (1927): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 407; Professional, clerical and 
general, 7,245; Maintenance of way and structures, 12,177; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 
11,068; Transportation (other than train, engine and yard), 6,304; Transportation (yardmasters, 
switchtenders and hostlers(, 587; Transportation — train and engine service), 8, 757. Total, 46, 545. 



22 



N, C. Corporation Commission 



ROAD OPERATED— NORTH CAROLINA 



1926 



1927 



Main line and branches, miles, owned. 
Total mileage 



591.40 
1,204.39 



591.00 
1,203.99 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— NORTH CAROLINA 




♦Capital stock 

♦Funded debt 

♦Cost of road 

♦Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger Service train revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina , 



26,687, 

40,946, 

49,772, 

18,755, 

31,203, 

22,020, 

9,182, 

25, 

18, 

23,314, 

7,102, 

19, 

5, 

2,449, 

2,193, 



264.23 

501.93 

667.37 

689.17 

225.79 

964.01 

261.78 

911.13 

286.19 

111.76 

261.59 

360.02 

897.71 

087 

.03485 

311.01 



1927 



26,951 

40,293 

50,878 

18,666 

30,530 

21,999 

8,530 

25 

18 

23,140 

6,615 

19 

6 

2,084 

2,137 



,833.98 

,310.29 

,410.35 

,386.31 

,423.07 

,874.63 

,548.44 

,349.28 

,266.40 

,213.70 

,169.77 

,227.91 

,134.24 

,979 

.034130 

,425.30 



♦Estimated on mileage basis. 



ASHEVILLB AND CRAGGY MOUNTAIN RAILWAY COMPANY 



23 



ASHEVILLE & CRAGGY MOUNTAIN RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Fairfax Harrison 


Washington, D. C. 




F. S. Wynn 






C. E. A. McCarthy 


New York, N. Y. 




M. Middleton 


Washington, D. C. 




E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C. 









DIRECTORS 

Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C; F. S. Wynn, Washington* 
D. C.j C. E. A. McCarthy, New York, N. Y.; E. A. Merrill, New York, N. Y. 

HISTORY 

Organized July 22, 1890, under the laws of North Carolina, under an act of General Assembly, ratified 
March 11, 1889. 

PROPERTY OPERATED 




1927 



Craggy, N. C. to Burnsville Road, N. C. (Miles) 

Connection — Asheville Sou. Ry., N. C. to Glenns Creek, N. C. (miles). 



2.47 
2.27 

4.74 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1926 


1927 




$ 24,200.00 
10,708.00 


$ 24,200.00 


Capital stock, per mile 


9,797.57 


Funded debt 












37,324.83 
16,515.41 


44,111.37 




17,585.85 














16,515.41 
64,064.18 
28,495.90 
35,568.28 
14,428.85 
6,418.00 
61,393.32 


17,858.85 




54,689.33 




22,255.31 


Net Operating Revenue 


32,434.02 


Operating revenue, per mile 


11,537.83 


Operating expenses, per mile 


4,695.21 


Total freight revenue „ 


51,959.35 


Total passenger train service revenue 






13,827.32 


10,961 90 


Total number Passengers carried earning revenue 




Passenger service train revenue, per mile 






Revenue from other sources 


2,670.86 


2,729.98 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile 




Taxes paid, North Carolina 


661.72 


853 . 04 







Employees: Number — General officers, 0; Office clerks, 0; Station agents, 0; Other station men 0; 
Enginemen, 1-1; Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-1; Other trainmen, 2-2; Machinists, 0; Carpenters, 0; 
Other shopmen.O; Telegraph operators.0; Section foremen, 1-1; Other trackmen, 6-4; Other employees, 
;. Total, 12-10. 



24 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



ASHEVILLE SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

(Opebated by Asheville and Cbaqgt Mountain Railway Company) 
OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Fairfax Harrison 


Washington, D. C. 




F. S. Wynn 


Washington, D. C. 


Secretary 


G. E. Mauldin 


Washington, D. C. 




M. Middleton 


Washington, D. C. 




E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C. 









DIRECTORS 

G. H. Dugan, Washington, D. C, L. Fahnestock, Washington, D. C.J Fairfax Harrison, Washington, 
D. C; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized December 29, 1905, under laws of North Carolina. 



PROPERTY OPERATED 








1926 


1927 


Asheville, N. C. to Glenns Creek, N. C. (miles) 


2.18 


2.18 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile _. 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile. 



$ 60,000.00 

27,522.93 



$ 60,000.00 

27,522.93 



53,782.25 
24,670.76 



24,670.76 



53,782.25 
24,670.76 



24,670.76 



Note. — Operating revenue, operating expenses (interest ou bonds not included), net operating 
revenue, operating revenue per mile, operating expenses per mile, total freight revenue, total pas- 
senger train service revenue, freight revenue per mile, total number passengers carried earning rev- 
enue, passenger service train revenue per mile, revnnue from other sources, average receipts per 
passenger per mile, taxes paid N. C, included in operations and report of Asheville aud Craggy 
Mountain Railway Company. 



The Atlanta and Charlotte Airline Railway Company 25 



THE ATLANTA & CHARLOTTE AIR LINE RAILWAY 
COMPANY 



OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Geo. F. Canfield 


New York, N. Y. 






New York, N. Y. 




John W. Platten . . 


New York, N. Y. 











DIRECTORS 

Geo. F. Canfield, 49 Wall St., New York, Robert L. Harrison, 52 Wall St., New York; John A. 
Middleton, 143 Liberty St., New York; John W. Platten, 55 Cedar St., New York; Edwin W. Lancaster, 
160 Broadway, New York; Henry Parish, 52 Wall St., New York, Morean Delano, 59 Wall st., New 
York, Edwin G. Merrill, 76 Williams St., New York; Henry M. McAdenm, Charlotte, N. C; R. Ran- 
dolph Hicks, 49 Wall St., New York, F. Morse Hubbard, 49 Wall St., New York, Samuel Sloan, 22 
Williams St., New York. 

HISTORY 

Organized April 4, 1877. A consolidated company under agreement of April 4, 1877, between three 
separate companies formed March 19, 1877. 



PROPERTY OPERATED 



Total 




Charlotte, N. C. to Armour, Ga. (miles) . 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1926 


1927 


Capital stock _ 


$ 1,700,000.00 

6,655.18 

20,000,000.00 

78,296.28 

21,700,000.00 

84,951.46 

1,128,000.00 


$ 1,700,000.00 


Capital stock, per mile 


6,655.18 


Funded debt 


20,000,000 00 


Funded debt, per mile 


78,269.28 


Cost of road and equipment 


21,700,000.00 


Cost of road and equipment, per mile 


84,951.46 


Revenue from other Sources (from lease of road) __ 


1,128,000.00 







Employees: Number — General Officers, 5-5. Total, 5-5. 

Note. — Road is operated by Southern Railway Company (Lessee) 

CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— NORTH CAROLINA 





1926-1927 


♦Capital stock 


$ 283,776 87 


♦Capital stock, per mile __. 


6,655 18 


♦Funded debt _. 


3,338,402 09 


♦Funded debt, per mile _ _ 


78,269.28 


♦Cost of road and equipment . 


3,622,330.25 




84,951 46 







♦Estimated on mileage basis. 



26 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



THE ATLANTIC AND DANVILLE RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 
















208 Southern Produce 


Auditor i 


J. A. D. Parrish 


Bldg., Norfolk, Va. 









DIRECTORS 

Edgar Newgrass, 16 Gracechurch St., London, England; Felix Rose, 16 Gracechurch St., London, 
England; A. B. Carrington, Danville, Virginia; Chas. O. Haines, 208 Southern Produce Bldg., Norfolk, 
Va.;Edward R. Bairs, Jr., Norfolk, Virginia; C. L. Candler, Norfolk, Va.;W. H. M. Reed, Portsmouth, 
Va. 

HISTORY 
Organized August 2nd, 1894. 

PROPERTY OPERATED 



N. C. 



Total 



Leased to Southern Railway Company who operate. 



22.15 277.71 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock . 

Capital stock, per mile __ 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile. 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile _ 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 



2,180,000.00 

7,849.91 

5,450,000.00 

19,624.79 

7,610,484.35 

27,404.43 

36,820.25 

132.58 

27,537.01 



2,180,000.00 

7,849.91 

5,450,000.00 

19,624.79 

7,610,484.35 

27,404.43 

36,820.25 

132.58 

27,537.01 



Employees: Number — General officers, 3-3. Total, 3-3. 

Note. — Not an operating company, leased to Southern Railway Company and reported by them. 

CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— NORTH CAROLINA 



1926 



1927 



♦Capital stock 

♦Capital stock, per mile. ._ 

♦Funded debt 

♦Funded debt, per mile 

♦Cost of road- _ _ _. 

♦Cost of road, per mile 

♦Cost of equipment 

♦Cost of equipment, per mile 

♦Cost of road and equipment, per mile 



173,875.50 

7,849.91 

434,689.09 

19,624.79 

607,008.12 

27,404.43 

2,936.64 

132.58 

27,537.01 



173,875.50 

7,849.91 

434,689.09 

19,624.79 

607,008.12 

27,404.43 

2,936.64 

132.58 

27.537.01 



♦Estimated on mileage basis. 



Carolina and Tennessee Southern Railroad Company 

CAROLINA AND TENNESSEE SOUTHERN RAILWAY 

COMPANY 



OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 










H. W. Miller 

L. E. Jeffries 










F. S. Wynn 






G. E. Mauldin 






E. F. Parkham 

E. H. Kemper 















DIRECTORS 

Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C; L. A. Mahler, Raleigh, N. C; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C. 
R. B. Pegram, Atlanta, Ga.; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized August 29, 1902, under Laws of North Carolina. 



PROPERTY OPERATE! 


1 






1926 


1927 


Bushnell, N. C. to Fontana, N. C. (miles) 


13.96 


13.96 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1926 


1927 


Capital stock 


$ 60,000.00 

4,297.99 

643,000.00 

46,061.71 

570,865.31 

40,892.93 


S 60,000 00 


Capital stock, per mile 


4,297.99 


Funded debt 


643,000 00 


Funded debt, per mile 


46,061.71 


Cost of road 


577,331.93 


Cost of road, per mile 


41,356 15 







Operated by Southern Railway Company. 



28 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



DANVILLE AND WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 










Washington, D. C. 




Guy E. Maudlin 

M. Middleton 




Washington, D. C. 




E. H. Kemper 











DIRECTORS— 1927 

Geo. H. Dugan, Washington, D. C.; J. P. Swanson, Danville, Va.; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, 
D. C.; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C.; Jas. I. Pritchett, Danville, Va.; R. A. Schoolfield, Danville, Va.; 
J. B. Sparrow, Martinsville, Va. 

HISTORY 

Organized January 14, 1891, under Laws of Virginia. Charter March 29, 1873. Amended Acts 
1876-1877, page 163, 1881-1882, pages 256, 259, 1885-1886 pages 317, 362. 



ROAD OPERATED 








N. C. 


Total 




8.96 


82.04 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile _ 

Funded debt _ 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue — 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina. 



368,600.00 


$ 368,600.00 


4,802.00 


4,802.00 


247,773.75 


2,197,773.75 


29,283.14 


28,631.76 


952,003.27 


1,956,367.09 


25,429.95 


25,486.80 


252,572.31 


249,990.72 


3,290.42 


3,256.78 


28,720.37 


28,743.58 


532,133.59 


544,484.64 


356,278.68 


348,322.21 


175,854.91 


201,162.43 


6,486.27 


6,636.82 


4,342.74 


4,184.81 


478,266.20 


493,230.69 


43,361.85 


39,312.32 


5,829.67 


6,012.08 


36,418 


30,027 


528.55 


479.19 


10,505.54 


11,941.63 


.03564 


.03536 


2,215.58 


2,734.00 



Employees: Number — General officers, 6-5; Office clerks, 46-39; Station agents, 18-17; Other station 
men, 16-12; Enginemen, 5-5; Firemen, 5-5; Conductors, 5-5; Other trainmen, 12-12; Machinists, 4-4; 
Carpenters, 7-7; Other shopmen, 8-9; Telegraph operators, 4-4; Section foremen, 7-7; Other trackmen, 
40-40; Other employees, 20-3; Total, 203-173. 



Danville and Western Railway Company 
road operated— north carolina 



29 



1926 



1927 



Main line (miles) . 



8.'. 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— NORTH CAROLINA 



1926 



1927 



♦Capital stock 

♦Funded debt 

*Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

♦Operating revenue 

♦Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

♦Operating revenue, per mile 

♦Operating expenses, per mile 

♦Total freight revenue 

♦Total passenger train service revenue 

♦Freight revenue, per mile 

♦Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

♦Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

♦Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina. 



43,025.92 

282,376.93 

227,851.35 

29,482.16 

58,116.97 

38,910.95 

19,206.02 

6,486.27 

4,342.74 

52,233.84 

4,735.80 

5,829.67 

3,976 

528.55 

1,147.20 

.03564 

2,215.58 



43,025.92 

256,540.56 

227,361.72 

29,180.74 

59,455.90 

37,495.89 

21,960.01 

6,636.82 

4,184.81 

53,868.23 

4,293.54 

6,012.08 

3,278 

479.19 

1,304.02 

.03536 

2,734.00 



♦Estimated on mileage basis. 



30 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



HIGH POINT, RANDLEMAN, ASHEBORO AND SOUTHERN 
RAILROAD COMPANY 



OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 






Vice-President 


F. S. Wynn 


Washington, D. C. 






Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 




L. E. Jeffries 


Secretary 


G. E. Mauldin__. 


Treasurer 


M. Middleton _ _ 


Washington, D. C. 


Comptroller __ 


E. H. Kemper __ 


Washington, D. C. 









DIRECTORS 

A. M. Bulla, Randleman, N. C; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C.;J. Elwood Cox, High Point, N. C; 
Geo. H. Dugan, Washington, D. C.;T. J. Finch, Thomasville, N. C; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, 
D. C; F. N. Tate, High Point, N. C; P. H. Morris, Asheboro, N. C; J. S. McAllister, Greensboro, 
N. C; A. S. Parker, High Point, N. C; W. H. Ragan, High Point, N. C; J. E. Walker, Asheboro, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized February 26, 1887, under Laws of North Carolina, 1883. 

PROPERTY OPERATED 



1927 



High Point N. C. to Asheboro, N. C. (Miles). 




27.84 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 




1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt . . _ 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue . 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



248,400.00 

8,922.41 

402,000.00 

14,439.65 

683,308.78 

24,544.14 

133,786.98 

89,011.72 

24,775.26 

4,087.18 

3,197.26 

106,957.47 

4,214.01 

3,841.86 

66.67 



.03443 
7,167.87 



248,400.00 

8,922.41 

402,000.00 

14,439.65 

685,222.67 

24,612.88 

125,341.01 

86,484.73 

38,856.28 

4,502.19 

3,106.49 

117,614.41 

3,991.60 

4,225.66 

143.38 

2,121 

.03450 
7,941.98 



Employees (1926): Number — Professional, clerical and general, 3; Maintenance of way and struc" 
tures, 13; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 2; Transportation (other than train.engine, and yard)» 
8; Transportation (train and engine service), 15; Total, 31. 

Employees (1927): Number — Professional, clerical and general, 3; Maintenance of way and struc- 
tures, 13; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 3; Transportation (other than train, engine and yard), 
8; Transportation (train and engine service), 5. Total, 32. 



North and South Carolina Railroad Company 



31 



NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 



President 

Vice-President 
Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Comptroller. _ 



Name 



Fairfax Harrison. _ 

L. E. Jeffries 

F. S. Wynn 

C. E. A. McCarthy 

M. Middleton 

E. H. Kemper 



Official Address 



Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
New York, N. Y. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 



DIRECTORS 

W. S. Camp, Washington, D. C; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C; C. E. A. McCarthy, New 
York, N. Y.; C. D. Mackay, Washington, D. C; C. C. Elder, Greensboro, N. C; Guy E. Maudlin, 
Washington, D. C; E. A. Merrill, New York, N. Y.; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized March 13, 1899, under Laws of North Carolina, February 22, 1890, and amended March 
2. 1899. 

ROAD 





1926 


1927 




4.79 


4.79 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1926 


1927 


Capital stock 


$ 


50,000.00 
13,431.63 
50,000.00 
10,438.41 


$ 50,000.00 


Capital stock, per mile 


13,431.63 


Cost of Road 


50,000.00 


Cost of road, per mile 


10,438.41 







Note. — This railroad is operated by the Southern Railway Company, and revenue, operating 
expenses, and other information are included in their report. 



32 N. C. Corporation Commission 

NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 






Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


W. H. Wood 


Charlotte, N. C. 






Burlington, N. C. 







DIRECTORS 

W. H. Wood, Charlotte, N. O.j W. E. Holt, Lexington, N. C; J. F. Bowles, Statesville, N. C.j Hugh 
MacRae, Wilmington, N. C; M. O. Dickerson, Rutherfordton, N. C; Alexander Webb, Raleigh, N. C; 
G. W. Mountcastle, Lexington, N. C; G. C. White, Durham, N. C; Robert Lassiter, Charlotte, N. C; 
A. M. Dixon, Gastonia, N. C.j Julius W. Cone, Greensboro, N. C; C. A. Hunt, Jr. Lexington, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized January 11, 1850, under Laws of North Carolina. Chartered January 27, 1849, Laws of 
North Carolina, 1848-1849 and Laws February 14, 1855 and February 10, 1874. 

PROPERTY OPERATED 





N. C. 


Total 


Goldsboro, N. C. to Charlotte, N. C. (miles) 


223.55 


223.55 








1926 


1927 


Capital stock 


$ 4,000,000.00 
17,893.08 


$ 4,000,000.00 


Capital stock, per mile 


17.893.08 













Employees: Number — General officers, 4-4; Office clerks, 1-1; Total, 5-5. 



North Carolina Kailroad Company 33 

financial statement 



Receipts 


1926 


1927 


Rental Southern Railway Co 


$ 286,000.00 

988.79 

596.87 

14.00 


$ 286.000.00 




988.79 


Interest 


568.60 






Sale of Real Estate _. 


750.00 




293.00 
158,831.91 






158,491.72 






Total ___ _. 


$ 446,724.57 


$ 446,799.11 






Disbursements 
Dividends paid 


$ 279,930.00 
4,529.92 


$ 279,930.00 




4 , 599 . 86 




559 . 85 




2,676.98 

1,095.95 

158,491.72 


923 . 58 




1,199.17 


Cash on hand- __ 


159,586.65 






Total.. 


$ 446,724.57 


$ 446,799.11 






Assets 
Construction and equipment 


$ 4,975,627.53 

5,000.00 

17.95 

300.00 

158,491.72 


$ 4,975,627.53 


State University R. R. Stock _ 


5,000.00 


Divedend tax 


17.95 




300.00 




159,586 65 






Total 


$ 5,139,437.20 


$ 5,140,532 13 






Liabilities 
Capital stock 


$ 4,000,000.00 

1,134,937.20 

4,392.00 

108.00 


$ 4,000,000 00 


Profit and loss _ 


1,135,962 13 


Dividends unpaid 


4,462 00 


Dividend certificates 


108 00 






Total 


$ 5,139,437.20 


$ 5,140,532 13 







34 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



NORTH CAROLINA MIDLAND RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 



Name 



Official Addreaa 



President 

Vice-Preaident 

Vice-President 

Vice-President and General Counsel 

Secretary.. 

Treasurer 

Comptroller 



Fairfax Harrison 
H. W. Miller. ... 

F. S. Wynn 

L. E. Jeffries 

G. E. Mauldin.. 
M. Middleton... 
E. H. Kemper.. 



Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 



DIRECTORS 

J. Gray, Winston-Salem, N. C.j G. W. Mountcastle, Lexington, N. C; C. P. McNeely, Mooresville, 
N. C; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C; Geo. H. Dugan, 
Washington, D. C ; Thos. Barber, Winston-Salem, N. C; W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem, N. C; R. 
T. Chatam, Winston-Salem, N. C; J. F. Hanes, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized September, 1880. The Winston-Salem and Mooresville Railroad Company was chartered 
in North Carolina on August 6, 1878. This company on September 9, 1880, consolidated with the Dan 
Valley and Yadkin River Railroad Company and the Winston-Salem and Madison Railroad Com- 
pany. The Dan Valley and Yadkin River Narrow-gauge Railroad Company was chartered in Virginia, 
January 27, 1879 (see Acts of Virginia, 1879, as amended by acts of Virginia, 1879-1880). On January 
22, 1883, the North Carolina Midland Railroad Company and the Dan Valley and Yadkin River Nar- 
row-guage Railroad Company were consolidated under the style of the North Carolina Midland Rail- 
road Company. (See Battle's Revisal of North Carolina.) 



ROAD OPERATED 



Mooresville, N. C, to Winston-Salem, N. C. (miles). 



1926 



53.50 



1927 



53.50 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile. 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile. 



1926 



924,000.00 
17,271.02 

801,000.00 

14,971.96 

1,722,000.00 

32,186.92 



1927 



924,000.00 
17,271.02 

801,000.00 

14,971.96 

,721,939.30 

32,185.78 



NOTE — This road is operated by the Southern Railway Company. 



North Carolina Midland Railroad Company 35 

SOUTHERN RAILWAY— CAROLINA DIVISION 



OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 



Name 



Official Address 



President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President and General Counsel 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Comptroller 



Fairfax Harrison 
H. W. Miller.— 

F. S. Wynn 

L. E. Jeffries 

G.'E. Maudlin. _ 
M. Middleton... 
E. H. Kemper _. 



Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C, 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 



DIRECTORS— 1927 

L. Green, Washington, D. C; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C; H. W. Miller, Washington, 
D. C; Geo. H. Dugan, Washington, D. C; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized under General Laws of South Carolina, authorizing consolidation of corporations, June, 
1902. 



ROAD 








1926 


1927 




756.76 
698.03 


756 . 76 


Length of road owned (included in Southern Railway report) _. 


698.03 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 



4,176,200.00 

5,928.37 

11,259,500.00 

16,130.39 

14,890,212.89 

21,331.76 

631,406.19 

904.55 



4,176,200.00 

5,928.37 

11,259,500.00 

16,130.39 

14,890,212.89 

21,331.76 

631.406.19 

904.55 



36 



N. C. Corporation Commission 





ROAD— NORTH CAROLINA 






1926-1927 




106 . 68 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926-1927 



♦Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

♦Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

*Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 



632,438.31 

5,928.37 

1,710,790.00 

16,130.39 

2,275,672.15 

21,331.76 

96,897.39 

904 . 55 



♦Estimated on mileage basis. 

Note. — This railroad is operated by the Southern Railway Company, and revenue, operating 
expenses and other information are included in Southern Railway report. 



State University Kailroad Company 37 

STATE UNIVERSITY RAILROAD COMPANY 



OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 



Name 



Official Address 



President 

Vice-President 
Vice-President 
Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Comptroller... 



Fairfax Harrison 
H. W. Miller— . 
L. E. Jeffries.... 

F. S. Wynn 

G. E. Maudlin.. 
M. Middleton... 
E. H. Kemper... 



Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C- 



DIRECTORS 

Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C; Geo. H. Dugan, Washington, 
D. O.J F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C.; R. B. Pegram, Atlanta, Ga.; W. P. Few, Durham, N. C; W. A. 
Erwin, W. Durham, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized April 12, 1879, under Laws of North Carolina, 1872-1873. Amended, 1879. 



ROAD 




1927 



University, N. C, to Chapel Hill, N. C. (miles). 



10.15 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1926 


1927 




$ 


31,300.00 
3,083.74 

72,939.64 
7,186.17 


$ 31,300.00 


Capital stock, per mile. 


3,083.74 




72,888.78 




7,181.16 







Note. — This railroad is operated by the Southern Railway Company and revenue, operating 
expenses, and other information are included in their report. 



38 



N. C. Coeporation Commission 



YADKIN RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 



President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President and General Counsel 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Comptroller 



Name 



Fairfax Harrison 

F. S. Wynn 

Geo. H. Dugan. 
L. E. Jeffries 

G. E. Maudlin. _ 
M. Middleton... 
E. H. Kemper... 



Official Address 



"Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, C. D. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 



DIRECTORS— 1927 

Geo. H. Dugan, Washington, D. C; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C; S. H. Hearne, Albemarle, 
N. C; D. W. Julian, Salisbury, N. C; J. M. Nichols, Washington, C. D.; J. M. Morrow, Albemarle, 
N. C; Walter Murphy, Salisbury, N. C; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized'August 19, 1895, under Laws of North Carolina, 1871. 



Yadkin Kailroad Company 
road operated— entire line— north carolina 



39 




1927 



Salisbury, N. C. to Norwood, N. C. (Miles) 

Leased — Tallassee Power Co. — 

Halls Ferry Junction, N. C. to Badin, N. C. (miles) 



41.00 
11.23 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road - - 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment __. 

Cost of equipemnt, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Total number of passengers carried earning revenue 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



625,000.00 


$ 625,000.00 


15,244.00 


15,244.00 


615,000.00 


615,000.00 


15,000.00 


15,000.00 


138,389.42 


1,376,085.87 


33,743.64 


33,563.07 


8,624.98 


8,567.28 


210.36 


208.95 


357,799.08 


373,694.05 


242,276.87 


243,473.80 


115,522.21 


130,220.25 


6,850.45 


7,154.78 


4,638.65 


4,661.57 


335,630.42 


349,957.91 


19,953.49 


18,822.97 


6,426.01 


6,700.32 


164.68 


360.39 


14,864 


12,546 


.03644 


.03524 


14,314.00 


12,837.89 



Employees (1926): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 2; Professional, clerical and 
general, 12; Maintenance of way and structures, 36; Transportation (other than train, engine and 
yard), 13; Transportation (train and engine service), 18. Total, 81. 

Employees (1927): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 2; Professional, clerical and 
general, 12; Maintenance of way and structures, 33; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 0; Transpor- 
tation (other than train, engine and yard), 14; Transportation (train and engine service), 18. Total, 79. 



40 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



ATLANTIC AND YADKIN RAILWAY COMPANY 

A. E. Smith and J. W. Fry, Receivers 
OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




F. S. Wynn .__ . 






Guy E. Mauldin 


Washington, D. C. 




M. Middleton 


Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 




E. H. Kemper 







DIRECTORS— 1927 

George H. Dugan, Washington, D. C; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C.; F. S. Wynrt, Washington, 
D. C.; A. E. Smith, Mt. Airy, N. C.; J. C. Watkins, Greensboro, N. C. 



ROAD OPERATED 








N. C. 


Total 




163.1 


163 1 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Funded debt 

Cost of road 

Cost of equipment 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue per mile 

Operating expenses per mile . 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue- 
Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid 



1,000,000.00 
1,500,000.00 
2,397,690.57 



1,508,055.90 

1,032,404.40 

475,651.50 

9,246.20 

6,329.89 

1,335,278.01 

144,112.50 

8,186.87 

883.58 

83,212 

.03564 
35,000.00 



1,000 
1,500 
2,450 

1,327 
994 
332 



1,197 
105 

7 



,000.00 
,000.00 
,347.35 

741.00 
,096.65 
,297.74 
,798.91 
,136.71 
,096.25 
,049.55 
,556.69 
,339.36 

647.19 
,749 

.03477 
,405.00 



Employees (1926): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 9; Professional, clerical and 
general, 36; Maintenance of way and structures, 154; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 15; 
Transportation (other than train, engine and yard), 57; Transportation (train and engine service), 
90. Total, 361. 

Employees (1927): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 7; Professional, clerical and 
general, 37; Maintenance of way and structures, 172; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 15; 
Transportation (other than train, engine and yard), 57; Transportation (train and engine service), 
96. Total 384. 



Tallulah Falls Railway Company 
TALLULAH FALLS RAILWAY COMPANY 

(J. F. Gray, Receiver) 
OFFICERS— 1927 



41 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




R. B. Pegram 


Atlanta, Ga. 




F. S. Wynn _ 






Guy E. Maudlin ._ 






M. Middleton 

















DIRECTORS— 1927 

Geo. H. Dugan, "Washington, D. C.; Chas. A. Thomason, Atlanta, Ga.; H. C. Couch, Atlanta, Ga.; 
R. B. Pegram, Atlanta, Ga.; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized March 8, 1898, under General Laws of State of Georgia. 

ROAD OPERATED— ENTIRE LINE 





1926 


1927 




57.1 


57.1 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC 






' 


1926 


1927 




$ 323,400.00 

5,663.75 

1,519,000.00 

26,602.45 

1,581,580.47 

27,698.43 

114,943.63 

2,013.02 


$ 323,400 00 




5,663 75 


Funded debt 


1,519,000 00 




26,602 45 




1,581,580 47 




27,698 43 




120,200 37 




2,105 08 
























Operating expenses, per mile 






Total freight revenue 






Total passenger train service revenue 






Freight revenue, per mile -- 
























Taxe3 paid 













42 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

ROAD OPERATED— NORTH CAROLINA 




1927 



Georgia — N. C. State Line to Franklin, N. C. (miles) . 



14 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1927 



♦Capital stock... _ 

♦Capital stock, per mile 

•Funded debt 

♦Funded debt, per mile 

♦Cost of road 

♦Cost of road, per mile 

•Cost of equipment 

•Cost of equipment, per mile 

♦Operating revenue 

♦Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

♦Operating revenue, per mile. 

♦Operating expenses, per mile 

♦Total freight revenue 

♦Total passenger train service revenue 

♦Freight revenue, per mile 

♦Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

♦Total number of passengers carried earning revenue- 
Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



79,291.50 

5,663.75 

372,434.30 

26,602.45 

387,778.02 

27,698.43 

28,182.28 

2,013.02 

34,630.06 

49,911.82 

-15,281.76 

2,473,58 

3,565.13 

24,102.90 

7,701.16 

1,721.64 

550.08 

10,523 

.03516 



79,291.50 

5,663.75 

372,434.30 

26,602.45 

387,778.02 

27,698.43 

29,471.12 

2,105.08 

28,016.99 

44,097.10 

-16,080.11 

2,001.21 

3,149.79 

19,417.02 

6,330.16 

1,386.93 

452.15 

7,745 

.03672 



♦Estimated on mileage basis. — Deficit, 



Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company 43 

WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND RAILWAY COMPANY 

PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




H. E. Fries _ .__ 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 




J. R. Kenly _ _________ 


Wilmington, N. C. 




J. F. Post__ _ 






John T. Reid 


Wilmington, N. C. 






Winston-Salem, N. C. 




W. D McCaig__ ___ 






J. E. Willoughby _ 






G. F. Turley ______ 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 






S. P. Collier 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 









DIRECTORS— 1927 

H. E. Fries, Winston-Salem, N. C; N. D. Maher, Roanoke, Va.; D. W. Flickwir, Roanoke, Va.; 
J. R. Kenly, Wilmington, N. C; George B. Elliott, Wilmington, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Date of organization, February 13, 1905. 

Organized under the Laws of the State of North Carolina, Private Laws of the State of North 
Carolina, passed by the General Assembly at its session of 1905 (page 93), chapter 34, entitled "An 
Act to Incorporate the Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company," amending sections 10 and 
11 of the Private Acts of 1905, chapter 34, page 96, ratified January 31, 1907. 

Private Laws of the State of North Carolina, passed by the General Assembly at its session of 1909 
(page 539), chapter 252, entitled "An Act extending the time for construction of the Winston-Salem 
Southbound Railway Company," ratified March 5, 1909. 

Acts of the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina, H. B. 888, S. B. 584, entitled "An 
Act to amend the charter of the Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company," amending section 
2 of chapter 34 of the Private Laws of North Carolina passed at its session of 1905, ratified February 11, 
1911. 

Private Laws of the State of North Carolina, passed by the General Assembly at its session of 1911 
(page 892), ohapter 357, entitled "An Act to amend An Act relating to the Southbound Railway 
Company," ratified February 25, 1911. 



44 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

ROAD OPERATED— NORTH CAROLINA 





1926 


1927 




87.7 
6.82 


87 7 




6 82 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 




1927 



Capital stock _. 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger train service revenue, per mile 

Total number of passengers carried earning revenue 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid 



1,245 

14 

5,000 

57 

5,388 

61 

692 

7 

1,498 

921 

576 

15 

9 

1,384 

94 

14 

31 

125 



,000.00 
,196.12 
.000.00 
,012.54 
,418.61 
,441.49 
,850.98 
,181.88 
,280.44 
,978.92 
,301.52 
,851.46 
,754.83 
,042.17 
,637.58 
,642.85 
,001.24 
,091 

.03411 
,500.00 



1,245 

14 

5,000 

57 

5,473 

62 

692 

7 

1,559 

917 

641 

16 

9 

1,455 

85 

15 

26 

139 



,000.00 
,196.12 
,000.00 
,012.54 
,673.05 
,413.60 
,850.98 
,900.24 
,343.47 
,897.23 
,446.24 
,497.50 
,711.14 
,170.79 
,721.58 
,395.57 

906.91 
,880 

.03281 
,000.00 



Employees (1926): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 4; Professional, clerical and 
general, 37; Maintenance of way and structures, 110; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 4; Trans- 
portation (other than train, engine and yard), 19; Transportation (train and engine service). 53. 
Total, 223. 

Employees (1927): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 4; Professional, clerical and 
general, 37; Maintenance of way and structures, 124; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 5; Trans- 
portation (other than train, engine and yard), 21, Transportation (train and engine service), 53; Total, 
244. 



Aberdeen and Kockfish Railroad Company 



45 



ABERDEEN AND ROCKFISH RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




W. A. Blue 












H. McC. Blue 






G. F. Dempsey 


Fayetteville, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 



W. A. Blue, H. J. Blue, H. McC. Blue, J. W. Graham, J. A. Bryant, all of Aberdeen, N. C. and H. W 
Jackson of Richmond, Va. 

HISTORY 

Organized June 22, 1892, under Laws of North Carolina, Secretary of State, also chapter 22 of 1893, 
Chapter 45 of 1901, Chapter 401 of 1907, Chapter 200 of 1911, Chapter 289 of March, 1913. 

PROPERTY OPERATED 




1927 



Aberdeen, N. C. to Fayetteville, N. C. (miles). 



44.9 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passenger carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



1926 



208,800. 

4,650. 

165,000. 

3,674. 

341,373. 

7,602. 

87,321. 

1,944. 

9,547. 

204,058. 

131,297. 

72,761. 

4,544. 

2,924. 

185,420. 

10,150. 

4,129. 

9,232 

221. 



.03436 
7,239.89 



1927 



208,800.00 
4,650.33 

165,000.00 
3,674.83 

341,373.26 

7,602.97 

87,321.13 

1,944.79 

9,547.76 

204,092.81 

156,302.31 

47,790.50 

4,545.49 

3,481.12 

190,409.84 
9,245.25 
4,240.75 
7,276 

205.90 

4,437.72 

.03436 

6,244.57 



Employees: Number — General officers, 6-6; Office clerks, 1-1; Station agents, 3-3; Other station men 
5-5; Enginemen, 2-2; Firemen, 2-2; Conductors, 2-2; Other trainmen, 3-3; Machinists, 2-2; Carpenters 
1-1; Other shopmen, 1-1; Section Foremen, 5-; Other trackmen, 20-20; Total, 53-53. 



46 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



APPALACHIAN RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






New York, N. Y. 




J. A. Sisk 


Ela, N. C. 




J. R. Alloy.. 


Waynesville, N. C. 
Ela, N. C. 




J. A. Sisk 









DIRECTORS 

A. J. Stevens, New York, N. Y.; J. R. Alloy, Waynesville, N. O.J R. W. Brining, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
F. L. Beer, Philadelphia, Pa.; J. A. Sisk, Ela, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized July 30, 1908, under the Laws of North Carolina. 

PROPERTY OPERATED 



Ela, N. C. to Ravensford, N. C. (miles). 




CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile " 

Funded debt . 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile ' 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

* Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total Passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

fRevenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



100,000.00 


$ 100,000.00 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


70,000.00 


43,000.00 


7,000.00 


4,300.00 


323,093.83 


323,093.83 


32,309.38 


32,309.38 


10,085.14 


10,085.14 


1,008.51 


1,008.51 


33,317.89 


33,317.89 


117,637.17 


98,997.36 


90,000.14 


85,199.35 


27,637.03 


13,798.01 


11,763.71 


9,899.73 


9,000.01 


8,519.93 


112,032.06 


94,291.36 


3 , 734 . 20 


2,437.50 


11,203.20 


9,429.13 


6,499 


6,418 


373.42 


243.75 


*3,889.88 


*2,818.86 


.05 


2.63 


2,198.27 


3,013.16 



*$3 , 889 . 88 Non-operating revenue not included. fSee non-operating revenue. 

*$6 , 852 . 52 Non-operating revenue not included. 

Employees: Number — General officers, 5-4; Office clerks, 1-1; Station Agents, 2-2; Other station men, 
1-1; Enginemen, 1-1; Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 2-1; Other trainmen, 2-2; Section Foremen, 2-2; Other 
trackmen, 12-12; Other employees, 1. Total, 30-27. 



Atlantic and Carolina Railroad Company 



47 



ATLANTIC AND CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


R. G. Turnbull 

J. E. Jerritt. _ 

W. J. Jones 

T. A. Hefty __ 


Norfolk, Va. 
Kenansville, N. C. 




Norfolk, Va. 


Vice-President 


Kenansville, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

R. C. Turnbull, Norfolk, Va.; H. D. Williams, Kenansville, N. C; W. J. Jones, Norfolk, Va.; R. D. 
Johnston, Warsaw, N. C; T. A. Hefty, Kenansville, N. C; J. E. Jerritt, Kenansville, N. C; L. A. 
Beasley, Kenansville, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized April 21, 1914, under Laws of North Carolina, Chapter 61, Revisal 1905, B, Section 2549, 
Revisal. 

PROPERTY OPERATED 



1927 



Kenansville, N. C. to Warsaw, N. C. (miles). 




10 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per. mile 

Funded Debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



10,000.00 

1,000.00 

34,000.00 

3,400.00 

66,230.00 

6,623.00 

2,146.23 

214.62 

6,837.62 

25,097.70 

20,119.95 

4,977.75 

2,509.77 

2,011.99 

23,325.65 

516.34 

2,332.56 

1,695 

51.63 
1,255.71 
.0363 
900.45 



10,000.00 

1,000.00 

34,000.00 

3,400.00 

66,230.00 

6,623.00 

2,146.23 

214.62 

6,837.62 

16,463.78 

16,938.73 

474.95* 

1,646.37 

1,693.87 

14,854.06 

412.96 

1,485.40 

1,374 

41.29 

1,196.76 

.0363 

909 . 14 



Employees: Number — General officers, 7-7; Office clerks, 1-1; Station agents, 1-1; Other station men, 
1-1; Enginemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-1; Other trainmen, 1-1; Section Foremen, 1-1; Other trackmen, 
4-4; Total, 18-18. 



48 N* C. Corporation Commission 

ATLANTIC AND WESTERN RAILROAD COMPANY 

(Sold August 1st and organized under name of Atlantic & Western Railway Co.) 
OFFICERS 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


H. C. Huffer, Jr 






E. T. Ussery _ 


New York, N. Y. 
Sanford, N. C 




W. R. Sullivan 


33 Pine St., New York 


Traffic Manager 


E. T. Ussery 


Sanford, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

H. C. Huffer, Jr., N. A. Campbell, 300 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y.; H. P. Edwards, J. W, 
Cunningham, Sanford, N. C; W. R. Sullivan, 33 Pine St., New York, N. Y.; Louis d'Aillieries, Paris. 
France; J. R. Baggett, Lillington, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized March 7, 1899, under Laws of North Carolina, Private Laws of North Carolina, Session 
1899, Chapter 363, Chapter 49 of Volume of Code of North Carolina and Amendments. 



PROPERTY OPERATED 








1926 


1927 




24 


24 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1927 



Capital stock _ 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue ; - 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. _ 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



332,000.00 

13,833.34 

332,000.00 

13,833.00 

565,796.27 

23,574.84 

67,755.09 

2,823.13 

26,397.87 

43,773.30 

39,899.95 

3,873.35 

1,823.88 

1,662.49 

40,110.00 

2,647.72 

1,671.67 

4,149 

110.32 

12.00 

.036 

1,103.70 



Employees: Number — General officers, 7-; Office clerks, 1-; Station agents, 5-; Other station men, 
1-; Enginemen, 2-; Firemen, 2-; Conductors, 1-; Other trainmen, 4-; Machinists, 1-; Other shopmen 
1-; Section foremen, 2-; Other trackmen, 12-; Other employees, 1-; Total, 40-; 



Atlantic and Western Kailroad Company 



49 



ATLANTIC AND WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




H. C. Huffer, Jr 


366 Madison Ave. 




E. T. Ussery 


New York, N. Y. 
Sanford, N. C. 




W. R. Sullivan 


33 Pine St., New York 




W. R. Williams 


Sanford, N. C. 




E. T. Ussery 


Sanford, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

H. C. Huffer, Jr., 366 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. ; N. A. Campbell, 306 Madison Ave., New York, 
N. Y.; W. R. Sullivan, 33 Pine St., New York, N. Y.; W. R. Williams, L.P. Wilkins, Sanford, N. C; 
E. T. Ussery, Austin McCormick, Sanford, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized August, 1927, under laws of North Carolina; Chapter 22, Article 12, Section 1223 of the 
C onsolidated Statutes of the State of North Carolina, 

ROAD OPERATED 





1926 


1627 


Sanford N*. C. to Lillington, N. C. (miles) 


24 


24 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1927 




$ 40,000.00 
1,666 67 




Funded debt ___ _ __ . . . . _. _. 


60,000.00 
2 500 00 


Funded debt, per mile __ __ _ _ _ - ... 


Cost of road ______ __ _ 


227,464 65 


Cost of road, per mile - __ __ __._ __ 


9,477 69 




30,080 00 




1,253 33 




10,731 02 


Operating revenue __ _ 


30 689 33 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) _ _ 


28,591 39 


Net operating revenue __ __ _ _ 


8,097 94 


Operating revenue, per mile _ _. _ _ 


1,528 30 


Operating expenses, per mile _ _ 


1,189 96 


Total freight revenue _ _ _ _ 


33 904 01 


Total passenger train service revenue . __ 


2,253 35 


Freight revenue, per mile _ __ 


1,416 83 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue 


4,056 


Passenger Service train revenue, per mile 


93 89 


Revenue from other sources __ _ ___ _ 


649 47 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile. __ _ 


.036 


Taxes paid, North Carolina _ __ _ _ 


303 15 







Employees: Number — General officers, 6; Office clerks, 2; Station agents, 5; Other station men, 2; 
Enginemen, 2; Firemen 2; Condudtors, 2; Other trainmen, 2; Machinists, 1; Other shopmen, 1; Sec- 
tion foremen, 2; Other trackmen, 12; Other employees, 1. Total, 40. 



50 



M. C. Corporation Commission 



BLACK MOUNTAIN RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




President 




New York, N. Y. 
Erwin, Tennessee 
Erwin, Tennessee 
Erwin, Tennessee 




General Manager or Superintendent 








J. B. Britton, Jr.. __. . 




Treasurer 













DIRECTORS 

John B. Dennis, New York, N. Y. ; Jas. J. McLaughlin, Erwin, Tenn.; L. H. Phetteplace, Erwin 
Tenn.; J. W. Pless, Asheville, N. C; Geo. T. Wofford, Johnston City, Tenn.; Adam B. Crouch, Johnson 
City, Tenn. 

HISTORY 
Organized April 21, 1910, under Laws of North Carolina, Chapter of "Revisal of 1905" as amended 
by Chapter 472, passed in 1907 session of the General Assembly. 

ROAD OPERATED 





1926 


1927 




21.62 
2.11 


21.59 




2.11 






Total 


23.73 


23.70 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt. 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile.. 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



50,000.00 


$ 50,000.00 


2,107.04 


3,649.64 


600,000.00 


600,000.00 


25,284.45 


43,795.62 


436,696.03 


275,769.40 


18,402.70 


20,129.15 


7,310.28 


7,310.28 


308.06 


533.60 


18,710.76 


20,662.75 


64,203.55 


66,386.46 


43,231.21 


44,408.26 


20,972.34 


21,978.20 


2,705.59 


4,095.40 


1,821.80 


2,739.56 


60,849.98 


65,106.58 


2,556.48 


997.54 


2,564.26 


4,016.45 


2,625 


1,013 


106.59 


61.54 


797.09 


282.34 


3.49 


3.58 


7,025.48 


4,124.97 



Employees: Number — General officers, 8-8; Office clerks, 1-1; Station agents, 2-2; Enginemen, 1-1; 
Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-1; Other trainmen, 2-2; Other shopmen, 1-1; Section foremen, 3-2; Other 
trackmen, 13-8. Total, 33-27. 



BONLEE AND WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 



5L 



BONLEE AND WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




I. H. Dunlap. 


Bonlee, N. C. 


General Manager or Superintendent 


G. H. Andrews 

A. F. Andrews 


Bennett, N. C. 
Bennett, N. C. 




Bennett, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

I. H. Dunlap, Bonlee, N. C.; P. G Dunlap, Little Rock, S. C.; John H. Dunlap, Bonlee, N. C.; A. F, 
Andrews, Bennett, N. C.; C. M. Andrews, Bonlee, N. C.; C. C. Brewer, Siler city, N. C.; G. H. Andrew*. 
Bennett, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized October 12, 1908, under Laws of North Carolina, North Carolina Revisal of 1905, Chapter 
61, entitled "Railroads." 



ROAD OPERATED 








1926 


1927 


Bonlee, N. C. to Bennett, N. C. (miles). 


10.37 


10.37 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1926 


1927 




$ 61,600.00 
5,951.69 


$ 61,600.00 


Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt _ 


5,866.66 
8,000.00 


Funded debt, per mile 




761.90 


Cost of road 


60,256.00 
5,821.84 

21,872.87 
2,113.32 
7,935.16 

18,272.37 

17,437.20 

835.17 

1,765.45 

1,684.75 

17,806.00 


61,193.30 


Cost of road, per mile 


5 , 827 . 93 


Cost of equipment 


20,915.57 


Cost of equipment, per mile 


1,991.96 


Cost of road and equipment, per mile 


7,819.89 


Operating revenue 


10,744.99 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) . 


12,820.57 


Net operating revenue _ _ __ 


2,075.58 


Operating revenue, per mile- .. __ _ 


1,023.33 


Operating expenses, per mile 


1,221.01 


Total freight revenue 


10,674.23 


Total passenger service revenue _ . 


Freight revenue, per mile _ v 


1,726.18 


1,016.59 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue -_ . . . 




Passenger service train revenue, per mile 






Revenue from other sources 




70.76 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile 






Taxes paid, North Carolina 


468.49 


382 . 00 







Employees: Number — General officers, 5-1; Station agents, 1-2; 
foremen, 1-1; Other trackmen, 4-2; Total, 13-8. 



Enginemen, 1-1; Firemen, 0-1; Section 



52 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




G. R. Loyall 


Norfolk, Va. 




J. C. Poe 


Kinston, N. C. 




M. S. Hawkins- -_ 


Norfolk, Va. 




J. F. George 

J. F. Dalton 


Norfolk, Va. 




Norfolk, Va. 









DIRECTORS 

G. R. Loyall, Norfolk, Va.; W. B. Rodman, Norfolk, Va.; E. D. Kyle, Norfolk, Va.; M. S. Hawkins 
Norfolk, Va. 

HISTORY 

Organized December 11, 1912, under Laws of North Carolina; General Laws of North Carolina as 
set out in Chapter 61 of Pells Revisal of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 








1926 


1927 


Kinston, N. C, to Snow Hill, N. C. (miles) - 


13.095 
2.133 






15.228 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating Revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



35,000.00 


$ 35,000.00 


2,672.78 


2,672.78 


39,000.00 


39,000.00 


2,978.24 


2,978.24 


93,111.37 


93,111.37 


7,110.45 


7,110.45 


915.00 


915.00 


69.87 


69.87 


7,180.32 


7,180.32 


27,067.44 


30,458.69 


22,463.88 


23,315.79 


4,603.56 


7,142.90 


1,777.48 


2,000.17 


1,475.17 


1,531.11 


25,490.56 


28,854.51 


1,128.07 


1,253.32 


1,673.93 


1,894.83 


7,456 


7,996 


74.08 


82,303.00 


448.81 


350.86 


.09268 


11.9348 


1,959.76 


1,016.98 



Employees: Number — General Officers, 5-5; Office clerks, 1-1, Station agents, 1-1; Other station men, 
1-1; Enginemen, 1-1; Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-1; Other trainmen, 1-1; Section foremen, 1-1; Other 
trackmen, 4-4. Total, 17-17. 



Carolina and Georgia Railway Company 



53 






^CAROLINA AND GEORGIA RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




John C. Arbogast 


Asheville, N. C. 


General Manager or Superintendent 




Asheville, N. C. 


S. F. Chapman. _ __ . 


Asheville, N. C. 




F. J. Heazel „ .- 


Asheville, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

John C. Arbogast, Asheville, N. C; S. F. Chapman, Asheville, N. C; R. Y. Grant, Asheville, N. C. 
F. J. Heazel, Asheville, N. C; J. B. Anderson, Asheville, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized March 19, 1919, under the Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 








N. C. 


Total 




24.84 


24.84 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) . 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number of passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



161,450.00 

6,499.60 

134,000.00 

5,394.52 

538,572.66 

21,681.67 

16,514.60 

664.84 

22,346.51 

15,425.21 

20,183.49 

4,758.28 

620.99 

812.54 

15,425.21 



620.99 



100.00 



Employees: Number — General officers, 3-; Office clerks, 1-; Enginemen, 1; Firemen, 1; Conductors' 
1; Other trainmen, 1; Section foremen 1; Other trackmen, 4; Total, 13. 
*Road went into the hand of a receiver January 18, 1927. 
Not operated during 1927 



54 



N. O. Corporation Commission 



CAROLINA AND NORTHEASTERN RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




W. C. Rawles _. _ 






H. 0. Carlton 






H. O. Carlton 






H. 0. Carlton... 











DIRECTORS 

W. C. Rawles, Richmond, Va.; Thos. B. Gay, Richmond, Va.; H. Stuart Lewis, Suffolk, Va.; A. 
Woolford, Suffolk, Va.; W. L. Long, Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized January 8th, 1917, under Laws of North Carolina; See Private Laws of North Carolina 



for 1917. 



ROAD OPERATED 





1926 


1927 


Gumberry, N. C. to Lasker, N. C. (miles) 


16 


16 






CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt. 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating Revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



1926 



300,000 

18,750 

199,000 

12,437 

412,371 

25,773 

21,822 

1,363 

27,137 

29,211 

21,930 

7,281 

1,825 

1,370 

28,971 

240 

1,810 

960 

15 



.03 
1,091.72 



1927 



300,000.00 

18,750.00 

199,000.00 

12,437.50 

412,371.44 

25,773.21 

20,822.35 

1,301.40 

27,074.61 

30,907.69 

30,986.28 

78.59 

1,931.73 

1,936.64 

30,803.39 

104.30 

1,925.21 

417 

6.52 



.03 

1,217.20 



Employees: Number — General officers, 5-5; Office clerks, 2-2; Station agents, 3-3; Enginemen, 1-1; 
Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-1; Machinists, 1-1; Section foremen, 2-2; Other trackmen, 6-6. Total, 
22-22. 



The Carolina Southern Railway Company 



55 



THE CAROLINA SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




S. Wade Marr___ 


Raleigh, N. C. 




J. W. Fox 


Windson, N. C. 




J. H. Matthews 


Windson, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

S. Wade Marr, Raleigh, N. C; J. W. Fox, Windsor, N. C; K. B. Coulter, Clifton Springs, N. Y.; 
J. H. Matthews, Windsor, N. C; John H. Small, Washington, D. C; J. 'C. Causey, Sedley, Va.; J. 
A. Pretlow, Franklin, Yet. 

HISTORY 
Organized April 1, 1926, under Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD operated 








1926 


1927 




22 3^ 


22^ 





CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1926 


1927 


Capital stock 


$ 150,000.00 
6,863.63 


$ 150,000.00 




6,666.66 


Funded debt.. 


11,800.00 


Funded debt, per mile _. 




524 . 44 


Cost of road 


150,000.00 
6,863.63 


55 , 700 . 00 


Cost of road, per mile __ 


2,475.55 


Cost of equipment _ . 




Cost of equipment, per mile 






Cost of road and equipment, per mile . „ __ 


6,863.63 

40,939.31 

40,204.67 

734.64 

1,860.86 

1,827.43 

36,012.31 

4,527.90 

818.92 

11,039 

280.14 

2,210.80 

1.28 

815.76 




Operating revenue _ 


61,682.42 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) ._ 


58,715.39 


Net operating revenue _ 


2,967.03 


Operating revenue, per mile 


2,741.44 


Operating expenses, per mile 


2,609.57 


Total freight revenue . 


57,678.81 


Total Passenger train service revenue 


403.01 


Freight revenue, per mile 


2,563.50 






Passenger service train revenue, per miie 




Revenue from other sources 


1 , 644 . 46 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile 




Taxes paid, North Carolina __ 


705 . 40 







Employees: Number — General officers, 1-1; Office clerks, 1-1; Station agents, 4-4; Other station men, 
1-1; Enginemen, 2-2; Firemen, 2-2; Conductors, 2-1; Other trainmen, 3-2; Machinists, 1-1; Other Shop- 
men, 2-; Section foremen, 3-2; Other trackmen, 8-8; Other employees, 1-2. Total, 29-27. 

Equipment, new standard-gauge tracks, stations, etc., now being contracted for. 



56 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



CLIFFSIDE RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






Cliffside, N. C. 






Cliffside, N. C. 






Cliffside, N. C. 






Cliffside, N. C. 










G. C. Shuford 


Cliffside, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

Chas. H. Haynes, Cliffside, N. C; Walter H. Haynes, Cliffside, N. C; Z .0. Jenkins, Cliffside, N. C. 
Virginia Haynes Caldwell, Cliffside, N. 0.J G. Haynes, Cliffside, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized in 1905 under Laws of North Carolina. 

ROAD OPERATED 




1927 



Cliffside, N. C. to West Henrietta and Avondale, N. C 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile '_ 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue, Est 

Passenger train revenue, per mile... 

Revenue from other sources (Express commissions, etc.) 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile (estimated) 

Taxes paid, N. C. Franchise, $60.00; State, $240.53; County, 
$425.46 



80,000 

16,000 

12,202 

2,440 

121,143 

24,228 

21,735 

4,347 

28,575 

35,248 

29,527 

5,720 

7,049 

5,905 

34,241 

47 

6,848 

500 

9 

959 



80,000.00 

16,000.00 

7,688.42 

1,537.68 

121,789.95 

24,357.99 

21,758.18 

4,351.63 

28,709.63 

33,383.11 

26,034.90 

7,348.21 

6,676.62 

5,206.98 

32,273.59 



6,454.71 



1,109.52 



Employees: Number — General officers, 4-4; Office clerks, 1-1; Station agents, 1-1; Enginemen, 2-2; 
Firemen, 2-2; Conductors, 1-1; Machinists, 1-1; Section foremen, 1-1; Other trackmen, 4-4. Total, 
17-17. 



Dover and Southbound Railroad Company 



57 



DOVER AND SOUTH BOUND RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




W. A. Wimsatt .... 


Washington, D. C. 






Dover, N. C. 




W. B. H. Blandford 


Dover, N. C. 






Dover, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

W. A. Wimsatt, W. K. Wimsatt, G. P. Lohr of Washington, D. C; D. W. Richardson, N. S. Richard- 
son, W. B. H. Blandford of Dover, N. C, T. D. Warren of New Bern, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized December 1, 1918, under Laws of North Carolina, Chapter 67 Private Laws 1905, Chapter 
59 Private Laws, 1907. 

ROAD OPERATED 




1927 



Dover, N. C. to Richlands, N. C. (miles) . 



24.75 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1926 


1927 


Capital stock 


$ 100,000.00 
4,040.40 


$ 100,000.00 




4 , 040 . 40 


Funded debt. _ _ _ 




Funded debt, per mile 








164,240.98 

6,636.00 

22,250.81 

899.00 

7,535.00 

34,426.66 

33,583.43 

843 . 23 

1,390.97 

1,356.89 

30,640.89 

1,296.17 

1,238.02 

2,332 

52.54 
2,489.60 


164,240.98 




6,636 00 




22,250 81 


Cost of equipment per mile . __ 


899.00 




7,535 00 




56,889 40 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 


44,737.52 




12,151 48 




2,298 56 


Operating expenses per mile _ 


1 , 807 . 57 


Total freight revenue 


56,217 25 


Total passenger train service revenue 


287 . 20 


Freight revenue, per mile 


2,271.25 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue 


550 


Passenger service train revenue, per mile 


11 60 


Revenue from other sources 


2,956.10 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile. _ _ 




Taxes paid, North Carolina 


2,482.25 


1,280 51 







Employees: Number — General officers, 3-3; Office clerks, 1-1; Station agents, 2-2; Other station men, 
1-1; Enginemen, 1-1; Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-1; Other trainmen, 1-1; Machinists, 3-3; Carpenters, 
1-1; Other shopmen, 1-1; Section foremen, 3-3; Other trackmen, 6-6. Total, 25-25. 



58 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



DURHAM AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




B. N. Duke 


New York, N. Y. 






Charlotte, N. C. 




T. B. Smith 


Durham, N. C. 




E. B. Hardin 

W. C. Parker 


Charlotte, N. C. 




New York, N. Y. 




J. M. Martin 








Greenville, S. C. 






Durham, N. C. 









DIRECTORS— 1927 

B. N. Duke, New York, N. Y.; E. Thomason, Charlotte, N. C; C. McD. Carr, Durham, N. C; J. S. 
Cobb, Durham, N. C; J. H. Erwin, Durham, N. C; W. A. Erwin, Durham, N. C; W. A. Erwin, Jr., 
Durham, N. C.J J. S. Hill, Durham, N. C.J R. L. Lindsay, Durham, N. C; J. B. Mason, Durham, 
N. C.J W. C. Parker, New York, N. Y.; H. C. Scatterfield, Durham, N. C.J C. C. Thomas, Durham, 
N. C; John F. Wiley, Durham, N. C. 



Organized January 13, 1904. 
amended March 10, 1905. 



HISTORY 

Chartered under Laws of North Carolina, Chapter 49, volume 1 and 



Durham and Southern Kaidway Company 59 

road operated 

1927 



East Durham, N. C. to Dunn, N. C. (miles) . 




56.87 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net Operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



1,350,000.00 

23,738.35 

1,450,764.94 



1,350,000.00 

23,738.35 

1,478,814.67 



132,207.72 



134,375. 



756,023.18 

477,526.55 

278,496.63 

12,820.47 

8,097.79 

724,180.66 

24,924.78 

12,280.49 

422.67 

17,923 

.03727 
49,800.00 



773,544.05 

442,596.44 

330,947.61 

13,117.59 

7,505.45 

746,014.71 

21,481.54 

12,650.75 

364.28 

17,326 

.03307 
58,550.00 



Employees (1926): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 8; Professional, clerical and 
general, 25; Maintenance of way and structures, 77; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 22; Trans- 
portation (other than train, engine and yard), 21; Transportation (train and engine service); 23. 
Total, 176. 

Employees (1927): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 7; Professional, clerical and 
general, 25; Maintenance of way and structures, 48; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 20; Trans- 
portation (other than train, engine and yard), 22; Transportation (train and engine service), 23; 
Total, 145. 






60 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



EAST CAROLINA RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Henry Clark Bridgers 

J. T. Hagans 


Tarboro, N. C. 




Tarboro, N. C. 




A. D. Fowlkes 


Tarboro, N. C. 




Henry Clark Bridgers 

Henry Clark, Bridgers 


Tarboro, N. C. 




Tarboro, N. C. 







DIRECTORS 

Henry Clark Bridgers, John L. Bridgers, A. D. Fowlkes and T. J. Hagans, Tarboro, N. C; B. 
Albritton, Hookerton, N. C. ; J. R. Davis and W. J. Turnage, Farmville, N. C. 



F. D 



HISTORY 

Organized July 1, 1898, under Laws of North Carolina; Public Laws of State of North Carolina 
Charter amended by private Laws of State of North Carolina ratified by General Assembly, March 11, 
1901, Chapter 362. 



East Carolina Kailway Company 



61 



ROAD OPERATED 








1926 


1927 




39.20 


39.20 


(Owned 38.20 trackage) 





CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1926 


1927 




$ 55,500.00 

1,452.88 

306,000.00 

8,010.47 

314,433.46 

8,231.24 

13,292.87 

347.99 

8,579.22 

179,330.10 

169,011.16 

10,318.94 

4,574.75 

4,311.51 

175,083.72 

1,576.63" 

4,466.42 

503 

40.22 

2,669.75 


5 55,500.00 




1,452.88 


Funded debt __ 


404,515.10 




10,589.40 




*4 14, 448. 56 




10,849.44 




13,292.87 




347.99 




11,197.43 




168,141.46 




150,246.77 




17,894.69 


**Operating revenue, per mile 


4,289.32 


♦♦Operating expenses per mile 


3,832.83 


Total freight revenue 


164,314.40 


Total passenger train service revenue 


968.71 


**Freight revenue, per mile 


4,191.69 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue 




Passenger service train revenue, per mile 




Revenue from other sources 


2,092.45 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile. 




Taxes paid, North Carolina 


5,951.60 


9,749.07 







Employees: Number — General officers, 4-4; Office clerks, 8-8; Station agents, 7-7; Other station men, 
1-1; Enginemen, 2-1; Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 2-2; Other trainmen, 3-3; Machinists, 1-1; Other Shop- 
men, 5-5; Section foremen, 4-4; Other trackmen, 17-17; Other employees, 1-1. Total 56-56. 
♦Based on owned mileage (38.20). 
♦♦Based on operated mileage (39.20) . 

Note. — Cost of equipment shown does not include cost of 3 steam locomotives, 2 passenger cars, 
3 passenger motors and 10 box cars which are leased. 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

EAST TENNESSEE AND WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA 
RAILROAD COMPANY 





OFFICERS— 1927 




Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Edgar P. Earle 






J. E. Vance. 



















Ario Pardee, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
A. G. B. Steel, Philadelphia, Pa.; 



DIRECTORS 

Edgar P. Earle, Philadelphia, Pa; J. H. Epps, Jonesboro, Tenn 
J. E. Vance, Johnson City, Tenn.; Henry Lewis, Philadelphia, Pa. 
H. W. Warden, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa. 

HISTORY 
Organized May 24, 1866, under Laws of Tennessee; Acts of Assembly 1865-1866, Sec. 23, by which 
the charter of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad became the charter of this Company. Re- 
organized May 22, 1879. 

ROAD OPERATED 



Johnson City, Tenn. to Cranberry, N. C. (miles) . 




CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, por mile . 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue , 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total Number passengers carried earning revenue. . 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 




Employees: Number — General officers, 5-4; Office clerks, 7-5; Station agents, 9-9; Other station men, 
21-8; Enginemen, 5-7; Firemen, 5-7; Conductors, 5-6; Other trainmen, 10-11; Machinists, 1-; Telegraph 
operators, 1-; Section foremen, 5-4; Other trackmen, 31-36; Other employes, 22-43. Total, 127-140. 



East. Tennessee and West. North Carolina Railroad Co. 63 
road operated in north carolina 

1927 



Cranberry, N. C. to N. C.-Tenn. line (miles). 




3.18 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



^Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



43,138.29 

13,565.50 

43,946.93 

13,819.79 

87,492.35 

27,513.32 

28,879.13 

9,081.49 

27,916.58 

18,781.30 

9,135.28 

8,778.80 

5,906.07 

23,154.29 

2,961.97 

7,595.69 

4,376 

931.44 

903.39 

.02649 

1,536.64 



43,138.29 
13,565.50 
43,946.93 
13,819.79 
88,935.82 
27,967.24 
28,988.49 

9,115.88 
30,228.39 
20,136.01 
10,092.38 

9,820.25 

6,332.08 
27,794.56 

2,595.29 

8 , 740 . 43 

3,497 
816.13 
839.55 
.03365 

1,636.43 



*Estimated on mileage basis. 



64 N. C. Corporation Commission 

ELKIN AND ALLEGHANY RAILROAD COMPANY 



OI 


?FICERS— 1926 




Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President _ 


H. G. Chatham 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 


General Manager 


J. P. Ipock 


Elkin, N. C. 


Secretary and Treasurer 




Elkin, N. C. 


Traffic Manager 


J. P. Ipock__ 


Elkin, N. C. 









H. G. Chatham, Winston-Salem, N. C 
R. L. Hubbard, A. G. Click, Elkin, N. C; A 
N. C; C. C. SmootJII, North Wilkesboro, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

G. T. Roth, Alex Chatham, J. F. Hendren, R. M. Chatham » 
A. Wruff, Cherry Lane, N. C; R. A. Daughton, Sparta» 



HISTORY 

Organized January 1, 1920, under Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 





1926 


1927 


Elkin, N. C. to Veneer, N. C. (miles) 


15 


15 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile _ 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) . 

Net operating revenue (taxes not included) 

Operating revenue, per mile. 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



56,000.00 
3,733.33 



45,000.00 
3,000.00 

13,225.83 

881.72 

3,881.72 

23,074.13 

18,173.18 
4,900.95 
1,538.28 
1,211.15 

22,806.13 



1,520.41 



268.00 
400.72 



Employees: Number — General officers, 3-; Station agents, 1-; Enginemen, 1-; Firemen, 1-; Conduc- 
tors, 1-; Section foremen, 1-; Other trackmen, 3-. Total, 11. 



Graham County Railroad Company 



65 



GRAHAM COUNTY RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




H. C. Bemis 


Bradford, Pa. 




H. C. Bemis 


Bradford, Pa. 






Robbinsville, N. C. 






Robbinsville, N. C. 




R. H. Montony 


Robbinsville, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

H. C. Bemis, Bradford, Pa.; E. R. Frederick, Robbinsville, N. C; S. W. Black, Bryson City, N. C; 
R. H. Montony, Robinsville, N. C; L. C. Bemis, Robbinsville, N. C.;L. A. Dindinger, Robbinsville, 
N. 0.; A. B. Anderson, Robbinsville, N. C; 

HISTORY 

Organized February 27, 1905, under Laws of North Carolina; Private Laws of North Carolina 
Session 1905, Pages 530 to 536 inclusive 



ROAD OPERATED 








N. C. 


Total 


Robbinsville, N. C. to Topton, N. C. (miles) 


12.13 


12.13 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1926 


1927 




$ 150,000.00 
12,366.03 


5 150,000 00 




12,366.03 


Funded debt . 




Funded debt, per mile 






Cost of road 


194,574.84 

16,040.79 

24,751.66 

2,040.53 

18.0S1.32 

31,557.34 

22,499.66 

9,057.68 

2,601.59 

1,854.87 

29,891.77 


198,970.84 


Cost of road, per mile 


16,403.20 


Cost of equipment 


24,751.66 


Cost of equipment, per mile 


2 , 040 . 53 


Cost of road and equipment, per mile 


18,443.73 




41,089 74 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not includad) 


36,669.98 




4,416.76 




3,387.45 




3,023.08 


Total freight revenue 


39,937.88 


Total passenger service revenue 




Freight revenue, per mile 


2,464.20 


3,292.49 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue 




Passenger service train revenue, per mile 






Revenue from other sources 


1,665.57 


5,520.50 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile 




Taxes paid, North Carolina 




1,558.25 









Employees: Number — General officers, -4; Office clerks, -1; Station agents, 1-1; Enginemen, 1-1 
Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-; Section foremen, 1-1; Other trackmen, 7-7. Total, 12-17. 



66 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



HIGH POINT, THOMASVILLE AND DENTON RAILROAD 

COMPANY 



OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




C. F. Tomlison . 


High Point, N. C. 
High Point, N. C. 










High Point, N. C. 


Traffic Manager, G. F. A.__ _ _ 


F. J. Flagler 


High Point, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

C. F. Tomlison, High Point, N. C; R. B. Terry, High Point, N. C; J. E. Millis, High Point, N. C. 
. A. Kirkman, High Point, N. C; T. J. Finch, Thomasville, N. C; B. I. Harrison, Denton, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized May 11, 1923, under Laws of North Carolina. 

ROAD OPERATED 



Total 



High Point, N. C. to High Rock, N. C. 




CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile... 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net Operating revenue. 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

♦Taxes paid, North Carolina 



213,930.00 
6,145.65 



215,840.00 
6,200.51 



330,268.00 

9,487.73 

92,835.96 

2,666.93 

12,154.66 

364,037.45 

277,707.91 

86,329.54 

10,457.84 

7,977.82 

354,244.68 

9,792.77 

10,176.52 

786 

281.31 

1,692.60 

.C3500 



410,082.03 

11,780.58 

99,847.95 

2,868.37 

14,648.95 

415,814.53 

322,520.25 

95,324.28 

11,946.12 

, 9,265.16 

407,534.82 

8,309.71 

11,707.41 

623 
2,387.16 
2,064.25 
.0310 



Employees: Number — General officers, 5-5; Office clerks, 15-15; Station agents, 3-4; Other station 
men, 5-10; Enginemen, 3-4; Firemen, 3-4; Conductors, 3-4; Other trainmen, 6-6; Machinists, 2-2; 
Carpenters, 2-2; Other shopmen, 10-10; Section Foremen, 6-7; Other trackmen, 52-42; Other employees, 
5-5. Total, 120-122. 

*($4,800 taxes included in operating expenses.) 



Kinston Carolina Railroad Company 



67 



KINSTON CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




G. R. Loyall. 

J. C. Poe 

M. S. Hawkins 

J. F. George 

J. F. Dalton ._ 


Norfolk, Va. 


Superintendent 


Kinston, N. C. 
Norfolk, Va. 




Norfolk, Va. 




Norfolk, Va. 









DIRECTORS 

G. R. Loyall, Norfolk, Va.; C. F. Harvey, Kinston, N. C; M. S. Hawkins, Norfolk, Va.; E. D. Kyle. 
Norfolk, Va. 

HISTORY 

Organized January 25th, 1910, under Laws of North Carolina; State of North Carolina — especially 
provisions of Section 1239-1240 and 1241 of Pell's Revisal of 1908 N. C. Page 641. 



ROAD OPERATED 








N. C. 


Total 


Kinston N. C. to Beulahville, N. C. (miles) 


30.47 


30.47 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC 





1926 


1927 


Capital stock . . _ ._ 


$ 35,000.00 
1,148.67 


$ 35 000 00 


Capital stock, per mile 


1 148 67 


Funded debt . 




Funded debt, per mile _ __ 






Cost of road . 


67,553.92 

2,217.06 

9,949.42 

326.53 

2,543.59 

41,904.31 

34,431.27 

7,473.04 

1,375.26 

1,130.00 

39,401.93 

2,220.38 

1,293.14 

395 

72.87 

282.00 

.03488 

2,794.70 


67 553 92 


Cost of road, per mile _ 


2,217.06 
10 221 17 


Cost of equipment 




335.45 

2,552.51 

27,162.25 

34,869.90 

7,707.65 

891.44 

1,144.40 

25,119.15 

1,970.69 

824.38 




Operating revenue 




Net operating revenue _____ 


Operating revenue, per mile 


Operating expenses, per mile 


Total freight revenue _ 


Total passenger train service revenue 


Freight revenue, per mile __ 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue _ 


Passenger service train revenue , per mile 


64.67 
62.41 


Revenue from other sources _ __ 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile _ __ __ 


Taxes paid, North Carolina 


2,407.59 





Employees: Number — General officers, 5-5; Office clerks, 2-2; Station agents, 2-2; Other Station men, 
1-1 ; Enginemen, 1-1; Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-1; Other trainmen, 1-1; Other Shopmen, 2-2; Section 
foremen, 2-2; Other trackmen, 8-8. Total, 26-26. 



N. 0. Corporation Commission 



LAURINBURG AND SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






Laurinburg, N. C. 
Laurinburg, N. C. 
Laurinburg, N. C. 




Jas. L. McNair 




C. E. Reman 




Z. V. Pate 






Laurinburg, N. C. 
Laurinburg, N. C. 




J. W. Hollis 







DIRECTORS 

John F. McNair, Laurinburg, N. C; John Blue, Laurinburg, N. C; N. G. Wade, Jacksonville, Fla. 
A. A. James, Laurinburg, N. C; D. M. Flynn, Jacksonville, Fla.; A. M. Fairley, Laurinburg, N. C. 
Jas. L. McNair, Laurinburg, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized March 8, 1909 under Laws of North Carolina; Private Laws, 1909. 



ROAD OPERATED 








N. C. 


Total 


Johns, N. C. to Raeford, N. C. (miles) 


30 


30 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 




1927 



Capital stock - 

Capital stock, per mile — 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile... 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue. -- 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue - 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile — 

Total freight revenue * 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning reveue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina _ 



225,000.00 

7,500.00 

75,000.00 

2,500.00 

335,889.09 

11,862.97 

61,812.49 

2,060.41 

13,923.39 

157,163.50 

132,264.33 

24,899.17 

5,238.78 

4,408.81 

146,913.87 

1,038.40 

4,897.13 

2,308 

34.61 

9,211.23 

.015 

5,181.48 



225,000.00 

7,500.00 

75,000.00 

2,500.00 

356,102.07 

11,870.07 

61,812.49 

2,060.41 

13,930.48 

133,373.85 

112,728.98 

20,644.87 

4 , 445 . 79 

3,757.63 

127,586.82 

1,046.38 

4,252.89 

2,275 

34.88 

4 , 740 . 55 

.015 

5,180.77 



Employees: Number — General officers, 6-6; Office clerks, 1-1; Station agents, 3-3; Other station men, 
-33; Enginemen, 2-2; Firemen, 2-2; Conductors: 2-2; Section foremen, 3-3; Other trackmen, 21-21. 
Total, 45-45. 



Lawndalb Railway and Industrial Company 



69 



LAWNDALE RAILWAY AND INDUSTRIAL COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




John F. Schenck, Sr 


Lawndale, N. C. 




H. E. Schenck 


Lawndale, N. C. 






Shelby, N. C. 




John F. Schenck, Sr 


Lawndale, N. C. 






Lawndale, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

George W. Mangum, 70 Thomas St., New York, N. Y.; F. C. Reynolds, 70 Thomas St., New York, 
N. Y.; John F. Schenck, Sr., Lawndale, N. C; Hal E. Schenck, Lawndale, N. C; John F. Schenck, Jr., 
Shelby, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized January 10, 1888, under Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 








N. C. 


Total 


Lawndale, N. C. to Shelby, N. C. (miles _ 


11.05 


11.05 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1926 


1927 


Capital stock 


$ 60,000.00 
6,465.52 


$ 60,000.00 
6 465 52 


Capital stock, per mile 


Funded debt _ __ __ 




Funded debt, per mile 






Cost of road and equipment 


79,664.71 
8,584.47 


79,664.71 
8,584.47 


Cost of road, per mile 


Cost of equipment 


Cost of equipment, per mile 






Cost of road and equipment, per mile 






Operating revenue 


22,015.70 

19,159.40 

2,856.30 

1,992.37 

1,733.89 

22,013.70 

2.00 

1,992.19 

no record 

.18 


20 103 79 


Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included) 


18,052.98 
2,050.81 
1,819.35 
1,633.75 

20,103.79 


Net operating revenue 


Net operating revenue, per mile 


Operating expenses, per mile 


Total freight revenue 


Total passenger train service revenue 


Freight revenue, per mile 


1 819 35 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue 




Passenger service train revenue, per mile 




Revenue from other sources 




Average receipts per passenger, per mile 


no record 

464.56 




Taxes paid, North Carolina 


531.04 





Employees: Number — General officers, 3-3; Office clerks, 1-1; Station agents, 2-2; Enginemen, 1-1; 
Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-1; Other trainmen, 2-2; Machinists, 1-1; Carpenters, 2-2; Section foremen, 
1-1; Other trackmen, 4-4. Total, 19-19. 

We own 9.28 miles and use 1.77 miles Seabord Air Line Railway Company's track making 11.05 
miles operated. 



70 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



LINVILLE RIVER RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Edgar P. Earle 








Johnson City, Tenn. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 











DIRECTORS 

Edgar P. Earle, Philadelphia, Pa.; J. E. Vance, Johnson City, Tenn.; Ario Pardee, Philadelphia, Pa. 
J, H. Epps, Jonesboro, Tenn.; Henry Lewis, Philadelphia, Pa.; D. W. Mackie, Cranberry, N. C. 
A. G. B. Steel, Philadelphia, Pa.; H. W. Warden, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa. 

HISTORY 

Organized August 1, 1899, under Laws of North Carolina. 

ROAD OPERATED 





N. C. 


Total 




34.79 


34 79 













CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road. 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue. _ 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



450,000.00 
15,934.75 



450,000.00 
12,934.75 



533,102.18 

15,323.43 

85,780.48 

2,465.66 

17,789.09 

109,838.59 

109,173.33 

665.26 

3,157.18 

3,138.06 

91,283.17 

16,916.17 

2,623.83 

29,708 

486.23 

3,231.76 

.02780 

4,873.21 



535,892.94 
15,403.65 
85,780.48 

2,465.66 

17,869.31 

103,580.58 

80,965.90 

22,614.68 

2,977.31 

2,327.28 
86,346.01 
15,386.74 

2,481.92 
33,542 
44,227 

1,847.83 
.03494 

5,543.02 



Employees: Number — General Officers, 5-2; Office Clerks, 2-1; Station agents, 6-6; Enginemen, 2-; 
Firemen, 2-; Conductors, 2-; Other trainmen, 4-; Machinists, 1-1; Carpenters, 1-1; Other shopmen, -1; 
Telegraph operators, 1-; Section foremen, 5-4; Other trackmen, 26-21; Other employees, -2; Total, 
56-39. 

Included in returns of East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad Company. 



Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company 



71 



LOUISVILLE AND NASHVILLE RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


W. R. Cole 






G. E. Evans 


Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 




T. E. Brooks. 




J.C.Michael 




E. S. Locke 




A. J. Pharr 




W. A. Northcutt 







DIRECTORS 

F. B. Adams, New York; Lyman Delano, Wilmington; George B. Elliott, Wilmington,; James B. 
Brown, Louisville; George C. Jankins, Baltimore; J. R. Kenly, Wilmington, N. C.;J. J. Nelligan, 
Baltimore; Edward W. Sheldon, New York; Frederick W. Scott, Richmond, Va.; Henry Walters, 
New York; John I. Waterbury, New York; E. L. Smithers, New York. 



HISTORY 

Organized March 5, 1850, under Laws of Kentucky. Acts of Kentucky Legislature, approved March 
5, 1850 (Acts 1849-50, p. 427), and numerous amendments 



72 



N. G. Corporation Commission 

ROAD OPERATED— ENTIRE LINE 





1926 


1927 




5,034.08 

519.77 

8,339.12 

4,982.70 


5,069.21 
550 31 




Total trackage 


8,407 90 


Length of road owned 


4,987 51 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 




1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expense 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile _ 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger train service revenue, per mile 

Total number of passengers carried earning revenue 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, i 



$117 

241 

275 

141 

147, 

112, 

34, 



116 
27 



000.000.00 
23,481.24 

455,435.00 
48,458.75 

268,331.77 
55,244.83 

724,774.01 
28,443.37 

136,530.46 

452,390.80 

674,139.66 
29,204.13 
22,321.90 

617,328.54 

489,662.09 

23,146.58 

5,456.24 

723,697 

.03339 

927,641.78 



117,000 

23 

239,192 

47 

283,135 

56 

144,585 

28, 

144,605, 

112,857, 

31,747. 

28, 

22, 

116,384, 

25,324, 

22, 

5, 

9,438, 



000.00 
450.77 
520.00 
958.34 
293.65 
768.86 
626.17 
989.34 
117.23 
834.65 
282.58 
553.09 
284.41 
471.83 
600.23 
980.76 
000.48 



.3294 
7,639,855.29 



Employees (1926): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 272; Professional, clerical and 
general, 6,867; Maintenance of way and structures, 13,961; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 
17,500; Transportation (other than train, engine and yard), 4,835; Transportation (yardmasters, 
switch tenders and hostlers), 565; Transportation (train and engine service), 9,049. Total, 53,049. 

Employees (1927): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 262; Professional, clerical and 
general, 6,776; Maintenance of way and structures, 13,275; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 
17,473; Transportation (other than train, engine and yard), 4,757; Transportation (yardmasters, 
switchtenders, hostlers), 530; Transportation (train and engine service), 8,628. Total, 51701. 



Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company 
road operated— north carolina 



73 




1927 



Georgia-North Carolina State Line to Murphy (miles). 



13.2 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 




1927 



♦Capital Stock 

♦Capital Stock, per mile 

•Funded debt 

•Funded debt per mile 

•Cost of road _ 

•Cost of road, per mile _ 

•Cost of equipment __. 

•Cost of equipment, per mile 

•Operating revenue 

•Operating expenses 

•Net operating revenue 

•Operating Revenue, per mile 

•Operating expenses, per mile 

•Total Freight revenue 

•Total passenger train service revenue 

•Freight revenue, per mile 

•Passenger train service revenue, per mile__ 

•Total number of passengers carried earning revenue 

Average receipts per passenger per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina _ 



309,952,36 

23,481,24 

639,655.50 

48,458.75 

729,231.75 

55,244.83 

375,452.48 

28,443.37 

39,401.30 

63,007.68 

t23,606.38 

2,984.95 

4,773.31 

24,779.16 

13,439.54 

1,877.21 

1,018.15 

27,328 

.03464 
10,122.23 



309,550.16 

23,450.77 

633,050.08 

47,958.34 

749,348.95 

56,768.86 

382,659.28 

28,989.34 

39,393.41 

69,682.28 

t30,288.87 

2,984.35 

5,278.96 

27,473.73 

10,653.31 

2,081.34 

807.07 

23,334 

.03427 

9,099.85 



•Estimated on mileage basis. 
tDeficit. 



74 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



MAXTON, ALMA AND SOUTHBOUND RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




H. A. McKinnon 


Maxton, N. C 






Rowland, N. C. 




A. J. McKinnon 


Maxton, N. C 




C. J. Cottingham j__ 


Alma, N. C. 






Rowland, N. C 









DIRECTORS 

H. A. McKinnon, Maxton, N. C; J. W. Ward, Rowland, N. C; A. J. McKinnon, Macton, N. C; 
L. Z. Hedgepeth, Rowland, N. C; C. J. Cottingham, Alma, N. C; G. M. Pate, Rowland, N. C; R. L. 
McLeod, Maxton, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized May, 1911, under Laws of North Carolina. Private Laws of North Carolina Sessio i 
1911, Chapter 86, Page 199 to 208, inclusive. 



ROAD OPERATED 








N. C. 


Total 




15.15 


15.15 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number of passengers carried earning revenue. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina. 



75,000.00 
4,950.00 



75,000.00 
4,950.00 



156,799.27 

10,349.79 

29,812.29 

1,967.80 

12,317.59 

22,978.55 

20,719.09 

2,259.46 

1,516.73 

1 , 367 . 59 

20,396.70 

1,760.09 

1,346.31 

1,640 

116.17 

821.76 

.0370 

1,313.78 



120,258.77 

7,937.88 

29,812.29 

1,967.80 

9,905.68 

20,606.52 

18,189.09 

2,417.43 

1,360.16 

1,200.60 

19,007.68 

1,425.34 

1,247.99 

1,003 

96.08 

173.50 

.0365 

1,302.77 



Employees: Number — General officers, 1-1; Office clerks, 2-2; Station agents, 2-3; Other Station 
men, 1-1; Enginemen, 1-1; Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-1; Other trainmen, 2-; Machinists, 1-1; 
Other shopmen, 1; Section Foremen, 1-1; Other trackmen, 4-4; Total 17-17. 



Moore Central Railway Company 



75 



MOORE CENTRAL RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 



Name 



Official Address 



President 

General Manager or Superintendent. 
Secretary and Treasurer 



J. C. Hurley. __ 
M. H. Birkhead 
Arthur Ross 



Troy, N. C. 
Asheboro, N. C. 
Asheboro, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

J. C. Hurley, Troy, N. C; J. M. Brown, Hemp, N. C; Arthur Ross, Asheboro, N. C; Frank Hurley, 



Troy, N. C. 



HISTORY 



Organized October 12, 1924, under Laws of North Carolina, Section 1223 Consolidated Statutes of 
North Carolina 

ROAD OPERATED 



N. C. Total 



Carthage, N. C. to McConnell, N. C. (not operated). 
Cameron N. C. to Carthage, N. C. (operated) 



10.107 
11.197 



10.107 
11.197 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



75,000.00 
3,520.46 



40,023.45 

1,879.03 

4,607.00 

216.29 

2,095.32 

33,814.96 

30,190.38 

3,624.58 

3,019.19 

2,659.56 

31,068.05 

30.43 

2,773.93 

85 

2.72 

2,716.48 

.36 

537.07 



75,000.00 
3,520.46 



40,065.70 

1,880.66 

4,564.75 

214.26 

2,094.93 

26,991.24 

28,336.46 

1,345.22 

2,410.57 

2,530.71 

23,759.18 

56.77 

2,121.92 

184 

5.07 

3,175.29 

.26 

545.95 



Employees: Number — General officers, 4-5; Office clerks, 1-1; Station agents, 2-2; Enginemen, 1-1; 
Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-1; Other trainmen, 1; Other shopmen, 1-; Telegraph operators, 1; Section 
foremen, 1-1; Other trackmen, 4-4. Total, 16-18. 



76 



H. C. Corporation Commission 



PIEDMONT AND NORTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


W. S. Lee __ . 


Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 


Vice-President 


N. A. Cocke _._ 

E. Thomason 

J. C. McGowan 

N. A. Cocke 

W. S. O'B. Robinson, 
Jr 


Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 




Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 




Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 




Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 


General Solicitor 






Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 


Auditor 


E. B. Hardin 

E. Thomason 

A D. Frye_- 


Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 




Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 




Greenville, S. C. 




J. S. Cureton 


Greenville, S. C. 







DIRECTORS— 1927 

G. G. Allen, 535 5th Ave., New York, N. Y.; W. S. Lee, Charlotte, N. C.j E. Thomason, Charlotte; 
N. C; S. W. Cramer, Charlotte, N. C; C. A. Canon, Concord, N. C; W. S. Montgomery, Spartan- 
burg, S. C; V. M. Montgomery, Spartanburg, S C; A. W. Smith, Greenville, S. C; John A. Law, 
Spartanburg, S. C; C. E. Hutchison, Mount Holly. N. C; E. A. Smythe, Greenville, S. C; W. E. 
Beattie, Greenville, S. C; B. B. Gossett. Charlotte, N. C; J. A. Law, Spartanburg, S. C; J. T. 
Woodside, Greenville, S. C; J. P. Gossett, Williamston, S. C; L. D. Blake, Belton, S. C; J. C. Self, 
Greenwood, S. C; E. F. Green, Boston, Mass.; J. W. Arrington, Greenville, S. C; A. F. McKissich, 
Greenville, S. C; B. E. Geer, Greenville, S. C; J. H. Separk, Gastonia, N. C; C. C.Armstrong, 
Gastonia, N. C. 

HISTORY 

1913. Greenville, Spartanburg and Anderson Railway Corn- 



March 10, 1910, amend- 



Date of organization, November 17, 
pany, chartered under chapter L of the Code of Laws of South Carolina, 1902. 
May 9, 1911, and February 20, 1910. 

Piedmont Traction Company, chartered under the Laws of North Carolina, Revisal of 1905, amend- 
ed February 9 1914. 

The properties of the above-named companies were purchased by the Piedmont and Northern Rail- 
way Company, in accordance with a resolution of the stockholders of the Piedmont Traction Com- 
pany, April 25, 1914, and of the Greenville, Spartanburg and Anderxon Railway Company, April 24, 
1914, and of the Piedmont and Northern Railway Company, May 18, 1914, 



Piedmont and Northern Railway Company 



77 



ROAD OPERATED 




1927 



Main Line and Branches (miles) 

Under trackage rights 

Length of road owned 



160.27 

14.59 

160.27 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded Debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net Operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger train service revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid 



8,584,600.00 

53,593.45 

6,279,400.00 

39,202.14 

16,197,912.12 

101,123.19 

2,621,716.35 

1,511,145.79 

1,110,570.56 

15,063.00 

8,682.25 

2,288,091.98 

179,654.03 

13,146.17 

1,031.68 

409,401 



8,584 

53 

6,279 

39 

16,291 

101 

2,658 

1,537 

1,121 

15 

8 

2,340 

166 

13 

345 



600.00 
563.35 
400.00 
,180.13 
,314.41 
,459.98 
010.08 
,000.93 
,009.15 
,200.79 
,789.89 
809.58 
,168.46 
386.76 
950.29 
863 



265,996.00 



241,710.12 



Employees (1926): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 11; Professional, clerical and 
general, 57; Maintenance of way and structures, 141; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 81; Power 
16; Transportation, 230. Total 536. 

Employees (1927): Number — Executives, officials and staff assistants, 10; Professional, clerical and 
general, 57; Maintenance of way and structures, 134; Maintenance of equipment and stores, 92; Power, 
16; Transportation, 232. Total, 541. 



78 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

ROAD OPERATED— NORTH CAROLINA 




1927 



Main line and branches (miles) 

Under trackage rights 

Length of road owned 



40.79 

4.68 

40.79 



♦CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 




1927 



♦Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger train service revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



$ 2 



186 

53 

1,599 

39 

4,124 

101 

614 

354 

260 

15 

8 

536 

42 

13 

102 



076.82 
593.45 
055.29 
202.14 
814.92 
123.19 
419.77 
,148.97 
270.80 
063.00 
,682.25 
232.27 
,082.22 
,146.17 
031.68 
,350 



2,184, 

53, 

1,598, 

39, 

4,138, 

101, 

620, 

358, 

261, 

15, 

8, 

546, 

38, 

13, 



849.04 
563.35 
157.52 
180.13 
552.58 
459.98 
015.75 
539.61 
476.14 
200.79 
798.89 
045.94 
762.32 
386.76 
950.29 
466 



41,357.48 



32,545.34 



♦Estimated on mileage basis. 



Pigeon River Railway Company 



79 



PIGEON RIVER RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




E. A. Gaskill . 




General Manager or Superintendent 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Traffic Manager 




Ela, N. C. 


E. A. Oblinger 


New York, N. Y. 


J. A. Sisk .- .- 


Ela, N. C. 







DIRECTORS 

E. A. Gaskill, Waynesville, N. C.; E. A. Oblinger, New York, N. Y.; E. M. Bechtel, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; F. H. Ely, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. Williams, Philadelphia, Pa.; K. J. Wenz, Canton, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized November 2, 1906, under Laws of North Carolina; Chapter 61 "Railroads", Vol. 1, 
Revisal of 1905 of North Carolina. 

ROAD OPERATED 




1927 



West Canton, N. C. to Sunburst, N. C. (miles). 



11.07 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 




1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue (Loss) 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes Paid, North Carolina 



40,000.00 

2,675.58 

77,000.00 

5,150.50 

330,686.24 

22,119.47 

5,000.00 

334.44 

22,453.91 

8,235.88 

10,334.39 

2,098.51 

140.36 

684 . 56 

7,799.74 

223.69 

521.71 

817 

14.96 

119.49 

.0366 

141.24 



40 


000.00 


3 


369 


83 


77 


000 


00 


6 


495 


35 


>62 


691 


48 


22 


130 


70 


5 


000 


00 




421 


23 


22 


551 


93 


20 


778 


54 


37 


071 


78 


16 


293 


24 


1 


750 


50 


3 


123 


15 


19 


232 


01 




702 


48 


1 


620 


22 


2 


341 






63 


45 




573 


53 




.0333 




606 


75 



Employees: Number — General officers, 4-3; Office clerks, 1-1; Station Agents, 3-1; Other station 
men, 1-0; Enginemen, 1-; Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-1; Other trainmen, 1-0; Machinist, 0-0; Car- 
penters, 0-0; Other Shopmen, 0-0; Telegraph Operators, 0-0; Section Foremen, 1-1; Other trackmen, 
4-6. Total, 17-15. 

*Operated October 1 to December 31, 1926; Other nine months of year operated by Tennessee 
and North Carolina Railway under lease, 



80 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



RALEIGH AND CHARLESTON RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


L. R. Powell, Jr 


Norfolk, Va. 


General Manager or Superintendent 






T. W. Mathews.. 


Norfolk, Va. 









DIRECTORS 

K. M. Biggs, Lumberton, N. C; F. Sitterding, Richmond, Va.; C. R. Capps, Norfolk, Va.; R. S- 
Small, Charleston, S. C; A. P. McAllister, Lumberton, N. C; W. Stackhouse, Marion, S. C; Robt- 
L. Nutt, New York, N. Y.; D. G. Towles, Meggets, S. C; L. R. Powell, Jr.; Norfolk, Va. 



HISTORY 



Organized December 5, 1905. 



ROAD OPERATED 








N. C. 


Total 




21.24 


42.58 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue — 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



574,500.00 


$ 574,500.00 


13,492.25 


13,492.25 


550,000.00 


550,000.00 


12,916.86 


12,916.86 


1,096,692.21 


1,097,373.31 


25,756.04 


25,772.04 


19,214.06 


19,214.06 


451.25 


451.25 


26,207.29 


26,223.29 


131,549.34 


138,421.89 


101,048.49 


114,535.43 


30,500.85 


23,886.46 


3,089.46 


3,250.87 


2,373.14 


2,689.89 


119,324.20 


128,720.48 


10,153.13 


8,485.24 


2,802.35 


3,023.03 


16,207 


12,093 


238.45 


199.28 


2,072.01 


1,064.52 


.036 


.036 


3,796.97 


4,189.05 



Employees: Number — General officers, 1-1; Office clerks, 2-2; Station Agents, 8-8; Other station 
men, 3-3; Enginemen, 2-2; Firemen, 2-2; Conductors, 2-2; Other trainmen, 3-3; Carpenters, 6-7; Other 
shopmen, 4-4; Telegraph operators, 1-1; Section foremen, 4-4; Other Trackmen, 14-15; Total, 52-54. 



Raleigh and North Carolina Railroad Company 
road operated in north carolina 



81 




1927 



Lumberton, N. C. to N. C.-S. C. Line (miles). 



21.24 



♦CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina.. 



287,250.00 

13,492.25 

275,000.00 

12,916.86 

548,346.10 

25,756.04 

9,607.03 

451.25 

26,207.29 

65,774.67 

50,524.25 

15,250.42 

3,089.46 

2,273.14 

59,662.10 

5,076.57 

2,802.35 

8,104 

238.45 

1,036.00 

.036 

3,796.97 



287,250.00 

13,492.25 

275,000.00 

12,916.86 

548,686.65 

25,772.04 

9,607.03 

451.25 

26,223.29 

69,210.95 

57,267.72 

11,943.23 

3,250.87 

2,689.89 

64,360.24 

8,485.24 

3,023.03 

6,046 

199.28 

532.26 

.036 

4,189.05 



•Estimated on mileage basis. 



82 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



ROCKINGHAM RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




H. C. Wall... 




General Superintendent 








Rockingham, N. C 







DIRECTORS 

William Entwistle, Rockingham, N. C; W. L. Parsons, Rockingham, N. C; Jno. L. Everett, Rock- 
ingham, N. C.;F. W. Leak, Rockingham, N. C; H. C. Wall, Rockingham, N C; J. LeGrand Everett, 
Rockingham, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized 1910, under the Laws of North Carolina, 



ROAD OPERATED 



Ledbetter, N. C. (formerly Leak, N. C.) to Gibson, N. C.(miles). 




Total 



21.4 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



72,000. 

3,364. 

250,000. 

11,682. 

324,349. 

15,156. 

18,863. 

881. 

16,182. 

68,754. 

67,654. 

1,099. 

3,212. 

3,161. 

68,401. 

353. 

3,196. 

592 



00 

48 
00 
24 
47 
51 
04 
45 
48 
71 
87 
84 
83 
44 
54 
17 
33 

.39 



3.94 

4,118.40 



72,000.00 

3,364.48 

250,000.00 

11,682.24 

328,379.74 

15,344.85 

18,863.04 

881.45 

16,226.29 

73,546.86 

67,465.85 

6,081.01 

3,436.76 

3,152.60 

73,282.35 

264.51 

3,424.40 

421 

14.70 



3.5 
2,745.60 



Employees: Number — General officers, 3-3; Office clerks, 2-3; Station agents, 2-2; Other Station 
men, 1-2; Enginemen, 1-1; Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-1; Other Trainmen, 2-2; Machinists, 1-1; 
Other shopmen, 2-1; Section foremen, 2-2; Other trackmen, 12-10; Other employees, 3. Total, 30-32 



Smoky Mountain Railway Company 



83 



SMOKY MOUNTAIN RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1926 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




W M. Ritter__ 






E. B. McCollum .___ _ 


Proctor, N. C. 










W. E. Weakley __ ._ 











DIRECTORS 

W. M. Ritter, Columbus, Ohio; Jas. L. Hamill, Columbus, Ohio; C. B. Weakley, Columbus, Ohio; 
Landon C. Bell, Columbus, Ohio; R. E. Pendleton, Columbus, Ohio. 

HISTORY 

Organized August 2nd, 1905 under Laws of North Carolina; Private Laws of North Carolina, 1909 
Chapter 151 Charter amended by act ratified February 26, 1909. 



ROAD OPERATED 






» 


N. C. 


Total 


Ritter, N. C. to Proctor, N. C. (miles) __ _ . _ ___ 


9.6 


9.6 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1926 


1927 




$ 50,000.00 

5,208.33 

23,000.00 

2,395.83 

120.06 

12.50 

1,580.55 

164.64 

177.15 

18,867.95 

18,750.93 

117.02 

1,965.41 

1,953.22 

18,651.70 

216.25 

1,942.88 

958 

22.53 

61.18 

.053 

848.27 


$ 50 , 000 . 00 




5,208.33 




23,000.00 




2,395.83 




120.06 




12.50 




1 , 580 . 55 




164.64 




177.15 


Operating revenue. _ _ _ _ 


7,449.55 


Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included) 


2,119.37 


Net operating revenue _ . _______ 


5,330.18 


Operating revenue, per mile _ _ _ 


776.00 


Operating expenses, per mile. _____ ____ 


220.76 


Total freight revenue ____ __ 


7,375.45 


Total passenger train service revenue 


74.10 


Freight revenue, per mile__ _ ___ 


768.27 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue 


458 
7.72 


Revenue from other sources- __ _ _ 


67.12 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile __ __ ____ 


.038 


Taxes paid, North Carolina _ 









Employees: Number — General officers, 2- 
men, 1-; Conductors, 1-; Section foremen, 1- 



Office clerks, 4-; Station agents, 2-; Enginemen, 1-; Fire- 
; Other trackmen, 4-; Other employees, 1-; Total, 17. 



84 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



TENNESSEE AND NORTH CAROLINA RAILWAY 
COMPANY 





OFFICERS 




Title 


Name 


Official Address 




C. Boice 

H. S. Mantooth. - - 


Newport, Tenn. 


General Superintendent 




J. W. Bell 






F. W. Moorehead.. 









DIRECTORS 

C. Boice. Newport, Tenn.; J. W. Bell, Abingdon, Va.; F. W. Moorehead, Hartford, Tenn.; H. S- 
Mantooth, Newport, Tenn.; F. E. Allen, Waynesville, N. C; D. L. Boyd, Waynesville, N. C; D. R. 
Noland, Crabtree, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized June 28, 1920, under Laws of Tennessee and North Carolina; North Carolina General 
Assembly Act March 6, 1902; General Laws of Tennessee. 



ROAD OPERATED 





1926 


1927 


Newport, Tenn. to Crestmont, N. C. (miles) 

West Canton, N. C. to Spruce, N. C. (miles) 


22.16 

14.95 


19.75 




30 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital Stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile. 



$ 250,000.00 
12,400.00 



224,625.80 

11,142.15 

24,636.07 

1,222.02 

12,364.17 



250,000.00 
12,400.00 



225.0S9.01 

11,396.91 

28,256.00 

1,430.68 

12.827.59 



Employees: Number — General officers, 4-4; Office clerks, 2-3; Station agents, 5-5; Other station 
men, 0-3; Enginemen, 2-3; Firemen, 2-2; Conductors, 2-3; Other trainmen, 4-4; Machinists, 0-1; Car- 
penters, 0-1; Other shopmen, 1-2; Telegraph operators,0-0; Section Foremen, 4-5; Other trackmen, 
16-28; Other employees, 1-2. Total, 43-66. 
*Operated but not owned. 



Tennessee and North Carolina Railway Company 
road operated in north carolina 



83 




Total 



Cresmont, N. C. to N. C.-Tenn. Line (miles). 



2.5 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



♦Capital stock 

♦Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt. 

Funded debt, per mile 

*Coat of road 

*Cost of road, per mile 

*Cost of equipment 

*Cost of equipment, per mile 

*Operating Revenue _ 

""Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included). 

*Net operating revenue 

*Operating revenue, per mile 

♦Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

♦Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

*Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

♦Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



31,000.00 
12,400.00 



27,855.38 

11,142.15 

3,055.05 

1,222.02 

33,732.93 

22,982.63 

750.30 

2,114.91 

2,067.87 

30,063.62 

3,100.09 

1,884.86 

6,158 

1240.03 

1,814.88 

.03 

423.69 



31,000.00 
12,400.00 



28,492.27 

11,396.91 

3,576.70 

1.430.68 

6,405.35 

5,952.44 

452.91 

2,562.14 

2,380.97 

5,166.10 

1,006.27 

2,066.44 

2,361 

402.50 

232.80 

.043 

67.75 



♦Estimated on mileage basis. 



86 



N. C. Corporation Commission 
TOWNSVILLE RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


J. R. Paschall 








Townsville, N. C. 


Secretary and Treasurer 


R. B. Taylor 


Townsville, N. C. 




W. J. Talley _ 











DIRECTORS 

J. R. Paschall, Merry Mount, N. C; J. A. Boyd, Townsville, N. C; C. S. Taylor, Townsville, N C. 
E. M. Tharpe, Townsend, Ga.; S. R. Adams, Townsville, N. C; J. E. Kimball, Townsville, N. C. 
R. B. Taylor, Townsville, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized July 2, 1919 under Laws of North Carolina; Revisal of 1905. Section 2548. 

ROAD OPERATED 





1926 


1927 


Townsville, N. C. to Manson, N. C. (miles) 


11.38 


10.5 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt _. 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile _.. 

Cost of equipment — 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid. North Carolina 



240,000.00 
21,089.63 
22,500.00 

1,977.15 

254,348.04 

22,350.44 

26,079.10 

2,287.25 

24,637.69 

15,075.04 

15,774.62 

699.58 

1,324.69 

1,386.17 
14,370.79 



1,262.81 



704.25 



796.58 



240,000.00 

22,857.14 

22,500.00 

2,142.85 

254,348.04 

24,223.62 

26,144.29 

2,489.93 

208,492.23 

13,941.58 

13,802.55 

139.03 

1,327.77 

1,314.13 

13,275.40 



1,264.32 



666.18 
729.19 



Employees: Number — General officers, 4-4; Office clerks, 1-1; Station agents, 2-2; Enginemen, 1-1 ; 
Firemen, 1-1; Other trainmen, 1-1; Section foremen, 1-1; Other trackmen, 4-3. Total, 16-14. 



TUCKASEEGEE AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 



87 



TUCKASEEGEE AND SOUTHEASTERN RAILWAY 
COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






Washington, D. C. 




James E. Walker 


East LaPorte, N. C. 




N. M. Davidson 


East LaPorte, N. C. 




James E. Walker 


East LaPorte, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

Joseph Keys, Washington, D. C; N. M. Davidson, East LaPorte, N. C; James E. Walker, East 
LaPorte, N. C; H. W. Shields, Bluefield, W. Va.; M. L Harrison, East Ladford, Va.; V. R. Rieley, 
East LaPorte, N. C. 

HISTORY 
Organized June 7, 1922, under Laws of North Carolina; Consolidated Statutes North Carolina. 
Chapter 33-66. 

ROAD OPERATED 



1927 



Sylva, N. C. to East LaPorte, N. C. (miles). 




12.26 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating Revenue 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number of passengers carried earning revenue. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



300,000.00 
24,469.82 



308,799.45 
25,187.55 
42,539.42 

3,469.77 
28,657.32 
99,755.58 
84,834.81 
14,920.77 

8,136.67 

6,919.66 

99,120.72 

634,86 

8,084.88 

1,587 
51.78 



300,000.00 

24,469.82 

15,000.00 

1,223.49 

348,207.27 

28,401.89 

42,539.42 

3,469.77 

31,871.67 

101,574.13 

93,869.69 

7,704.44 

8,285.00 

7,656.58 

101,574.13 



8,285.00 



.032 
718.73 



419.70 



Employees: Number — General Officers, 4-5; Office clerks, 1-0; Station agents, 1-1; Other station 
men, 2-0; Enginemen, 1-1; Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-1; Other Trainmen, 2-2; Machinists, 1-1; 
Other shopmen, 3-5; Section foremen, 2-2; Other trackmen, 13-11; Total 32-30. 
Three months. 



88 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



VIRGINIA AND CAROLINA SOUTHERN RAILROAD 
COMPANY 



OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


A. T. McLean 




First Vice-President 






Vice-President in Charge of Traffic 


J. Q. Beckwith 











DIRECTORS 

A. T. McLean, H. B. Jennings, F. F. Gray, A. E. White, L. H. Caldwell, S. F. Caldwell, J. D. McLean, 
all of Lumberton, N. C; K. M. Biggs, Lumberton, N. C. 

HISTORY 
Organized January 11, 1907 under Laws of North Carolina; Private Accounts 1903, Chapter 203 
Private Accounts 1907, Chapter 67. 

ROAD OPERATED 





1926 


1927 


Hope Mills, N. C. to Lumberton, N. C. (miles) 


52.94 


52.94 


St. Paul, N. C. to Elizabethtown, N. C. (miles) 











CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 




1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



141,000.00 

2,663.39 

524,000.00 

9,897.99 

680,421.96 

12,852.70 

77,015.11 

1,454.66 

14,307.46 

257,382.07 

206,234.02 

51,148.05 

4,861.57 

3,889.56 

229,830.38 

19,251.63 

4,341.33 

21,379 

363.65 

10,101.49 

.038 

13,461.19 



141,000.00 

2,663.39 

524,000.00 

9,897.99 

683,576.17 

12,912.30 

77,855.96 

1,357.31 

14,269.59 

189,572.79 

150,064.18 

39,508.61 

3,580.91 

2,834.61 

168,088.82 

15,302.35 

3,175.10 

14,606 

289.08 

3,630.06 

.039 

12,194.63 



Employees: Number — General Officers, 3-3; Office clerks, 4-4; Station agents, 4-4; Other Station 
men, 8-10; Enginemen, 2-2; Firemen, 2-2; Conductors, 4-4; Other trainmen, 5-5; Machinists, 2-2; 
Carpenters, 2-1; Other shopmen, 1-1; Section foremen, 7-7; Other trackmen, 46-27; Other employees, 
8-3. Total, 98-75. 



Warrenton Railroad Company 



89 



WARRENTON RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 










C. R. Rodwell _ 






A. C. Blalock __ 











DIRECTORS 

W. G. Rogers, Warrenton, N. C; C. E. Jackson, Warrenton, N. C.J M. P. Burwell, Warrenton, N. C; 
R. T. Watson, Warrenton, N. C.J H. A. Moseley, Warrenton, N. C; C. R. Rodwell, Warrenton, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized April, 1876, under Laws of North Carolina; Battles Revisal General Laws of North Caro- 
lina. 

ROAD OPERATED 




1927 



Warrenton, N. C. to Warren Plains, N. C. (miles) - 



3.00 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock _ _ 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road _ _. 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue*... 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes Paid, North Carolina 



66,000.00 
22,0000.00 



53,887.13 
17,962.38 
13,465.52 

4,488.50 
22,450.88 
36,126.82 
30,542.64 

5,584.18 

1,861.39 
10,180.88 
36,483.84 

1,150.75 
12,161.28 



383.58 
371.10 



1,751.49 



66,000.00 
22,000.00 



54,273.47 
18,091.16 
13,465.52 

4,488.50 
22,579.66 
49,416.93 
34,837.00 
14,579.93 
16,472.31 
11,612.33 
47.824.62 

1,592.31 
15,941.54 



530.77 
405.00 



2,318.86 



Employees: Number — General officers, 5-4; Office clerks, -3; Station agents, -1; Other Station men , 
4-2; Enginemen, 1-1; Firemen, 1-1; Total, 12-. 

*Pas8enger service discontinued in February, by consent of the Commission. 



90 N. C. Corporation Commission 

WASHINGTON AND VANDEMERE RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 






Title 


Name 


Official Address 






Washington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 


General Manager or Superintendent 


P. R. Albright 


Secretary and Treasurer 




Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 











DIRECTORS 

A. D. McLean, Washington, N. C; C. A. Flynn, Washington, N. C; Lyman Delano, Wilmington, 
N. C; Geo. B. Elliott, Wilmington, N. C; R. D. Cronly, Wilmington, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized March 4, 1903, under Laws of North Carolina. Act of General Assembly, Chapter 245, 
Private Laws 1903. Amended by Act of General Assembly, Chapter 40, Private Laws of 1907. 

ROAD OPERATED 



Near Washington, N. C. to Vandemere, N. C. (miles) - 




CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1926 



1927 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue (Loss) 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



125,000.00 


$ 125,000.00 


3,084.90 


3,084.90 


720,000.00 


720,000.00 


17,769.00 


17,769.00 


599,258.81 


600,076.52 


14,789.21 


14,809.39 


67,537.60 


57,274.60 


1,666.77 


1,413.49 


16,455.98 


16,222.88 


71,299.34 


26,229.00 


94,455.67 


23,381.56 


23,156.33 


2,847.44 


1,759.61 


647.31 


2,321.09 


577.04 


60,700.04 


23,773.47 


10,140.99 


2,411.93 


1,498.03 


586.71 


8,785 


1,897 


250.27 


59.52 


458.31 


43.60 


.0347 


.0352 


5,423.22 





Employees: Number — General officers, 1-; Station agents, 3-1; Other station men, 2-; Enginemen, 
1-; Firemen, 1-; Conductors, 1-; Other trainmen, 2-; Telegraph operators, 1-; Section foremen, 4-; 
Other trackmen, 12-; Other employees, 2-. Total, 30-. 

*Leased to Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co. May 1, 1927. 



Wilmington, Brunswick and Southern Kailroad Co. 



91 



WILMINGTON, BRUNSWICK AND SOUTHERN RAILROAD 

COMPANY 





Title 


OFFICERS 

Name 


Official Address 




M. J. Corbett ____1_ 








M. W. Divine __ _ _____ 








Waller Taylor _. _ __ 


Wilmington, N. C. 




H. C. McQueen 






H.M.Shannon 


Southport, N. C. 









directors 

M. J. Corbett, Wilmington, N. C; J. W. Brooks, Wilmington, N. C; M. W. Divine, Wilmington, 
N. C; F. B. Gault, Wilmington, N. C; Walker Taylor, Wilmington, N. C; J. A. Jones, Laurinburg, 
N. C; H. C. McQueen, Wilmington, N. C; C. E. Taylor, Jr., Wilmington, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized January 22, 1907, under Laws of North Carolina, General Laws. 

ROAD OPERATED 



1927 



Nevassa, N. C. to Southport, N. C. (miles). 




30.2 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1926 


1927 


Capital stock 


$ 165,000.00 

5,463.59 

. 180,000.00 

5,960.26 

447,336.89 

14,812.48 

57,211.62 

1,894.42 

16,706.90 

44,114.43 

50,395.03 

6,280.60 

1,460.74 

1,668.71 

33,286.78 

9,101.28 

1,102.21 

4,405 

301.37 

1,726.37 

.03475 

1,898.17 


$ 165,000.00 


Capital stock, per mile _ , 


5,463.59 


Funded debt 


183,750.00 


Funded debt, per mile 


6,084.44 


Cost of road 


462,836.56 


Cost of road, per mile 


15,325.72 


Cost of equipment 


57,211.62 


Cost of equipment, per mile __ 


1,894.42 


Cost of road and equipment, per mile , 


17,220.14 


Operating revenue 


46,746.50 


Operating expenses (Interest on bonds not included) _ 


47,457.06 


Net operating revenue 


710.56 


Operating revenue, per mile 


1,547.90 


Operating expenses, per mile 


1,571.42 


Total freight revenue 


38,599.15 


Total passenger train service revenue 


6,318.22 


Freight revenue, per mile 


1,278.12 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue 


1,899 


Passenger service train revenue, per mile __ 


209.21 


Revenue from other sources 


1,829.13 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile 


.037 


Taxes paid, North Carolina __ 


1,985.15 







Employees: Number — General officers, 5-5; Office clerks, 1-2; Station agents, 2-2; Other station 
men, 2-2; Enginemen, 1-1; Firemen, 1-1; Conductors, 1-2; Other trainmen, 1-2; Machinists, 1-1; Other 
shopmen, 1-1; Section foremen, 2-2; Other trackmen, 11-10; Total, 30-31. 



92 



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Water Transportation Lines 95 

WATER TRANSPORTATION LINES— 1927 



Name 


Length 

of 
Route 


Gross 
Receipts 


Gross 
Expenses 


Value of 
Vessels 


Albermarle Steam Navigation Co. 


130 

80 
200 


$ 46,771.23 
29,282.37 
68,713.29 
14,028.49 
17,655.89 
20,949.97 
3,265.42 


$ 53,950.00 
25,718.39 
72,424.82 
11,018.59 
16,412.38 
22,536.13 


$ 46,293.08 


Bennett North Carolina Line 

Norfolk, Va 


1,500.00 


Carolina and Chesapeake S. S. Co., 


10,000.00 


Cashie River Line, 


10,000.00 


Daniels Fairfield Line, 

Elizabeth City 


81 
47 


5,000.00 


Eastern Carolina Transportation Co., 


21,815.78 


Norfolk-Baltimore and Carolina Line, 

Norfolk, Va 


18,000.00 


*Perquimans River Line, 








Roanoke River Line, 


85 
22 
60 
25 


9,266.83 
9,875.69 

22,888.32 
8,572.46 


7,827.88 

8,916.03 

24,255.28 

14,559.99 


11,000.00 


Salmon Creek Line, 


11,000.00 


Wanchese Line, 

Elizabeth City - .. . 


26,000.00 


Potter Tow-Boat Co., 


22,500.00 







'Discontinued. 



N. C. Corporation Commission 
EXPRESS COMPANIES 



AMERICAN RAILWAY EXPRESS COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 



Chairman of Board. 



President. 



Vice-President in Charge of Operations. 
Vice-President in Charge of Operations. 
Vice-President in Charge of Operations. 
Vice-President in Charge of Operations. 
Vice-President in Charge of Operations. 

Vice-President in Charge of Traffic 

Vice-President in Charge of Accounts. . 
Vice-President in Charge of Personnell. 

Secretary 

Vice-President and Treasurer 

General Counsel 

General Auditor 

General Auditor 

General Auditor 



Name 



J. Horace Harding. 
Robt. E. M. Cowie 

C. W. Robie 

E. A. Stedman 

C. D. Summy 

Wm. G. Smith 

.L O. Head 

F. S. Holbrook 

Chas. A. Lutz 

L. R. Gwyn 

E. R. Merry, Jr.... 

J. W. Newlean 

H. S. Marx 

J. F. Brizzie 

Richard Burr 

H. D. Freeman 



Official Address 



65 Broadway, New 

York, N. Y. 
65 Broadway, New 

York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Chicago, 111. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Chicago, 111. 
New York, N. Y. 



DIRECTORS 

J. S. Alexander, W. M. Barrett, Newcomb Carlton, Frederick, H. Eckner, Robt. E. M. Cowie, 
H. W. deForest, J. Horace Harding, W. Averill Harriman, Charles Hayden, J. G. Milburn, Mortimer 
L. Schiff, A. H. Wiggin, aU of New York, N. Y. 

HISTORY 

Organized June, 1918, under Laws of Delaware. 



MILEAGE 





Entire System 


. N. 


C. 




1926 


1927 


1926 


1927 


Steam Lines 


221,979.51 

2,890.45 

24,408.12 

573.78 

10.75 


222,422.78 

2,963.71 

24,008.12 

668.82 


3,074.62 
26.69 


3,060.42 




26.69 




















4,508.00 














Total _ 


249,862.61 


254,582.18 


3,101.31 


3,087.11 







American Railway Express Co. 
operating revenues 



97 



Account 


1926 


1927 


Transportation : 


$294,512,402.91 
6,610.95 


$ 284,502,314.55 




10,386.46 








$294,519,013.86 
147,812,158.57 


$ 284,512,701.01 


Contract Payments: 


139,493,535.13 








$146,706,855.29 


$ 145,019,165.88 






Operations Other Than Transportation: 


$ 209,295.95 

4,580.26 

135,710.30 

2,492,443.86 

254.72 

547,961.74 


$ 209,737.19 




4,938.92 




141,108.97 


C. 0. D. Checks..- 


2,470,018.27 




246 . 79 




884,229.69 








$150,097,102.12 


$ 148,729,445.71 







OPERATING EXPENSES 



Account 


1926 


1927 


Maintenance 


$ 8,385,786.72 

281,282.31 

130,423,121.08 

7,734,654.44 


$ 8,292,515.55 


Traffic 


263,762.60 




129,130,542.75 




7,779,940.86 










$146,824,844.53 


$ 145,466,761.76 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



BALANCE SHEET 



Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1926 


Liabilities 


Balance at 

Close of 
Year 1926 


Investment 


$ 53,232,901.16 

34,463,908.56 

431,986.87 

1,958,554.85 


Capital Stock 


$ 34,642,000.00 






28,166,105.04 






1,529,729.65 






22,534,647.11 






3,214,869.64 




Total 




Total _ 


$ 90,087,351.44 


$ 90,087,351.44 








Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1927 


Liabilities 


Balance at 

Close of 

Year 1927 




$ 55,107,278.25 

30,952,575.07 

356,829.55 

1,901,748.51 




$ 34,642,000.00 






25,212,913.10 






838,128.63 






24,292,040.33 




Corporate surplus 

Total 


3,333,349.32 


Total _ 


$ 88,318,431.38 


$ 88,318,431.38 











EQUIPMENT OWNED 








1926 


1927 


Equipment Owned 


$ 27,616,550.00 


$ 28,938,213.73 







Southeastern Railway Express Co. 



99 



SOUTHEASTERN EXPRESS COMPANY 

OFFICERS— 1927 



Title 


Name 


Official AddresB 




J. E. Skaggs 












F. W. Woods 




General Counsel L 


Saunders McDaniel . 






J. E. O'Keeffe 






W. F. FerrelL.- 




Traffic Manager 


C. B. Williams 











DIRECTORS 

H. C. Armstrong, Selma, Ala.; R. A. Brown, Birmingham, Ala.; Jos. L. Graham, Winston-Salem 
N. C; Saunders McDaniel, Atlanta, Ga.; Robt. F. Maddox, Atlanta, Ga.; Z. C. Patten, Chattanooga 
Tenn.; J. E. Skaggs, Atlanta, Ga. 



HISTORY 



Organized 1920, under Laws of Alabama. 



MILEAGE 





Entire System 


N. 


D. 




1926 


1927 


1926 


1927 


Steam roads . .. 


9,980.65 

37.72 

388.00 


9,978.35 

37.72 

333.00 


1,471.57 


1,471.57 


Electric lines 


Indland steamboat lines . 












Total 


10,406.37 


10,349.07 


1,471.37 


1,471.57 





100 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

OPERATING REVENUES 



Account 


1926 


1927 


Transportation : 

Express — domestic 


$ 8,251,839.22 
4,911.19 


$ 8 , 170 , 687 . 34 




5 668 63 






Total transportation 


$ 8,256,750.41 


$ 8,176,355.97 






Contract Payments: 

Express privileges — Dr 


$ 4,021,219.32 


$ 3,970,988.77 








$ 4,235,531.09 


$ 4,205,367.20 






Operations Other Than Transportation: 


$ 62.65 

3.86 

3,840.32 

11,121.02 

102,997.28 

2,795.98 


$ 70 . 76 




.35 




5,278.50 




11,529.94 


C. 0. D. checks.. 


110,484.40 




9,152.37 








$ 4,356,352.20 


$ 4,341,883.52 







OPERATING EXPENSES 



Account 


1926 


1927 




$ 292,061.03 

62,037.66 

3,572,079.12 

269,504.75 


$ 239,466.67 


Traffic 


77,064.36 


Transportation 


3,594,581.37 


General 


277,356.23 








$ 4,195,682.56 


$ 4,188,469.63 







Southeastern Railway Express Co. 



101 



BALANCE SHEET 



Assets 


Balance at 

Close of 
Year 1926 


Liabilities 


Balance at 

Close of 
Year 1926 




S 1,274,159.53 

1,485,921.10 

24,435.75 


Capital stock _ 


$ 1,000,000.00 






1,013,990.18 






662,814.90 






107,711.30 




Total 




Total 


$ 2,784,516.38 


$ 2,784,516.38 








Assets 


Balance at 

Close of 

Year 1927 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1927 




$ 1,219,244.74 

1,594,966.16 

54,612.35 




$ 1,000,000.00 






984,620.23 






756,579.44 






127,623.58 




Total 




Total 


$ 2,868,823.25 


$ 2,868,823.25 









EQUIPMENT OWNED 





1926 


1927 


Equipment owned 


$ 1,038,255.89 


$ 1,037,568.89 



102 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



THE PULLMAN COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




E. F. Cary 






J. F. Kane 






Geo. A. Kelly 

















PROPERTY OPERATED 





1926 


1927 


Total length of main lines of railroads over which its cars run 


178,118 
1,829.85 


182,961 




1,867.88 









CAPITAL STOCK 








1926 


1927 




$135,000,000.00 


$ 135,000,000.00 







Postal Telegraph Cable Co. 



103 



POSTAL TELEGRAPH CABLE COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






New York, N. Y. 






New York, N. Y. 




William C. Daviet. 


New York, N. Y. 






New York, N. Y. 






New York, N Y. 




R. J. Hall__ 


New York, N. Y. 






New York, N. Y. 




M. W. Blackmar, ._ __ 


New York, N. Y. 




W. B. Dunn 


New York, N. Y. 









RECEIPTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 



1926 



1927 



Commercial telegraph tolls, interstate. . 
Commercial telegraph tolls, intrastate . 
Government telegraph tolls, interstate. 
Government telegraph tolls, intrastate . 

Press telegraph tolls, interstate 

Press telegraph tolls, intrastate -- 

Other telegraph transmission revenue . 

Stock and Commercial News 

Money transfer tolls 

Money transfer premiums 

Messenger service 

Telegraph tolls on cable messages 

Telephone receipts, interstate 

Telephone receipts, intrastate 

Rents from other operated property. .. 

Rents from leased wires 

Land tolls on radio 

Miscellaneous rent income 



Total receipts. 



199,212 

43,930 

1,699 

3,854 



192. 

,352. 

,021. 

126. 

,281. 

1,826. 

367. 

1,195. 

11,698. 

19,466. 

2,018. 



34.83 
599.97 



302,879.38 



195,855.02 

50,588.47 

776.30 

1,273.56 

5,377.32 

6,476.62 



5,038.39 

2,667.48 

1,731.32 

1,290.00 

1,426.72 

12,407.26 

17,921.14 

2,119.15 

724.78 

41.16 

780.00 



306,495.62 



104 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

EXPENSES IN NORTH CAROLINA 



1926 



1927 



Testing and regulating 

Supervision of operations 

Wages, operators 

Wages, bookkeepers and clerks 

Commission 

Messenger service expenses 

Telephone service 

Rents of telegraph offices 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Stationery and printing 

Operating power 

Advertising 

Traffic damages _ _-. 

Workmen's compensation 

Law expenses connected with damages. 

Repairs of office equipment 

General law expenses 

Division cable bureaus 

Minor rents for property... 

Salaries of general officers 

Salaries of general office clerks _ 

Supply store salaries and expense 

Central Business Bureau 

Development and research 

Valuation expenses 

Expenses of general officers and clerks. 

General stationery and printing 

Other general office expenses 

Plant supervision expenses 

Supervision of maintenance 

Engineering expenses 

Repairs of aerial plant. 

Telegraph and telephone development. 

Other operating expenses 

Surety account 

Bad customers 

Pension and relief 

Motor vehicle expenses 

Repairs of underground plant — 

Taxes _ 



56,914.55 

53,511.57 

29,629.72 

6,303.08 

32,413.44 

3,512.78 

32,619.59 

6,932.55 

2,650.85 

1,784.15 

299.15 

862.66 



361.60 

989.02 

133.02 

100.40 

418.54 

1,581.23 

1,764.81 

1,030.26 

623.72 

182.41 

321.48 

80.02 

308.79 

1,424.80 

466.47 



1,343.11 

29,211.38 

28.10 

3,987.11 

114.85 

2,548.69 

2,135.18 



2,675.76 



114.00 

57,390.69 

50,444.47 

29,213.66 

4,952.71 

35,396.86 

4,046.46 

35,597.46 

6,845.40 

3,008.20 

2,035.95 



862.22 

429.35 

607.93 

1,469.47 

124.31 

478.53 

3,478,19 

1,649.75 

2,181.33 

640.39 

441.81 

171.51 

258.89 

316.30 

288.17 

1,391.46 

2,337.65 

14.21 

2,302.95 

32,847.40 

18.03 



39.11 

1,825.17 

623.03 

982.26 

275.90 

10,450.93 



Total expenses. 



279,264.84 



295,552.11 



Western Union Telegraph Co. 



105 



WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY 

Organized April, 1851, under Laws of New York 
PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Newcomb Carlton 


New York, N. Y. 




G. W. E. Atkins 


New York, N. Y. 




A. F. Burleigh 


New York, N. Y. 




G. K. Huntington 


New York, N. Y. 




H. W. Ladd ' 

F. R. Stark 


New York, N. Y. 




New York, N. Y. 




R. H. Overbaugh 


New York, N. Y. 









PROPERTY OPERATED 





Entire System 


North Carolina 




1926 


1927 


1926 


1927 




24,688 

213,367 

1,402,532 

36,549 
265,761 


24,765 

214,799 

1,503,298 

36,957 
279,842 


488 

4,215 

30,427 

20 

950 


505 




4,203 




30,755 


Miles of Cable 


21 




1,173 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 





1926 


1927 


Capital stock 


$ 99,786,530.41 

263,663,670.43 

327,360,963.42 

71,404,042.19 

134,464,886.43 


$ 99,787,706.91 


Plant, equipment and real estate 


273 , 342 , 357 . 79 


Total assets 


337,312,515.90 


Surplus 


78,528,581 89 


Gross operating revenues 


131,771,003.02 







106 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

RECEIPTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 





1926 


1927 


Intrastate: 


$ 406,882.77 

126.48 

23,414.46 

4,792.36 

20,844.80 

7,886.92 


$ 388,987.13 




185.65 




19,792.06 




7,254 34 




20,050.17 




6,824.46 






Total__ 


$ 463,947.79 


$ 443,093.81 






Interstate: 


$ 1,284,673.69 
404.49 
10,217.71 
65,001.72 
60,316.48 
18,507.89 
20,438.63 


$ 1,214,638.97 




572.31 




11,966.15 




65,764.17 




65,036.51 




16,994.76 




20,794.03 






Totals 


$ 1,459,560.61 


$ 1,395,766.90 








$ 1,923,508.40 


$ 1,838,860.71 







EXPENSES IN NORTH CAROLINA 





1926 


1927 




$ 1,283,188.31 

443,480.09 

65,806.08 

48,985.31 


$ 1,233,453.51 




425,083.45 




64,355.72 


Taxes - 


72,283.71 






Totals 


$ 1,841,459.79 


$ 1,795,176.39 







Blue Ridge Power Co. 



107 



BLUE RIDGE POWER COMPANY 

Incorporated 1915, under general laws of North Carolina. 

The principal office is at Sparatanburg, S. C. 

Officers, 1926: John A. Law, President, Sparatanburg, S. C; J. P. Campbell, New York, Treasurer 
O. A. Meyer, Manager, Hendersonville, N. C. 

Electricity is furnished for lighting purposes to the following towns (retail); Hendersonville, N. C; 
Campobello, N. C; Duncan, N. C; Spartanburg, S. C; Gramlin, S. C; Sigsbee, S. C; New Prospect, 
S. C; Lake Sumit, N. C; Tucapeau, S. C; Converse, S. C; Cherokee, S. C; Mill Springs, N. C; 
and Saluda, N. C. Electricity is furnished at wholesale to the following towns: Chesnee, S. C; Greer, 
S. C. and Wellford, S. C. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1926 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 




$ 4,457,348.75 

500,000.00 

35,790.40 

1,368,413.84 

17,523.11 




$ 2,170,000.00 




Funded Debt 


1,900,000.00 






2,333,915.15 






44,180.88 






116,000.61 




Profit and Loss (Defict) 

Total 


185,020.54 


Total 


$ 6,379,076.10 


$ 6,379,076.10 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— 1926 

Total operating revenue $ 660 , 469 . 15 

Total operating expenses 403,859.20 

Profit $ 256,609.95 



STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC PLANT AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS 
DURING YEAR 

Rated capacity in kilowatts of generators installed — hydraulic 10,804 

Number of kilowatt hours generated during year — hydraulic 21, 871, 000 

Number of kilowatt hours received from other companies 20,460,755 

Total K.W.H. generated and received 42,331,755 

K.W.H. used in station and station loss 214,090 

K.W.H. delivered to transmission system 42, 117, 665 

K.W.H. delivered distribution system (12—13) 42,117,665 



108 N. C. Corporation Commission 

BROAD RIVER POWER COMPANY 

Incorporated July 19, 1924, under the Laws of South Carolina. 
The principal office is at Columbia, S. C. 

Officers: (1927) W. S. Barstow, President, New York; Lucien H. Tyng, Vice President, New York; 
J. P. Campbell, Treasurer, New York; C. N. Wilson, Secretary, New York. 



OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

(For 7 months, ending July 31, 1927) 

Electricity furnished for lighting purposes retail, in the following North Carolina towns: Henderson- 
ville, Lake Summit, Mill Springs, Salyda, Tryon, Columbus, Tuxedo, Flat Rock. 

OPERATIVE REVENUES AND EXPENSES— 1927 

Total operating revenues _ $ 161,557.71 

Total operating expenses 14,024. 12 



STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC PLANT AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS 
DURING YEAR 

Rated capacity in kilowatts of generators installed — hydraulic 10, 804 

Number of kilowatt hours generated during year — hydraulic 15, 546 , 100 

Total K.W.H. generated and received- 15,546,100 

K.W.H. used in station and station loss 111,800 

K.W.H. delivered distribution system 15,434,300 



Carolina Power & Light Co. 109 

CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Incorporated April 6, 1926, under general laws of North Carolina. 

The principal office is at 5 West Hargett Street, Raleigh, N. C. 

Officers: (1927) S. Z. Mitchell, Chairman of Board, New York, N. Y.; B. S. Jerman, President, 
Raleigh, N. C; Wm. Darbee, Vice-President, New York, N. Y.; P. A. Tillery, Vice-President, Raleigh, 
N. C; E. W. Hill, Vice-President, New York, N. Y.; E. P. Summerson, Secretary, New York, N. Y.; 
H. L. Martin, Asst. Secretary, New York, N. Y.; A. C. Ray, Treasurer, New York, N. Y.; G. J. Hick- 
man, Asst. Treasurer, New York, N. Y.; C. J. Curry, Asst. Secretary and Treasurer, Raleigh; B. M. 
Jones, Asst. Secretary and Treasurer, Asheville, N. C. 



BALANCE SHEET— 1927 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 


Fixed Capital.. 


$68,770,129.07 

949,324.68 

6,528,988.49 

928,322.28 

56,234.34 

1,400.00 

1,208,860.97 

21,429.46 

38,242.17 

40,527.73 

1.00 

304.00 

314.00 

335,083.38 

22,420.46 

9,367,164.72 

70,946.97 

106,000.00 

21,158.00 




$ 40,314,457.62 


Cash . 


Capital Stock Subscribed 


38,504.00 




36,406,000.00 






1,196,384.06 






208,427.81 




Consumer's Ext. Dept 


68,774.96 




424,935.75 


Material and supplies 


Miscellaneous current liabilities 


13,341.39 
696,831.34 






485,938.59 


Subscribers to capital stock 


Miscellaneous accrued liabilities 


4,806.82 
2,431,115.16 




Casualty and insurance reserve. 
Contributions for extensions 


199,394.25 


Miscellaneous investments 


73,213.31 
174,062.30 


Unamortized debt expense 

Clearing or apportionment accts 


Miscellaneous reserve 

Miscellaneous unadjusted 


311,426.87 
1,392.50 


Miscellaneous suspense 

Reacquired securities — bonds. _. 
Treasury securities — stock 


Profit and loss — surplus 

Total 


5,417,874.9 


Total 


$88,466,851.72 


$ 88,466,851.72 









110 N. C. Corporation Commission 

TOWNS AND CITIES SERVED WITH ELECTRICITY 
RETAIL 

Aberdeen, Asheboro, Angier, Alma, Asheville, Arden, Biscoe, Bonlee, Buie's Creek, Bishopville, 
S. C, Beaverdam, Biltmore, Brickton, Black Mountain, Bynum, Bladenboro, Cameron, Candor, 
Carbonton, Carthage, Cary, Clinton, Community, Coats, Cheraw, S. C, Chesterfield, S. C, Candler, 
Chunn's Grove, Canton, Clyde, Craggy, Carter's Crossing, S. C, Dunn, Darlington, S. C, Dillon, 
S. C, Ellerbee, Ether, Emma, Elliott, S. C, Franklinton, Franklinville, Four Oaks, Fuquay Springs, 
Florence, S. C, Fletcher, Fairview, Goldsboro, Goldston, Gulf, Grace, Garner, Hamp, Henderson, 
Holly Springs, Hartsville, S. C, Hot Springs, Haywood, Hazelwood, Inanda, Jackson Springs, Jones- 
boro, Jefferson, Kenly, Kenilworth, Lakeview, Liberty, Lillington, Latta, S. C, Lilesville, Leicester, 
S. C, Littleton, Lamar, S. C, Lynchburg, S. C, Manly, Moncure, Mt. Gilead, Mt. Olive, Mt. Vernon, 
Micro, Maxton, Marion, S. C, Mullins, S. C, Morven, McColl, S. C, Mt. Crogan, S. C, Macon, 
Mayesville, Niagara, Norlina, Oxford, Olanta, S. C, Pinebluff, Line Level, Pittsboro, Princeton, 
Pageland, S. C, Raeford, Raleigh, Ramseur, Roxboro, Roseboro, Rockingham, Rowland, Ruby, 
Sanford, Siler City, Southern Pines, Staley, Star, Salemburg, So. Biltmore, Skyland, Sumter, S. C, 
Spruce Pine, Troy, Tatum, S. C, Timmonsville, S. C, Vass, Varina, Vaughan, Wendell, Wadesboro, 
Woolsey, Weaverville, Woodfin, Warrenton, Zebulon. 



TOWNS AND CITIES SERVED WITH ELECTRICITY 
WHOLESALE 

Apex, Benson, Brickhaven, Cedar Falls, Central Falls, Clayton, Cumberland, Cumnock, Colon, 
Camden, Erwin, Falls Neuse, Gayetteville, Tremont, Hope Mills, Kollock, S. C, LaGrange, Long- 
hurst, Lumberton, Laurinburg, Marshall, Overhills, Pikeville, Pinehurst, Pee Dee, Selma, Smithfield, 
St. Pauls, Wake Forest, Worthville, Waynesville, Youngsville, Laurel Hill. 

Town and Cities served with Gas: Raleigh, Durham, Asheville. 

Cities in which Street Railways are Operated: Raleigh, Asheville. 



Carolina Power & Light Co. Ill 

OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 



Raleigh Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Henderson Division 

Total operating revenue =. 

Total operating expenses 

Oxford Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Fayetteville Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Sanford Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Goldsboro Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Selma Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Roxboro Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 1 

Dunn Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Clinton Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Mt. Olive Division 

Total operative revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Wendell — Zebulon Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Asheboro Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Southern Lines Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses. 



1926 



1,159,641.85 
788,116.66 



358,547.26 
188,621.57 



79,843.15 
41,684.57 



340,036.07 
169,834.16 



177,045.59 
82,977.62 



299,634.56 
135,573.01 



152,625.59 
76,467.90 



127,108.67 
69,257.19 



266,868.06 
134,813.16 



51,027.82 
24,311.01 



31,966.91 
13,594.86 



37,050.96 
18,293.69 



100,164.27 
54,101.26 



154,048.81 
72,041.63 



1927 



933,079.60 
461,132.67 



414,085.49 
219,179.24 



86,823.77 
41,389.41 



371,604.30 
187,457.77 



194,931.52 
98,293.06 



217,543.03 
140,187.53 



173,925.37 
82,492.77 



136,162.77 
73,952.38 



292,102.32 
151,923.93 



61,100.98 
30,889.24 



33,184.13 
14,624.51 



60,631.64 

27,825.72 



127,383.86 
67,952.32 



168,470.54 
77,401.12 



112 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

OPERATING REVENUE Continued 



Siler City Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Troy Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Raliegh — Durham Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Hamlet Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Rockingham Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Wadesboro Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Lumberton Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Waxton Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Laurinburg Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Asheville Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Rocky Mount Division 

Total operating revenue _ 

Total operating expenses 

Marion Division 
Total operating revenue- 

Total operating expenses - 

Bishopville Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 

Cheraw Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 



1926 



66,258.77 
32,337.24 



131,695.52 
59,153.52 



59,710.63 
32,967.17 



126,247.21 
57,461.95 



260,155.22 
165,907.23 



154,293.07 
66,871.71 



99,770.91 
47,263.14 



152,396.55 
73,779.40 



194,023.73 
86,490.22 



1,336, lo3. 10 
619,126.30 



5,568.42 
2,932.23 



117,633.17 
54,506.61 



57,101.06 
26,205.45 



168,221.21 

69,496.68 



1927 



76,377.33 
36,074.06 



179,460.48 
90,234.95 



124,807.98 
61,985.42 



431,084.89 
234,875.23 



167,526.32 

84,462.78 



124,345.58 
69,809.77 



239,241.31 
134,657.77 



231,609.04 
116,443.75 



1,462,072.97 
720,059.06 



22,464.85 
14,186.20 



130,015.62 
65,406.36 



75,789.15 
36,651.15 



179,306.00 
80,534.82 



Carolina Power & Light Co. 

OPERATING REVENUE— Continued 



113 



Caniden Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 



Darlington Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 



Dillion Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 



Florence Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 



Sumter Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 



Hartsville Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 



1926 



115,382.26 
50,686.71 



83,223.55 
38,056.88 



77,630.51 
35,063.13 



262,009.59 
108,313.53 



19,841.94 
12,068.76 



204,830.01 
100,190.25 



1927 



123,006.06 
64,818.01 



94,779.09 
55,551.78 



119,516.24 
58,982.98 



260,554.69 
118,089.26 



173,596.49 
100,338.65 



216,714.03 
121,817.87 



OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES STREET RAILWAY DEPARTMENT 



Raleigh 



Total operating revenue.. 
Total operating expenses. 



Asheville 



Total operating revenue.. 
Total operating expenses. 



1926 



194,285.20 
144,592.20 



382,786.66 
249,105.23 



1927 



177,899.75 
146,537.29 



343,395.36 
243,483.16 



OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— GAS DEPARTMENT 



Raleigh 



Total operating revenue.. 
Total operating expenses. 



Durham Division 

Total operating revenue 

Total operating expenses 



Asheville 



Total operating revenue.. 
Total operating expenses. 



1926 



245,796.21 
175,332.77 



139,533.70 
99,558.88 



154,804.54 
105,256.92 



1927 



261,680.14 
195,650.83 



149,977.74 
105,792.98 



154,572.11 
111,391.94 



114 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC PLANTS AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS 
DURING YEAR— (All Plants) 



Rated capacity in kilowatts of generators installed — steam 

Rated capacity in kilowatts of generators installed — hydraulic . 

Number of hours plant was operated during year 

Number of kilowatt hours generated during year — steam 

Number of kilowatt hours generated during year — hydraulic 

Average number of kilowatt hours generated per hour in operation.. 

Maximum peak load on plant during year, in kilowatts 

Average load factor on plant during year 

Number of kilowatt hours received from other companies 

Total K. W. H. generated and received (44 + 5 + 9) 

K.W.H. delivered to transmission system (10—11) 

Transmission used by company 

K.W.H. lost in distribution and otherwise unaccounted for__ 

Per cent distribution loss and otherwise unaccounted for (16-^15).. 
K.W.H. delivered at consumers' premises — sales (15 — 16) 



1926 



189, 
127, 



108 
426 
426 
4 
100 

322 



52,310 
36,300 

972,096 
833,100 

64,000 
51.2 
,594,474 
,399,670 
,399,670 
,229,972 
,124,035 
23.4 
,045,663 



1927 



46 , 750 

36,300 

8,760 

150,758,000 

144,481,000 

33,700 

81,000 

41.6 

131,186,000 

426,426,000 

426,426,000 

6,485,406 

743,167,17 

17.4 

345,623,877 



GAS PROPERTY STATISTICS 



AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 

Durham Gas Plant 



Type of gas-making apparatus 

Number of Coal gas benches 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F, per day) 

Number of water gas sets 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F.) per day 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) 

Annual production coal gas (M.C.F.) 

Annual production water gas (M.C.F.) 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds, (M.C.F.) 

Total gas delivered to mains (M.C.F.) 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Percent unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Tons coal carbonized during year 

Gallons of gas oil used during year 

By-products made: 

Coke (tons) 

Tar (gallons 

Average yield during year per lb. coal carbonized (Cub. ft.). 
Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured. 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon 

Total miles of gas mains 

Average pressure at consumer's meter (inches) 

Maximum pressure at consumer's meter (inches) 

Minimum pressure at consumer's meter (inches) 

Maximum day (24 hrs.) send-out during year M.C.F 

Total number regular meter customers 

Total number prepaid meter customers 

Total number all customers 



1926 



Coal & water. 

5 

250 

1 

750 

1000 

190 

40 

60,564.4 

31,501.5 

92,065.9 

92,065.9 

77,651.2 

313.5 

14,101.2 

15.3 

5,250.9 

9,7417. 

3,421.6 

62,705 

5.78 

3.09 

536 

$5.38 

$0,072 

47.6 



1927 



5 

3 

342.1 

1858 

491 

2349 



5 

250 

1 

750 

1000 

190 

40 

653,54.9 

31,077.3 

96,432.2 

96,437.2 

81,185 

372.1 

14,880.1 

15.4 

5,664.8 

101,799 

3,678. 

69,613. 

5.77 

3.28 

538 

$5.45 

$0.0716 

53.6 

4 

5 

3 

371 

2062 

443 

2505 



Carolina Power & Light Co. 



115 



CAS PROPERTY STATISTICS AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 

Raleigh Gas Plant 





1926 


1927 




Coal & water. 

8 

560 

1 

160 

720 

250 

150 

127,969 

49,839 

177,808 

177,760 

136,835.3 

633.7 

40,291 

22.7 

11,275.5 

167,434 

7,440.4 

161,460 

5.68 

3.36 

536 

$5.54 

$0,073 

69.6 






8 




560 




1 




160 




720 


Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 


250 




150 




134,525 




52,867 


Total gas manufactured all kinds (M.C.F.) 


187,392 


Total gas delivered to mains (M.C.F.) 


187,381. 




143,943 




754.6 




42,684.2 




22.8 




11,536.9 




185,410 


By-products made: 


7,157.4 


Tar (gallons) ._ 


156,559 




5.83 


Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons) __ 
Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) . 


3.51 
540 


Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) -__-. 


$5.49 


Average cost of gas oil used per gallon _. 


$0.0741 


Total miles of gas mains . .... 


73.9 


Average pressure at consumers meters (inches) __ . 


7 


Minimum pfessure at consumer's meters (inches) . 


9 

2 

662 

3,519 

97 

3,616 


9 


Minimum pressure at consumer's meters (inches) 


6 


Maximum (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F.) . 


731 


Total number regular meter customers _ 


3,872 


Total number prepaid customers 


72 


Total number all customers 


3,944 







116 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



GAS PROPERTY STATISTICS AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 

Asheville 





1926 


1927 


Type of gas-making apparatus 


Coal Gas 

4 

350 





250 

300 

94,197 

94,197 

94,105 

85,681 

233 

8,191 

8.7 

8,283 

5,387 

82,830 

5.68 

551 

$4.35 

38.3 




















Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 




































By-products made: 

Coke.- 




Tar 


























8 

3 

304 

2,526 



2,526 





























Carolina Power & Light Co. 



117 



STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATION 

DURING YEAR 

Raleigh 





1926 


1927 


Total A.C. kilowatt hours delivered to railway feeders during year 
(K.W.H.) 


1,593,400 

560 

2 

1,000 

6,570 

2,581,890 

16 

95,085 

644,138 

32 



2 

34 

11.61 

2.37 

.48 

14.46 

6.15 

1.93 


1,570,503 


Maximum 2-minute peak or demand on railway feeders during year 
(K.W.). 


560 




2 




1,000 




6,570 




2,386,605 




16 




95,18 




639,490 




32 









2 




34 




11.61 




2.37 




.48 


Total track mileage 


14.46 




6.15 




1 93 







STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATION 

DURING YEAR 

Asheville 





1926 


1927 


Total A.C. kilowatt hours delivered to railway feeders during year 
(K.W.H.).. 


2,327,000 

1300 

4 

1,400 

6,570 

6,336,075 

26 

. 133,535 

1,136,115 

35 



8 

43 

16.88 

1.95 

1.30 

20.13 

14.50 

1.35 


2,622,679 


Maximum 2-minute peak or demand on railway feeders during year 
(K.W.)__ 


1300 


Number of rotary converters and motor-generator sets 


4 


Rated K.W. capacity.. _ 


1,400 


Number of hours railway operated during year 


6,570 




5,695,758 


Average number of cars operated 


31 


Total car hours operated during year. 


142,073 




1,220,689 




36 









8 


Total all cars owned 


44 


Miles of first main track (route miles) 


17.29 


Miles, of second main track (miles of double track) 


2.20 


Miles of sidings, crossovers, car-house and storage track 


1.30 


Total track mileage 


20.79 


Miles of single track paved by railway company 


14.50 




1.35 







118 N. C. Corporation Commission 

CAROLINA GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 

HISTORY 

Incorporated June 2, 1927, under Laws of North Carolina. 
Principal offiice: Kinston, N. C. 

Officers: (1927) President, R. A. Blackwood, Kinston; Vice-President, H. A. Clark, New York; 
Secretary, S. C. Bragaw, Washington, N. C; Treasurer, E. W. Freeman, New York. 

TOWNS AND CITIES SERVED WITH ELECTRICITY 

Pallocksville, Trenton, Jacksonville, Bridgeton, Arapahoe, Bayboro, Oriental, Grifton, Pink Hill* 
Deep Run, Maysville, Belgrade, James City, Grantsboro, Alliance. 

TOWNS AND CITIES SERVED WITH GAS 

Greenville, Washington, New Bern, Goldsboro, Kinston, Fayetteville. 

OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— ELECTRIC 
NEW BERN 

1927 

Total operating revenue 35,331.21 

Total operating expenses 34,656.30" 

KINSTON 

Total operating revneue. .. 11,690.01 

Total operating expenses. _ 9,060.66 

OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— GAS 
FAYETTEVILLE GAS PLANT 

Total operating revenue. 44,713.54 

Total operating expenses 36,287.01 

KINSTON GAS PLANT 

Total operating revenue 32,892.93 

Total operating expenses 26,314.17 

GOLDSBORO GAS PLANT 

Total operating revenue.. _ 62,122.82 

Total operating expenses 40,680.73 

NEW BERN GAS PLANT 

Total operating revenue _ 40,651.74 

Total operating expenses 32,602.71 

WASHINGTON GAS PLANT 

Total operating revenue 38,997.23 

Total operating expenses 27,361.41 

GREENVILLE GAS PLANT 

Total operating revenue 19,016.54 

Total operating expenses _ 17,332. 10 



Carolina Gas & Electric Co. 119 
statistics of electric plants at end of year and operations 

DURING YEAR— (All Plants) 

1927 

Rated capacity in kilowatts of geneators installed — steam 70 

Number of kilowatt hours generated during year — steam (Combustion engine) 3,482 

Number of kilowatt hours received from other companies __ 923,826 

Total K.W.H. generated and received- . - 927,308 

K.W.H. delivered to transmission system 927,308 

K.W.H. loss in transmission and transformation 380,882 

Per cent transmission and transformation. ._ — 43 

K.W.H. delivered distribution system.. _ 546,426 

K.W.H. delivered at consumers' premises — sales 546,426 

Total number of customers. _ 1,005 



STATISTICS OF GAS PROPERTY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS 
DURING YEAR —(All Plants) 

1927 

Types of gas-making apparatus Water 

Number of water gas sets 10 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 2, 150 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 1, 650 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 530 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) 650 

Annual production water gas.. 137,919 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) 137,919.0 

Total gas delivered to mains (M.C.F.) 137,919.0 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 103,433.8 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) 1,432.6 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.).. 33,052.71 

Per cent unaccounted for (M-C.F.) 24 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons) 422 , 7 14 

By-products made: 

Tar (Gallons) 1,015 

Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons) 3.1 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) 553 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.), $5.00 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) $8.00 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon $0.07 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 88 

Average pressure at consumers' meters 4 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 5 

Minimum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 3.5 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F.) 106 

Total number regular meter customers 3,119 

Total number prepaid meter customers 666 

Total number all customers _ 3,785 



120 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



CONCORD AND KANNAPOLIS GAS COMPANY 

Incorporated 1917, under general Laws of North Carolina. 

Principal office: Concord. 

Officers: (1927) A. E. Pierce, President, Chicago; R. L. Aagee, Vice-President, Chicago; Geo. R. 
Horning, Vice-President, Chicago; W. S. McCollough, Treasurer, Chicago; W. W. Winter, Asst. 
Treasurer, Chicago; W. M. McFarland, Secretary, Chicago. 

Towns and Cities served with gas: Concord and Kannapolis. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1927 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 




$ 225,127.63 

4,165.48 

11,492.49 

9,051.59 

1,010.05 

138.47 
689.63 




$ ' 150,000 00 


Cash 


Accounts payable 


3,170.02 






79.00 






1 , 325 . 00 




Miscellaneous accrued liabilities 
Advances from affilicated Corn- 


31.24 


Investments in affiliated Com- 
panies 


272.75 




Retirement reserve 


65,587.45 




989.23 




Profit and loss — surplus 

Total _ 


30,220.65 


Total _ 


$ 251,675.34 


$ 251,675.34 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 



Total operating revenue . 
Total operating expenses. 



1926 



$ 50,347.84 
33,615.19 



1927 



55,839.21 
32,241.59 



Concord and Kannapolis Gas Co. 



121 



STATISTICS OF GAS PROPERTY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS 
DURING YEAR 



Types of gas-making apparatus 

Number of coal gas benches __ _ — 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day; 

Number of water gas sets _ 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F 

Total gas delivered to mains (M.C.F.) 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 

Total gas used by company (M .C.F.) 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Per cent unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Tons of coal carbonized during year (tons) 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons) 

By-products made: 

Coke (ton) 

Tar (gallons) .. 

Average yield during year per pound of coal carbonized (cubic feet).. 
Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons) 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon (cents) 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (lbs.) 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (lbs. ) 

Minimum pressure at consumers' meters (lbs.) 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F.) 

Total number regular meter customers 

Total number prepaid meter customers 

Total number all customers. 



1926 



1927 



Coal, water a 


nd gas. 


2 


2 


120 


120 


1 


1 


100 


200 


220 


320 


55 


70 


60 


60 


27,015.4 


29,085 


26,949.7 


29,016 


22,072.5 


24,353 


478.9 


355 


4,398.3 


4,407 


16 


15.1 


2,150 


2,262 


194 


1,339 


1,397 


1,470 


21,500 


22,615 


6 


6.35 


3.5 


3.3 


540 


540 


$5.37 


$5.37 


$0.08 


$0.0825 


30 


30 


5 


5 


6 


7 


4 


3 


98,000 


104 


788 


851 


230 


140 


1,018 


991 



122 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



DUKE POWER COMPANY 

(Report for one month, ending December 31, 1927) 

Incorporated April, 1917, under the General Laws of New Jersey. 

Main office: Charlotte, N. C. 

Officers: President, G. G. Allen, New York; Secretary and Treasurer, W. C. Parker, New York; 
Vice-President, B. N. Duke, New York; Vice-President, W. R. Perkins, New York; Vice-President, 
W. S. Lee, Charlotte, N. C; Vice-President, N. A. Cocke, Charlotte, N. C; Vice-President, C. I. 
Burkholder, Charlotte, N C. 

Towns and Cities served with electricity, wholesale: 

Albemarle, Benton Heights, Boiling Springs, Cherryville, Concord, Cornelius, Catawba, Dallas, 
Davidson, Ellenboro, Forest City, Gastonia, Huntersville, Kings Mountain, Landis, Lexington, 
Lattimore, Maiden, Mooresville, Monroe, Mooresboro, Mocksville, Newton, Rutherfordton, Shelby, 
Statesville, Waxhaw, Abbeville, S. C, Clinton, S. C, Due West, S. C, Easley, S. C, Greenwood. 
S. C, Greer, S. C, Honea Path, S. C, Newberry, S. C, Ninety Six, S. C, Prosperity S. C, Pickens, 
S. C, Rock Hill, S. C, Seneca, S. C, Westminster, S. C. 

BALANCE SHEET 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

Close of Year 

1927 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

Close of Year 

1927 




$106,274,560.79 

552,032.90 

223,816.11 

28,457,663.53 

182,979.42 
1,265,124.31 
39,813.06 

24,400,031.00 

130,362.00 

15,442.36 

1,995,828.55 

669,552.50 




$ 90,989,036.00 


Cash... . 




47,967,000.00 






5,998,662.81 






905,408.00 






1,189,166.47 






201,307.15 




Advances from affiliated 






2,616,751.29 


Investments in affiliated 




8,444,040.55 




Casualty and insurance reserve 
Miscellaneous unadjusted 


302,147.93 


Miscellaneous investments 


8,322.77 


Unamortized debt expense 

Treasury securities-stock 


Profit and loss — surplus 

Total 


4,727,433.58 


Total 


$164,207,206.53 


$164,207,206.53 









OPERATING REVENUES AND EXPENSES 

Total operating revenue $1 , 470 , 506 . 66 

Total operating expenses 629,924.08 



Duke Power Co. 123 



STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC PLANT AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS 
DURING YEAR 

Rated capacity in kilowatts of generators installed — steam 174,600 

Rated capacity in kilowatts of generators installed — hydraulic 439, 978 

Number of hours plant was operated during year 11,167 

Number of kilowatt hours generated during year — steam 12, 148 , 600 

Number of kilowatt hours generated during year — hydraulic 124 , 095 , 260 

Average number of kilowatt hours generated per hour in operation 12, 200 

Number of kilowatt hours received from other companies 3, 877 , 564 

Total K.W.H. generated and received (4 + 5+9)... 140,121,42 

K W.H. used in station and station loss 2,744,938 

K.W.H. delivered to transmission system (10—11).. 137,376,46 

K.W.H. loss in transmission and transformation.. 11,359,596 

Per cent transmission and transformation (loss 13 + 12). 8.76 

K.W.H. delivered at consumers' premises— sales (15 — 16) 126,016,890 

K.W.H. delivered transmission system by steam plant... 11,023,700 

Pounds of coal consumed (including banking) in producing above power 24,989,198 

Average number of pounds of coal consumed per K. W.H. delivered to transmission 

system (20 + 19) - 2.3 

B.T.U. per pound of coal 13,500 

Rated capacity in horsepower of boilers installed 15,764 



124 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



DURHAM PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 



Incorporated February 1, 1901. 
Main office: Durham, N. C. 

Officers: Vice-President and General Manager, R. 
A. W. Grady, Durham. 

Electricity retailed in Durham and Creedmoor. 
Electricity wholesaled for resale in Durham. 
Street Railway operated in Durham. 



L. Lindsey, Durham; Secretary and Treasurer 



BALANCE SHEET— 1927 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 




$ 2,796,043.95 

14,813.08 

14,595.57 

324,829.16 

486.58 

108,669.53 

43,084.81 

846.75 

500.00 
5,001.00 
191,551.31 
14,103.49 


Capital 8 tock __ 


$ 600,000.00 


Cash 




1,900,000.00 






74,514.00 






159,484.12 






48,943.93 




Matured undelivered 






80.10 




Miscellaneous current 






10,773.80 






15 , 727 . 39 






33,176.75 


Miscellaneous investments 

Unamortized debt expense 

Treasury securities-stock 


Miscellaneous accrued 


140.68 




268,375.94 


Miscellaneous reserves 


76,779.75 
326,528.77 




Total 




Total _ 


$ 3,514,525.23 


$ 3,514,525.23 









OPERATING REVENUES AND EXPENSES 

1926 1927 

Total operating revenue $1 , 185 , 150 . 66 $1 , 397 , 987 . 71 

Total operating expenses 906,035.38 1,061,177.05 



Durham Public Service Co. 



125 



STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC PLANT AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS 
DURING YEAR 



Rated capacity in kilowatts of generators installed — steam (K.W.) 

Number of kilowatt hours generated during year — steam 

Number of kilowatt hours received from other companies 

Total K.W.H. generated and received 

K.W.H. used in station and station loss 

K.W.H. delivered to transmission system 

K.W.H. loss in transmission and transformation 

Per cent transmission and transformation (loss) 

K.W.H. delivered distribution system 

K.W.H. lost in distribution and otherwise unaccounted for 

Per cent distribution loss and otherwise unaccounted for 

K.W.H. delivered at consumers' premises — sales 

Working pressure of steam in boilers 

Rated capacity in horsepower of boilers installed 



1926 



3,100 


31,000 




160,000 


15,474,000 


16,834,000 


15,474,000 


16,994,000 


28,200 


23,555 


15,445,800 


16,970,445 


653,900 


840,600 


4.2 


4.9 


14,791,900 


16,129,845 


1,153,292 


1,435,497 


7.8 


8.8 


11,229,454 


12,508,576 


190 


190 


1,724 


1,724 



1927 



STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATION 

DURING YEAR 





1926 


1927 


Total D.C. kilowatt hours delivered to railway feeders during year 
(K.W.H.) _ 


1,076,389 

450 

2 

500 

47,964 

48,733 

2,401,432 

9 

6 

47,964 

48,733 

438,231 

487,789 

21 

17 

1 

39 

7.57 

7.57 

7.40 

2.12 


818,415 


Maximum 2-minute peak or demand on railway feeders during year 
(K.W.) _ 




Number of rotary converters and motor-generator sets _ _ 


2 


Rated K.W. capacity 

Number of hours railway operated during year 


500 
40,808 


Number of hours Busses operated during year 

Total number of revenue passengers carried during year _. 


71,775 
2,603,056 


Average number of cars operated, Railway 

Average number of Busses operated _ . 


6 
9 


Total car hours operated during year, Railway 

Total car hours operated during year, Busses 

Total car miles operated during year, Railway.: 

Total car miles operated during year, Busses 

Number of passenger cars owned (motor) 


40,808 

71,775 

305,143 

648,883 

19 


Number of passenger cars owned (trail) - _ 


17 


Number of freight and express cars owned 

Total all cars owned 

Miles of first main track (route miles) 


1 

37 

5.67 


Total track mileage ... __ 


5.67 


Miles of single track paved by railway company 

Miles of double track paved by railway company 


7.40 
2.12 



126 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



ELIZABETH AND SUBURBAN GAS COMPANY 

Incorporated May 23, 1927. 

Main office: Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Officers: President, N. H. Gilbert, Philadelphia; Vice-President, M. T. Cooke, Jr., Philadelpnia» 
Secretary and Treasurer, M. W. Arnett, Jr., Philadelphia; General Manager, Z. C. Wagoner, Elizabeth 
City. 

Gas plant operated in Elizabeth City. 



BALANCE SHEET— 1927 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 




? 734.20 

8,660.53 

9,980.01 

1,995.00 

4,675.00 

9,700.00 

23,687.00 

55,897.78 

44,950.00 

14,180.47 

500.00 

400.00 


Notes payable - ,.---- 


$ 2,408.41 




Accountsjpayable 


3,286.5 




95.00 






80,000.00 






73,971.48 




Reserve for retirement 

Total 


15,598.52 


Miscellaneous equipment 
























Total 


$ 175,359.99 


$ 175,359.99 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— 1927 



Total operating revenue.. 
Total operating expenses. 



$21,617.89 
18,275.76 



Elizabeth and Suburban Gas Co. 127 

statistics of gas property at end of year and operations 
during year 

1927 

Types of gas-making apparatus Water 

Number of water gas sets 1 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F, per day). 150,000 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) _ _ 30 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) 80 

Annual production water gas (M.C.F.) _ 9,058 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F. )___ 9,058 

Total gas delivered to mains (M.C.F.)... 9,058 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 8,552.2 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) _ 168 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 337.8 

Per cent unaccounted for (M.C.F.).., 3.7 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons) 21,671 

Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons) 239 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) i 540 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.), generator coal $5.77 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.), steam coal $5. 18 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) $9.03 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon (cents) $7.48 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 15.5 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 5 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 7 

Minimum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 3.5 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year 68,000 

Total number regular meter customers 539 

Total number prepaid meter customers 173 

Total number all customers 712 

*Owned and operated in 1926 by Southern Gas Improvement Company. 



128 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



FAYETTEVILLE LIGHT AND POWER COMPANY 

Incorporated, 1912, under the Laws of North Carolina. 
Main office: Fayetteville, N. C. 

Officers: President, R. A. Blackwood, Kinston; Treasurer, R. A. Blackwood, Kinston; Secretary, 
S. C. Bragaw, Washington, N. C. 
Gas plant operated at Fayetteville. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1926 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 




$ 207,442.15 
2,966.20 
5,288.24 
4,613.42 
883.43 
200.00 
6,376.14 
5,286.51 




$ 75,000.00 


Cash . .. 




125,000.00 






28.57 






1,983.52 






2,911.67 






15.00 






320.05 






3,125 00 






141.18 




Renewals and replacements 


5,790.72 
1,973.77 




Profit and loss — suplus 

Total 


9,537.56 


Total 


$ 233 , 056 . 09 


$ 233,056.09 











OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— 1926 



Total operating revenue $ 42,778.-81 

Total operating expenses 35, 193 . 48 



Fayetteville Light and Power Co. 129 
statistics of gas property at end of year and operations during year 

1926 

Types of gas-making apparatus 

Number of coal gas benches 1 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 50 

Number of water gas sets 1 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 250 

Total plant generating capacity (M .C.F. per day) 300 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 50 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) 90 

Annual production coal gas (M.C.F.) 20,000 

Annual production water gas (M.C.F.) 7,000 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) 27,000 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 20,000 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) 300 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 6,700 

Per cent unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 25 

Tons of coal carbonized during year (tons) 1, 800 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons.) 30,000 

By-products made: 

Coke (tons) 1,100 

Tar (gallons) 18,000 

Average yield during year per pound of coal carbonized (cubic feet) 514 

Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons) - 4 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.). 580 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) $7,00 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) $7.50 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon (cents) 7.5 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 18 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 3.5 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters 4 

Minimum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 3 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year 100 

Total number all customers 600 

*1927 — Owned and operated by Carolina Gas and Electric Co. 



130 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



GASTONIA AND SUBURBAN GAS COMPANY 

Incorporated, 1917, under General Laws of North Carolina. 

Main office: Gastonia. 

Officers: President, A. E. Pierce, Chicago; Vice-President, R. L. Aagee, Chicago; Vice-President, 
George R. Homing, Chicago; Secretary, W. M. McFarland, Chicago; Treasurer, W. A. McCullough, 
Chicago; Assistant Treasurer, W. W. Winter, Chicago. 

Gas plant at Gastonia. 

BALANCE SHEET 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 




$ 177,894.10 

5,986.40 

12,876.43 

7,345.92 

520.76 

8,166.13 


Capital stock 


$ 100 , 000 . 00 


Cash __ 


3,838.93 






3,118.70 


Material and supplies 




2,118.83 




Advances from affiliated 




Investments in affiliated 


28,584.49 




Retirement reserve 


39,011.52 




1 , 402 . 53 




Profit and loss — surplus 

Total 


34,714.74 


Total 


$ 212,789.74 


$ 212,789.74 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 



1926 1927 

Total operating revenue $54,640.26 $58,247.98 

Total operating expenses 33,157.96 31,860.26 



Gastonia and Suburban Gas Co. 131 

statistics of gas property at end of year and operations during year 



Types of gas-making apparatus.. 

Number of water gas sets... 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.). __ 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) 

Annual production water gas (M.C.F.) 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) 

Total gas delivered to mains (M.C.F.) 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Per cent unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons) 

By-products made, Tar (gallons) __ 

Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons) 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Minimum pressure at consumers' meters (inches; 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F.) 

Total number regular meter customers 

Total number prepaid meter customers 

Total number all customers 



1926 



1927 



Water 


Water 


2 


2 


420 


400 


420 


400 


75 


75 


90 


90 


28,090 


29,536 


28,090 


29,536 


28,035 


29,536 


23,892 


25,775 


441 


354 


3,757 


3,407 


13.3 


11.5 


78,029 


84,005 


7,803 


8,400 


2.78 


2.75 


540 


540 


$5.50 


$5.50 


$8.60 


$8.60 


$0.08 


$0.08 


28.88 


29.9 


4 


4 


6 


6 


3 


3 


108 


121 


802 


819 


157 


162 


959 


981 



132 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



GOLDSBORO GAS COMPANY 



Incorporated, 1917, under the General Laws of North Carolina. 
Main office: Goldsboro, N. C. 

Officers: President, R. A. Blackwood, Kinston; Secretary, S. C. Bragaw, Washington; Treasurer, 
R. A. Blackwood, Kinston. 
Gas plant at Goldsboro. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1926 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 




$ 293,975.19 
4,567.88 
7,568.64 
4,560.54 
2,466.74 
979.81 
4,098.33 
13,841.92 

$ 332,059.05 




$ 100 , 000 . 00 


Cash 




150,000 00 






691.66 






2 , 540 . 00 




Dividends payable 


15.00 




46.44 




Interest accrued (bond) 


3,750.00 




556 . 63 




Renewals and replacements 


23,027.79 
599 . 08 




Profit and loss — surplus 

Total 


50,832.45 


Total -. 


$ 332,059.05 







OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— 1926 

Total operating revenue . $ 59,035.44 

Total operating expenses 44,439.8 



STATISTICS OF GAS PROPERTY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 

1926 

Types of gas-making apparatus 

Number of water gas sets 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) 

Annual production water gas (M.C.F.) _ 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons) 

Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F.) 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) . 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (lbs.) 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F.) 

Total number regular meter customers 

Total number prepaid meter customers 

Total number all customers ' 

*1927 — Owned and operated by Carolina Gas and Electric Company. 



Water 

2 

350 

350 

180 

180 

32,797 

32,797 

26,170 

300 

6,327 

91,160 

3 

540 

$ 5.65 

$ 7.65 

$0,075 

20 

10 

150 

579 

260 

839 



Greenville Gas Co. 



133 



*GREENVILLE GAS COMPANY 



Incorporated under the General Laws of North Carolina. 
Main office: Greenville, N. C. 

Officers: President, R. A. Blackwood, Kinston, Sectretary, S. 
Treasurer, R. A. Blackwood, Kinston. 
Gas plant at Greenville. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1926 



C, Bragaw, Washington, N. C.J 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 




$ 185,952.04 

20.00 

1,899.84 

2,233.40 

213.03 


Capital stock _. 


$ 50,000.00 


Cash 


Long term debt - 


125,000.00 




Accounts payable 


2,950.65 






130.00 


Prepayments 


Matured interest unpaid 


6,250.00 
1,319.45 






3,125.00 






204.26 




Contributions for extensions 

Renewals and replacements 


15,000.00 

4,630.44 

200.00 






18,491.49 




Total 




Total 


$ 190,318.31 


$ 190,318.31 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— 1926 

Total operating revenue $ 13,494.88 

Total operating expenses 22,089.76 

STATISTICS OF GAS PROPERTY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 

1926 

Water 

1 

200 

200 

60 

50 

7,899 

2,283 

5,616 

147 

25,730 

3 

540 

$5.25 

$8.00 

$0,074 

7 

4H 

AV 2 

AV 2 

140 

10 

150 



Types of gas-making apparatus _ 

Number of water gas sets _. 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day)_._ 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) _ 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Tons of coke during year (tons) 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons) 

Average gallons of oil used per M. C. F. of gas manufactured (gallons). 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (inches 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Minimum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Total number regular meter customers 

Total number prepaid meter customers 

Total number all customers 

*1927 — Owned and operated by Carolina Gas and Electric Company. 






134 N. C. Corporation Commission 

*KINSTON GAS COMPANY 

Incorporated under General Laws of North Carolina. 
Main office: Kinston. 

Officers: President, R. A. Blackwood, Kinston; Secretary, S. C. Bragaw, Washington: Treasurer 
R. A. Blackwood, Kinston. 
Gas plant at Kinston. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1926 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 




$ 236,743.65 

15,00 

4,244.09 

5,000.42 

68.05 




$ 50,000 00 


Cash __. 




175,000.00 






14,048.84 




Consumer's deposit 

Matured interest unpaid 


80.00 




9,187.50 




614.93 






4,375.00 




Renewals and replacements 

Doubtful accounts 

Profit and loss — deficit 

Total. _ . ... ... 


6,035.68 

143.83 

13,414.57 


Total _ 


$ 246,071.21 


$ 246,071.21 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— 1926 

Total operating revenue. $ 21,629.25 

Total operating expenses 23,773.37 



STATISTICS OF GAS PROPERTY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 

1926 
Types of gas-making apparatus Water 



Number of water gas sets 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total plant generating capacity (M .C.F. per day) 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) 

Annual production water gas (M.C.F.) 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) 

Total gas delivered to mains (M.C.F.) 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) 

Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons). 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Minimum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F.) 

Total number regular meter customers 

Total number prepaid meter cus tomers 

Total number all customers 

*1927 — Owned and operated by Carolina Gas and Electric Company. 



1 

350 

350 

110 

55 

4,064 

4,064 

4,064 

2,933 

150 

31 

540 

$5.25 

$7.50 

$0,075 

13 

6 

8H 

4H 

50 

271 

10 

281 



Henderson and Oxford Gas Co. 



135 



^HENDERSON AND OXFORD GAS COMPANY 

Incorporated May 19, 1927. 
Main office: Henderson, N. C. 

Officers: President, H. H. Gellert, Philadelphia; Vice-President, M. T. Cooke, Jr., Philadelphia; 
Secretary-Treasurer, W. W. Arnett, Jr., Philadelphia. 
Gas plants at Henderson and Oxford. 



BALANCE SHEET— 1927 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 




$ 6,613.66 

5,380.94 

3,550.00 

10,200.00 

18,000,00 

29,275.00 

88,801.60 

30,815.00 

1,048.00 

19,625.00 

300.00 

350.00 

410.53 

373.16 




$ 974.21 






1,512.38 






803 . 00 






125,000.00 






65,469.47 


Miscellaneous equipment 


Reserve for retirement 

Total _._ 


20,237.51 


















Transportation equipment 




Deficit 








Total 


$ 213,996.57 


$ 213,996.57 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— 1927 



Total operating revenue _.. $ 22,277.77 

Total operating expenses 14, 495 . 67 



136 N. C. Corporation Commission 

STATISTICS OF GAS PROPERTY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 

1927 

Types of gas-making apparatus Water 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) _ 150 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 150 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) _ __ 70 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) _ 100 

fAnnual production water gas (M.C.F.) 9,665.5 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) __ 9,965.5 

Total gas delivered to mains (M.C.F.) __ 9,965.5 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.)... 8,183.1 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) 8.8 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) _. 1,782.4 

Per cent unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 21.9 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons) 21,966 

Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons). __ 2.61 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) _ __ 540 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) _ $5.25 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) $9.79 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon $0,722 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 32 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 3H 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 4H 

Minimum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) _ _ 3 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F.) _ 78 

Total number regular meter customers 562 

Total number prepaid meter customers 100 

Total number all customers 662 

♦1926 — Owned and operated by Southern Gas Improvement Compai y. 
t Production from June 1, 1927 to Dec. 31, 1927. 



Melrose Power and Manufacturing Co. 137 

*MELROSE POWER AND MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

Main office: Hendersonville, N. C. 

Officers: President, W. S. Barstow, Vice-President, Lucien H. Tyng, Treasurer, J. P. Campbell; 
Secretary, C. N. Wilson, all of New York. 

Electricity retailed in Tryon, Columbus, N. C, and Landrum, S. C. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1926 



Assets 




Liabilities 




Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 


Fixed capital 


S 138,833.49 

50.00 

14,076.38 




S 100,000.00 


Cash. 




8,659.70 






4,442.56 






6,300.00 






100.00 




Profit and loss — surplus 

Total 


33,457.61 


Total 


$ 152,959.87 


152,959.87 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— 1926 

Total operating revenue $ 56,440.34 

Total operating expenses 36,945.08 



All power purchased. 
♦1927— Merged with Broad River Power Co., Columbia, S. C. 



138 N. C. Corporation Commission 

NEW BERN-GHENT STREET RAILWAY COMPANY 

Incorporated under the General Laws of North Carolina. 
Main office: New Bern. 

Officers: President, F. Sitterding, Richmond, Va.; Secretary and Treasurer, C. J. McCarthy 
New Bern. 

Street Railway operated in New Bern. 

BALANCE SHEET 1927 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 




$ 60,000.00 
10,000.00 
33,100.00 




$ 43 , 100 . 00 


Prepayments 

Deficit 


Matured long term debt unpaid 
Total 


60,000.00 






Total 


$ 103,000.01 


$ 103 , 100 . 00 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 



1926 



Total operating revenue $ 3,429.62 $ 

Total operating expenses 6,185.79 



1927 
1,539.62 
3,614.15 



STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATION 

DURING YEAR 



Number of rotary converters and motor-generator sets.. 

Rated K.W. capacity 

Number of hours railway operated during year 

Total number of revenue passengers carried during year 

Average number of cars operated. _ 

Total car hours operated during year.. 

Total car miles operated during year 

Number of passenger cars owned (motor) 

Total all cars owned 

Total miles track _. 



1926 



1 


1 


100 


100 


6,205 


6,205 


68,592 


7,795 


1 


1 


6,205 


6,205 


21,600 


21,600 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3.77 


3.77 



1927 



New Bern Gas and Fuel Co. 



139 



-NEW BERN GAS AND FUEL COMPANY 



Incorporated 1917, under General Laws of North Carolina. 
Main office: New Bern. 

Officers: President, R. A. Blackwood, Kinston; Secretary, Stephen C. Bragaw, Washington, N. C. 
Treasurer, R. A. Blackwood, Kinston. 
Gas plant at New Bern. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1926 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 




$ 245,299.62 

967.07 

21,542.60 

2,238.65 

1,241.58 

100.00 

3,220.84 




$ 100,000.00 






125,000.00 






3,727.45 


Material and supplies 




1 , 030 . 00 




100.00 






2,604.16 




Advances from affiliated 






2,184.00 




Renewals and replacements 


30,194.56 
691.41 




Profit and loss — surplus 

Total 


9,078.78 


Total .__ 


$ 274,610.36 


$ 274,610.36 







OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— 1926 

Total operating revenue _ $ 41,958.45 

Total operating expenses _ 35,825.83 

STATISTICS OF GAS PROPERTY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 

1926 

Types of gas-making apparatus 

Number of water gas sets 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F) 

Total rated steam boiler capacity )H.P.) 

Annual production water gas (M.C.F.) 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons) 

Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons) 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) _ 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (inches) ___ 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Minimum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F.) 

Total number regular meter customers 

Total number prepaid meter customers 

Total number all customers 

*1927 — Owned and operated by Carolina Gas and Electric Company. 



Water 

1 

200 

200 

45 

160 

22,727 

22,727 

200 

67,836 

3 

540 

$5.75 

$8.25 

$0.07 

2 



3 

100 
529 
172 
701 



140 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 

Incorporated Feb. 28, 1924, under General Laws of North Carolina. 

Main office: Charlotte. 

Officers 1927: President, E. C. Marshall, Charlotte; Vice-President, R. L. Peterman, Charlotte; Vice- 
President, A. V. Harril, Charlotte; Vice-President, John Paul Lucas, Charlotte; Treasurer, D. G. 
Calder, Charlotte; Asst. Treasurer, H. N. Varner, Greensboro; Secretary, W. C. Parker, New York; 
Asst. Secretary, L. H. Adams, Charlotte. 

Cities and towns served with electricity, retail: Burlington, Greensboro, Salisbury. 

Cities and towns served with electricty (wholesale) for resale: High Point. 

Gas plants operated at Burlington, Greensboro, Salisbury, Winston-Salem. 

Street Railways operated in Greensboro and Salisbury. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1927 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 

$11,189,644.29 

42,414.52 

1,005.00 

305,103.09 

200,598.52 

17,915.23 

2,604.00 

306.70 

9,985.00 

492,861.67 

3,099.63 

1,602,900.00 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 

$ 3,605,624 03 


Cash __ _ 


Payment on preferred stock 


780 00 




8,310,200.00 






150,000.00 






184,935.45 






64,666.69 






2,939.11 




Miscellaneous current liabilities 


408,224.22 




88,707.57 






35,066.25 


Miscellaneous suspense 


Miscellaneous accrued liabilities 


40,198.12 
195,132.93 




Contributions for extensions 


467.57 
212,943.87 






40,698.90 




Profit and loss — surplus 

Total _ . 


527,852.94 


Total 


$13,868,437.65 


$ 13,868,437.65 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 

1926 1927 

Total operating revenue $ 2,096,533.68 $ 2,455,008.26 

Total operating expenses 1,332,454.93 1,479,354.70 



STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC PLANT AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING 

YEAR 



Rated capacity in kilowatts of generators installed — steam (K.W.) 

Number of kilowatt hours generated during year — steam 

Number of kilowatt hours received from other companies 

Total K.W.H. generated and received 

K.W.H. used in station and station loss 

K.W.H. delivered distribution system 

K.W.H. lost in distribution and otherwise unaccounted for 

Per cent distribution loss and otherwise unaccounted for 

K.W.H. delivered at consumers' premises — sales 

Working pressure of steam in boilers (lbs.) 

Rated capacity in horsepower of boilers installed 

Square feet heating surface in boiler feed water economizers 



1926 


1927 


500 


500 


9,800 





49,476,580 


55,300,380 


49,486,380 


55,300,380 




772,095 




54,528,285 




6,037,345 




11 




48,490,940 


225 


225 


1,750 


1,750 


240 


240 



North Carolina Public Service Co. 



141 



STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATION 

DURING YEAR 



Number of kilowatt hours generated during year (K.W.H.). 
Number of kilowatt hours purchased during year (K.W.H.) 

Number of rotary converters and motor-generator sets 

Rated K.W. capacity 

Total number of revenue passengers carried during year 

Average number of cars operated 

Total car hours operated during year 

Total car miles operated during year 

Number of passenger cars owned (motor) 

Total all cars owned 

Miles of first main track (route miles) 

Miles of second main track (miles of double track) 

Total track mileage 

Miles of single track paved by railway company 

Miles of double track paved by railway company 



2,: 



937, 



1926 


1927 


9,800 





369,517 


1,839,820 


4 


4 


1,000 


1,000 


937,671 


2,780,305 


19 


16 


122,356 


102,730 


,711.70 


820,338.12 


35 


35 


35 


35 


25.40 


25.40 


1.25 


1.25 


26.65 


26.65 


16.10 


16.10 


1.25 


1.25 



STATISTICS OF GAS PROPERTY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 



Types of gas-making apparatus 

Number of coal gas benches. , 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Number of water gas sets 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) 

Annual production coal gas (M.C.F.) 

Annual production water gas (M.C.F.) 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) 

Total gas delivered to mains (M.C.F.) 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Per cent unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Tons of coal carbonized during year (tons) 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons) 

By-products made: 

Coke (tons) 

Tar (gallons) 

Average yield during year per pound of coal carbonized (cubic feet).. 
Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons. 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon (cents) 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Minimum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F.) 

Total number regular meter customers 

Total number prepaid meter customers 

Total number all customers 



1926 

Water and 

19 

1,140 

4 

1,700 

2,840 

850 

340 

330,373 

41,392 

371,765 

371,765 

271,775 

2,220 

97,770 

26.3 

27,531 

144,872 

19,271 

272,644 

6 

3H 

540 

$5,143 

$5.00 

8.145 

256.07 

5 

7 

4 

1,679 



9,800 



1927 



Gas 



19 

1,140 

4 

1,700 

2,840 

850 

340 



495,116 

495,116 

363,776 

1,873 

129,467 

26 

33,230 

308,251 

22,654 

377,018 

6 

3H 

540 

$5,143 

$5.00 

8.145 

256.07 

5 

7 

4 

1,679 



10,879 



142 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



^SOUTHERN GAS IMPROVEMENT COMPANY 

Incorporated January 6, 1913, under the Laws of North Carolina. 

Offices: Elizabeth City and Henderson. 

Officers; (1926), President, W. F. Harold Broun, Philadelphia; Secretary and Treasurer, Herman 
Stein, Philadelphia; General Manager, W. G. Murfit, Newtown, Pa; Local Manager, J. T. Stallings, 
Elizabeth City; Local Manager, L. V. Jenkins, Henderson. 

Gas plants at Elizabeth City and Henderson. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1926 (Elizabeth City Plant) 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year ■ 

1926 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 




$ 191,007.20 

919.24 

10,951.00 

9,697.69 

13,022.82 

2,650.72 

79,795.93 




$ 80,000.00 


Cash 




80,000.00 


Accounts receivable 

Material and supplies 

Investment in affiliated 


Matured bond interest 

Matured interest unpaid 

Accounts payable 


76,175.02 

20,857.83 

5,762.92 

95.00 






4,004.11 






41,149.69 




Total ._ 




Total 


$ 308,044.57 


$ 308,044.57 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES (Elizabeth City Plant) 

Total operating revenue $ 34,818.80 

Total operating expenses 33,818.80 



STATISTICS OF GAS PROPERTY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 



Types of gas-making apparatus 

Number of water gas sets 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) 

Annual production water gas (M.C.F. ( 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) 

Total gas delivered to mains (M.C.F.) 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons) . 

By-products made: Tar (gallon) 

Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons). 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon (cents) 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F.) 

Total number regular meter customers 

Total number prepaid meter customers 

Total number all customers 



1926 
Water 



1 
150 
150 



18,302.7 

18,302.7 

18,302.7 

15,474.8 

174.4 

2,653.5 

59,590 

2,500 

3,808 

520 

$5.58 

$9.88 

$8.55 

15 

8 

4 

60 

602 

147 

749 



Southern Gas Improvement Co. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1926 (Henderson Plant) 



143 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 




$ 241,144.57 

400.00 

12,393.66 

5,634.11 

4,088.41 


Capital stock 


$ 100,000.00 


Cash 


Bonds - _ 


100,000.00 




Cash overdrawn _ _ _ 


2.28 




Matured bond interest 

Matured interest unpaid 


76,175.02 




34,560.70 




1,390.28 






3 , 984 . 40 






276.11 






769 . 50 




To Gas Improvement Co. Eliz- 


7,307.68 




Retirement reserve 


4,663.26 
68,908.03 








Total. 


$ 398,037.2b 


Total 


$ 398,037.26 







OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 1926 (Henderson Plant) 

Total operating revenue $ 33, 256 . 64 

Total operating expenses 29,583.31 



STATISTICS OF GAS PROPERTY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 

(Henderson Plant) 

1926 

Types of gas-making apparatus Water 

Number of water gas sets 1 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 100 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 100 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 100 

Annual production water gas (M.C.F.) 16,825.2 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) 16,825.2 

Total gas delivered to mains (M.C.F.) 16,825.2 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 13,896.2 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) 98 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 2,831 

Per cent unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 17.2 

By-product made : Tar (gallons) 2, 000 

Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons) 2.44 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) 520 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) $5 . 35 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) $9.83 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon (cents; 8. 04 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 32 

Average pressure at consumers' meters 8 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 5 

Mini mum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 8 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F.) 55 

Total number regular meter customers 568 

Total number prepaid meter customers 82 

Total number all customers 650 

♦1927 — Succeeded by Elizabeth Gas and Suburban Company and Henderson and Oxford Gas Co. 



144 



N; C. Corporation Commission 



SOUTHERN POWER COMPANY 

Incorporated March 1905, under General Laws of New Jersey. 

Main Office: Charlotte. 

Officers, (1927): President, G. G. Allen, New York; Vice-President, B. N. Duke, New York; Vice- 
President, W. R. Perkins, New York; Vice-President, W. S. Lee, Charlotte; N. A. Cocke, Charlotte; 
Vice-President, Chas. J. Burkholder, Charlotte; Secretary and Treasurer, W. C. Parker, New York. 

Electricity wholesaled in the following towns and cities: Albemarle, Benton Heights, Boiling Springs, 
Cherryville, Concord, Cornelius, Catawba, Dallas, Davidson, Ellenboro, Forest City, Gastonia, 
Huntersville, Kings Mountain, Landis, Lexington, Lincolnton, Lattimore, Maiden, Mocksville, 
Monroe, Mooresboro, Mooresville, Newton, Rutherfordton, Shelby, Statesville, Waxhow, Abbeville, 
S. C, Clinton, S. C, Due West, S. C, Easley, S. C, Greenwood S. C, Greer, S. C, Honea Path, S. C, 
Newberry, S. C, Ninety Six, S. C, Prosperity, S. C, Peckens, S. C, Rock Hill, S. C, Seneca, S. C. 
Westminister, S. C. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1927 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 




$39,699,152.95 

161,501.36 

26,700.00 

8,604,886.68 

64 , 144 . 84 

1,186,434.52 

37,358.89 

5,113,784.00 
130,362.00 




$ 40,700,000.00 






7,000,000.00 




Accounts payable 


576,503.84 




1,212,880.84 






87,500.00 




Advances from affiliated 






338,791.26 


Investments in affiliated 


Casualty and insurance reserve. 

M iscellaneous reserves 

Miscellaneous unadjusted 


280,475.27 
70,000.00 


Miscellaneous investments 


6,250.00 




Profit and loss — surplus 

Total _ 


4,751,923.40 


Total 


$55,024,325.24 


$ 55,024,325.24 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 

1926 1927 

Total operating revenue $13,266,641.87 $14,962,502.77 

Total operating expenses 10 , 247 , 030 . 40 10, 376 ,415 . 77 



Southern Power Co. 



145 



STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC PLANT AT END OF 

YEAR 



YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING 



Rated capacity in kilowatts of generators installed — steam 

Rated capacity in kilowatts of generators installed — hydraulic 

Number of hours plant was operated during year 

Number of kilowatt hours generated during year — steam 

Number of kilowatt hours generated during year — hydraulic 

Average number of kilowatt hours generated per hour in operation 

Maximum 15-minute load on plant during year, in kilowatts 

Number of kilowatt hours received from other companies 

Total K.W.H. generated and received (4+5+9) 

K.W.H. used in station and station loss 

K.W.H. delivered to transmission system (10 — 11) 

K.W.H. loss in transmission and transformation 

Per cent transmission and transformation (loss 13-^12) 

K.W.H. delivered at consumers' premises — sales (15 — 16) 

K.W.H. delivered transmission system by steam plant 

Pounds of coal consumed (including banking) in producing above 

power 

Average number of pounds of coal consumed per K. W. H. delivered 

to transmission system 

B.T.U. per pound of coal 

Rated capacity in horsepower of boilers installed 



1926 

174,600 

439,550 

109,698 

682,955,500 

614,532,475 

243,093 

5,337 

95,345,000 

1,392,832,975 

48,859,491 

1,343,975,484 

219,175.10 

17.20 

1,124,798,474 

658,920,300 



1,309,831,840 

1.9 

15,764 



1927 

174,600 

439,978 

109,146 

907,274,100 

603,624,380 

13,849 



48,975,284 

1,559,873,764 

65,923,590 

1,493,950,174 

226,796,852 

15.74 

1,277,153,322 

875,211,850 

1,318,882,360 

1.5 
13,500 
15,764 



146 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



SOUTHERN PUBLIC UTILITIES COMPANY 

Incorporated, March 7, 1913, under the Laws of Maine. 

Main office: Charlotte. 

Officers: President, E. C. Marshall, Charlotte; Vice-President, A. V. Harrill, Charlotte; Vice- 
President, R. L. Peterman, Charlotte; Vice-President, John Paul Lucas, Charlotte; Secretary, W. C 
Parker, New York; Treasurer, D. G. Calder, Charlotte. 

Electricity retailed in following towns and cities: Charlotte, Winston-Salem, Thomasville, Belmont, 
Mt. Holly, China Grove, Bessemer City, Hiddenite, Hickory, Paw Creek, Hoskins, Reidsville, Mat- 
thews, Salisbury, Rockwell, Cooleemee Icard, Hildebran, Connelly Springs, Rutherford College, 
Grove Mt. Airy, Elkin, New London, Norwood, Spencer, East Spencer, Kernersville, Marshville, 
Cleveland, Indian Trail, Madison, Wingate, Taylorsville, King, Pinnacle, Rural Hall, N. Wilkesboro, 
Denton, Stoneville, Wilkesboro, Troutman, Conover, Ronda, Hendersonville, Tuxedo, Saluda, Tryon, 
Columbus, Mill Springs. 

Gas plant operated in Charlotte. 

Street Railways operated in Charlotte and Winston-Salem. 



BALANCE SHEET— 1927 



Assets 




Liabilities 




Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 




$25,906,222.38 

279,848.66 

5,182.00 

1,748,872.23 

5,858.76 

606,835.41 

16,333.00 

122,125.00 

22,457.10 

23,340.78 

3,478.88 

455,648.41 

4,601,318.37 

27,828.40 




$ 10,827,500 00 


Cash 




9,859,000 00 






13,500.00 






4,964,673.69 






230,623.69 






162,412.50 




Miscellaneous current liabilities 


75,947.71 


Prepayments 


396,989.73 




10,778.42 






4 , 172 , 936 . 78 


Miscellaneous special funds 


Casualty and insurance reserve 
Profit and loss — surplus 

Total... 


701,282.24 
2,409,704.62 


Unamortized debt expense 

Miscellaneous suspense 

Reacquired securities bonds 




Total 


$33,825,349.38 


$ 33,825,349.38 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— All Plants 



Total operating revenue.. 
Total operating expenses. 



1926 



$5,679,347.20 
4,185,626.80 



1927 



$ 6,776,109.88 
5,045,971.90 



Southern Public Utilities Co. 



147 



ELECTRIC OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 



Charlotte 

Winston-Salem 

Thomas ville 

Belmont 

Mt. Holly 

China Grove 

Bessemer City 

Hickory 

Paw Creek 

Hoskins 

Reids ville 

Matthews 

Salisbury 

Rockwell District .. 

Icard 

Hildebran 

Connelly Springs 

Rutherford College 

Grover 

Mt. Airy 

Elkin 

Norwood 

Spencer 

Kerners ville 

Marsh ville 

East Spencer 

Cleveland 

Indian Trail 

Wingate 

Taylors vill e 

New London 

Madison 

King 

North Wilkesboro 

Troutman 

Conover 

Hendersonville Group. 
Tryon 



1926 



Revenue 



1,102,927 

825,568 

116,086 

21,987 

19,172 

6,833. 

17,843, 

165,614. 

1,458. 

7,265. 

102,176. 

3,753. 

102,729. 

9,311. 

2,306. 

1,375. 

1,150. 

1,601. 

3,754. 

37,785. 

12,906. 

7,269. 

2,885. 

11,178. 

13,049. 

742. 

2,235. 

350. 

904. 

743. 



Expense 



619,701 

537,428 

93,789 

16 , 136 

14,843 

6,432 

12,289, 

112,691. 

1,059. 

4,217. 

81,537. 

4,554. 

155,960. 

9,482. 

3,090. 

1,507. 

1,250. 

1,711. 

4,437. 

28,005. 

10,407. 

6,668. 

5,479. 

9,764. 

12,142. 

1,392. 

1,698. 

329. 

378. 

419. 



1927 



(4) 



(5) 



(6) 



Revenue 



,300,322.04 

975,038.48 

126,718.04 

27,038.17 

20,963.56 

10,685.45 

20,863.74 

192,227.54 

10,936.86 

119,933.43 

7,888.68 

166,534.18 

20,586.40 

12,589.17 



Expense 



5,448.81 

119,685.97 

36,499.58 

12,151.64 



30,046.53 
33,295.18 



,509.56 



(4) 



(5) 



(6) 



730,518.33 

655,264.56 

106,412.68 

19,997.84 

14,098.39 

10,457.67 

17,358.27 

139,904.24 

6,768.90 

94,159.54 

8,531.63 

198,761.19 

21,710.42 

12,042.16 



4,999.20 
94,437.35 
32,554.25 
10,633.82 



22,910.04 
37,538.53 



11,721.15 



(7) 


14,412.97 


(7) 


11,398.05 




2,657.14 




2,562.92 


(8) 


9,071.16 


(8) 


6,305.23 




5,256.19 




3,506.90 


(9) 


22,257.98 


(9) 


21,567.20 




1,050.64 




1,123.69 




711.27 




325.79 


(10) 


71,536.99 


(10) 


51,134.44 


(11) 


19,165.92 


(11) 


13,128.51 



Total number of customers, 1926: 43,213. 
Total number of customers, 1927: 55,951. 

(1)— Matthews Group; Includes Matthews, Baker and Indian Trail. 

(2) — Salisbury Group; Includes Salisbury and East Spencer. 

(3) — Icard Group. Includes Icard, Hildebran, Connelly Springs and Rutherford College. 

(4) — Elkin Group. Includes Elkin and Ronda. 

(5) — Marsh ville Group. Includes Marshville and Wingate. 

(6) — Cleveland Group. Includes Cleveland and Cooleemee. 

(7)— Taylors ville Group. Includes Taylorsville and Hiddenite. 

(8) — Madison Group. Includes Madison and Stoneville. 

(9) — North Wilkesboro. Includes North Wilkesboro and Maravian Falls. 
<10) — Hendersonville Group. Includes Hendersonville, Tuxedo and Saluda. 
<11) — Tryon Group. Includes Tryon, Columbus and Mill Springs. 



148 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

GAS— OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 





1926 


1927 




Revenue 


Expenses 


Revenue 


Expenses 


Charlotte _ _ 


$ 478,231.65 


$ 288,791.74 


$ 506,499.68 


$ 308,864.51 







STREET RAILWAY -OPERATING REVENUE AMD EXPENSES 





1926 


1927 




Revenue 


Expenses 


Revenue 


Expenses 


Charlotte 


$ 531,205.64 
196,878.28 


$ 


476,033.74 
244,865.74 


$ 550,603.60 
191,002.58 


$ 


495,625.96 


Winston-Salem 


229,800.96 







STATISTICS— ELECTRICITY PURCHASED 



Plant 



1926 



1927 



Charlotte 

Winston-Salem 

Thomasville 

Belmont 

Mt. Holly 

China Grove 

Bessemer City 

Hickory 

Paw Creek 

Hoskins 

Reidsville 

Mathews. _ 

Salisbury 

Rockwell District.. 

Icard... 

Hildebran 

Connelly Springs. _ 
Rutherford College 

Grover 

Mt. Airy 

Elkin.. 

Norwood 

Spencer 

Kerners ville 

Marshville 

East Spencer 

Cleveland 

Indian Trail 

Wingate... 

Taylors ville 

New London 



32,202,226 




37,937,002 


22,709,370 




26,843,582 


4,698,300 




5,177,000 


625,500 




729,600 


551,820 




604,500 


130,570 




275,201 


506,110 




590,350 


4,878,627 




5,756,496 


32,5901 
137,090/ 




228,290 


3,490,300 




4,224,200 


86,206 


(1) 


266,500 


3,287,900 


(2) 


5,011,718 


216,302 




800,586 


123,360 


(3) 


502,256 


28,531 






20,427 






27,398 






138,930 




216,062 


584,600 




2,461,200 


174,890 


(4) 


613,030 


264,940 




422,950 


59,754 
399,000 








926,500 


707,651 


(5) 


1,713,000 


11,134 






85,444 


(6) 


415,329 


16,014 






22 , 549 






3,300 


(7) 


183,423 
97,029 



Southern Public Utilities Co. 

STATISTICS— ELECTRICITY PURCHASED— Continued 



149 



Plant 


1926 


1927 






(8) 
(9) 

(io; 

(11) 


179,900 






98,258 


N. Wilkesboro . 




518,167 






34,600 






13,300 






1,478,198 


Tryon __ 




629 , 322 









ELECTRICITY GENERATED 



Plant 


1926 


1927 


Winston-Salem 

Mt. Airy 

Elkin 

Taylorsville 


4,703,050 

816,220 

191,159 

31,200 


5,355,750 

2,075,420 

581,040 

276,900 

284 , 100 








Total ___ 




8,572,210 









(1) — Mathews Group. Includes Matthews, Baker and Indian Trail. 

(2) — Salisbury Groups. Includes Salisbury and Eats Spencer. 

(3) — Icard Group. Includes Icard, Hildebran, Connelly Springs and Rutherford College. 

(4) — Elkin Group. Includes Elkin and Ronda. 

(5) — Marshville Group. Includes Marshville and Wingate. 

(6) — Cleveland Group. Includes Cleveland and Cooleemee. 

(7) — Taylorsville Group. Includes Taylorsville and Hiddenite. 

(8) — Madison Group. Includes Madison and Stoneville. 

(9) — North Wilkesboro Group. Includes North Wilkesboro and Moravian Falls. 
(10) — Hendereonville Group. Includes Hendersonville, Tuxedo and Saluda. 
(11) — Tryon Group. Includes Tryon, Columbus and Mill Springs. 



150 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



STATISTICS OF GAS PROPERTY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 

Charlottte 



1926 



1927 



Types of gas-making apparatus 

Number of coal gas benches 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Number of water gas sets 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) 

Annual production coal gas (M.C.F.) 

Annual production water gas (M.C.F.) 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C-F.) 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Per cent unaccounted for (M.C.F.) '__ 

Tons of coal carbonized during year (tons) 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons) 

By-products made: 

Coke (tons) 

Tar (gallons) --_ 

Average yield during year per pound of coal carbonized (cubic feet) 

Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons) __ 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon (cents) 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Minimum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F ) 

Total number regular meter customers 

Total number prepaid meter customers 

Total number all customers 



Coal- 



— Carbure 


tted Water 


8 


8 


800 


800 


3 


3 


1,300 


1,300 


2,100 


2,100 


940 


940 


300 


300 


178,259 


140,480 


127,554 


174,379 


305,813 


314,859 


274,311 


290,210 


31,502 


24,649 


10.3 


7.83 


10,117 


11,502 


585,060 


689,897 


6,579 


7,544 


276,031 


343,581 


8.81 


6.11 


4.59 


3.9& 


5.40 


5.40 


$5.48 


$5.30 


$4.00 


$4.00 


7.29 


7.37 


100.7 


89 


4 


4 


6 


6 


33^ 


3H 


1,074 


1,091 


6,445 


6,755 


41 


45 


6,486 


6,800 



Southern Public Utilities Co. 



151 



STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAYS AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATION 

DURING YEAR 
Charlotte 



1926 



1927 



Number of kilowatt hours purchased during year 

Total K.W.H. delivered to railway feeders during year 

Maximum 2-minute peak or demand on railway feeders during year.. 
Number of rotary converters and motor generator sets 

Rated K.W.H. capacity 

Number of hours railway operated during year 

Total number of revenue passengers carried during year 

Average number of cars operated 

Total car miles operated during year 

Number of passenger cars owned (motor) 

Number of cars owned (work) 

Total all cars owned 

Miles of first main track (route miles) 

Miles of second main track (miles of double track) 

Miles of sidings, crossovers, car-house and storage track 

Total track mileage 



5,162,049 

2,000 

4 

1,850 

6,900 

8,246,519 

34 

1,962,752 

51 

4 

55 

29.30 

9.73 

.07 

39.10 



5,084,507 

5,084,507 

2,000 

4 

1,850 

6,900 

8,538,030 

35 

1,985,417 

42 

4 

46 

39.10 

9.73 

.07 

48.90 



Winston-Salem 




1927 



Number of kilowatt hours purchased during year 

Maximum 2-minute peak or demand on railway feeders during year. 

Number of rotary converters and water generator sets 

Rated K.W. Capacity 

Number of hours railway operated during year 

Total number of revenue passengers carried during year 

Average number of cars operated 

Total car miles operated during year 

Number passenger cars owned (motor) 

Number of work cars owned 

Total number of cars owned 

Miles first main track (route miles) 

Miles of sidings, cross overs, car-house and storage track 

Total track mileage 



1,200 

2 

1,000 

6,552 

,013,375 

17 

724,052 

31 

2 

33 

9.86 

.935 

10.795 



2,250,080 

1,200 

2 

1,000 

6,282 

2,919,649 

20 

401,673 

32 

2 

34 

9.86 

.935 

10.795 



152 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



TIDE WATER POWER COMPANY 

Incorporated February 26, 1907, under Laws of North Carolina, Chapter 183 Private Laws, 1907. 

Main office: Wilmington, N. C. 

Officers: President, F. W. Woodcock, New York, Executive Vice-President, F. A. Matthes, Wil- 
mington; Vice-President, Raymond Hunt, Wilmington; Vice-President, J. V. Grainger, Wilmington; 
Vice-President, T. R. Crumley, New York; Vice-President, W. L. Bryde, New York; Vice-President, 
Milward Oliver, New York; Treasurer, Milward Oliver, New York; Secretary, C. A. McClure, New 
York; Asst. Secretary, R. L. Hook, New York; Asst Secretary, G. P. Wylly, Jr., Wilmington; Asst. 
Treasurer, F. A. Davis, New York; Asst. Treasurer, G. P. Wylly, Jr., Wilmington; Asst. Treasurer, 
W. E. Shaw, Jr., Yew York. 

Electricity retailed for lighting in the following cities and towns: Wilmington, Burgaw, Wallace, 
Rose Hill, Warsaw, Willard, Teachey, Carolina Beach, Wrightsville Beach, Seagate, Wrightsville 
Sound, Castle Hayne, Currie, Atkinson, Rocky Point, Leland, Delco, Magnolia, Turkey, Bowden, 
Faison, Calypso, Kenansville, Beulahville, Chinquapin, Richlands, Bolton, Lake Waccamaw, Hallsboro, 
Whiteville, Chadbourn, Evergreen, Cerro Gordo, Fair Bluff, Clarkton, White Lake, Elizabethtown, 
Garland, Tabor. 

Gas plants operated at Wilmington, Wrightsville Beach, Seagate, Wrightsville Sound. 

Street Railways operated at Wilimgton, Wightsville Beach, Seagate, Wrightsville Sound. 





BALANCE 


SHEET— 1927 




Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 




$ 6,536,203.19 

69,780.15 

1,709.50 

282,596.54 

9,930.81 

134,190.82 

4,812.93 

18,525,869.13 

70,644.66 

134,242.22 

172,029.98 

1,502,424.80 

2,309.70 

24.80 

222,291.20 




$ 7,352,050.00 






15,293,950.00 






204,880.00 






34,949.46 






52,714.43 




Miscellaneous current liabilities 


3,102.64 


Material and supplies 


15,445.44 






282,387.33 


Investments in affiliated 


Miscellaneous accrued liabilities 
Advances from affiliated 


1,144.09 




2,531,671.47 






557,138.31 




Casualty and insurance reserve 
Contributions for extensions 


35,940.98 


Unamortized debt expense 


18,026.55 
41,929.09 


Miscellaneous suspense 


Miscellaneous unadjusted 


501.57 




Profit and loss — surplus 

Total _ 


1,253,229.07 


Total 


$27,669,060.43 


$ 27,669,060.43 











OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— All Divisions 



1926 



1927 



Total operating expenses. 
Total operating expenses. 



1,245,725.58 
609,669.09 



1,313,667.56 
637,070.67 



Tidewater Power Co. 
electric— operating revenue and expenses 



153 



1926 



1297 



Total operating revenue- 
Total operating expenses 
Total number customers. 



780,911.82 
356,350.57 

8,775 



861,065.13 
420,001.34 
9,793 



GAS— OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 







1926 




1927 




$ 


208,859.61 
139,791.20 


$ 


217,625.67 




124,751.79 







STREET RAILWAY— OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 





1926 


1927 




$ 


255,954.15 
201,700.34 


$ 


234,976.76 




172,675.26 







STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC PLANT AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING 

YEAR 





1926 


1927 




11,800 

8,760 

24,492,208 

2,796 

6,000 

46.6 

50,000 

24,542,208 

757,760 


11,500 


Number of hours plant was operated during year 


8,760 


Number of kilowat hours generated during year — steam 


26,167,662 


Average number of kilowatt hours generated per hour in operation 


, 2,987 
6,600 




45 


Number of kilowatt hours received from other companies 


84,000 




26,251,662 




1,082,400 


K.W.H. delivered to transmission system (10—11) 


25,169,262 


K.W.H. loss in transmission and transformation 




3,243,588 


Per cent transmission and transformation 




12.9 


K.W.H. delivered distribution system 


24,542,208 
3,073,396 
12.5 
21,468,812 
24,492,208 
50,028,254 

2.04 

10 

14,200 

28,968 

200 

3,471 




K.W.H. lost in distribution and otherwise unaccounted for 




Per cent distribution loss and otherwise unaccounted for 




K.W.H. delivered at consumers' premises — sales (15—16) 


21,925,674 


K.W.H. delivered transmission system by steam plant 


25,085,262 


Pounds of coal consumed (including banking) in producing above power 

Average number of pounds of coal consumed per K.W.H. delivered to 

transmission system 


51,501,295 
2.053 


Pounds of water evaporated per pound of coal consumed 


10 


B.T.U. per pound of coal 


14,000 


B.T.U. in coal per K.W.H. delivered transmission system (21 X 23) 

Working pressure of steam in boilers 


28,742 
200 


Rated capacity in horsepower of boilers installed . 


2,412 







154 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATION 

DURING YEAR 



1926 



1927 



Number of kilowatt hours purchased during year (K.W.H.) 

Number of rotary converters and motor-generator sets 

Rated K.W. capacity 

Number of hours railway operated during year 

Total number of revenue passengers carried during year 

Average number of cars operated 

Total car hours operated during year 

Total car miles operated during year 

Number of passenger cars owned (motor) 

Number of passenger cars owned (trail) 

Number of freight and express cars owned 

Total all cars owned 

Miles of first main track (route miles) 

Miles of second main track (miles of double track) 

Miles of sidings, crossovers, car-house and storage track 

Total track mileage 

Miles of single track paved by railway company 

Miles of double track paved by railway company 



153,760 


1,812,988 


5 


4 


2,200 


1,600 


6,935 


11,865 


382,880 


2,167,503 


24 


35 


92,867 


100,387 


877,693 


857,259 


36 


37 


4 


7 


14 


9 


54 


53 


2,183 


2,183 


9.40 


9.40 


182 


182 


33.05 


33.05 


73 


73 


4.44 


5.17 



STATISTICS OF GAS PROPERTY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 



Types of gas-making apparatus 

Number of coal gas benches _ 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Number of water gas sets 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Annual production coal gas (M.C.F.) 

Annual production water gas (M.C.F.) 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) ^ 

Total gas delivered to mains (M.C.F.) 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Per cent unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Tons of coal carbonized during year (tons) 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons) 

By-products made: 

Coke (tons) 

Tar (gallons) 

Average yield during year per pound of coal carbonized (cubic feet)_. 
Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons) 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) • 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon (cents) 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Minimum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F.) 

Total number regular meter customers 

Total number prepaid meter customers 

Total number all customers 



1926 



Coal and 


Water 


3 


18 


210 


180 


2 


2 


1,505 


1,505 


1,750 


1,685 


270 


270 


66,472 


62,701 


67,458.3 


76,696 


133,950.5 


139,397 


133,972.5 


139,399.8 


110,541.8 


114,468.2 


1,569.2 


1,147.7 


21,861.5 


23,783.9 


16.3 


17.1 


6,531 


6,463.7 


196,636 


194,122 


4,128.8 


4,116.4 


66,091 


69,299 


5.10 
2.96 




1.39 


5.39 


5.40 


$ 5.70 


$5.70 


7.5 


7.1 


50 


61.2 


4 


5 


6 


6 


3H 


4 


590 




3,101 


3,192 


44 


44 


3,154 


3,236 



1927 



Virginia Electric and Power Co. 



155 



VIRGINIA ELECTRIC AND POWER COMPANY 

Incorporated June 29, 1909, under General Laws of Virginia. 

Main office: Richmond, Va. 

Officers: President, W. E. Wood, Richmond, Va.; Vice-President, J. F. McLoughlin, Richmond; 
Vice-President, T. P. Walker, Norfolk; Vice-President, T. Justin Moore, Richmond; Vice-President, 
G. H. Clifford, Boston, Mass; Secretary, W. T. Crawford, Boston, Mass.; Treasurer, Henry B. Sawyer, 
Boston, Mass.; Comptroller, G. B. Williams, Richmond. 

This company serves practically all of Tidewater, Virginia and Northeastern North Carolina with 
electric energy for both lighting and power, including the cities of Richmond, Norfolk, Petersburg, 
Portsmouth, Suffolk, Fredericksburg, Ashland, Williamsburg, and Hopewell, Va., and Roanoke 
Rapids, Weldon and Rosemary, N. C, and contiguous territory. 

Towns and cities in wnich electricity is wholesaled for resale; Wakefield, Franklin, Weaverly, Vir- 
ginia Beach and Windsor, Va., and Murfreesboro, Elizabeth City, Hertford, Edenton, Scotland Neck 
and Winfall, North Carolina. 

Electric Railways operated in Richmond, Petersburg, Norfolk and Portsmouth, Va. and interurban 
street railway between Richmond and Petersburg. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1927 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1927 




$67,587,542.59 

1,324,787.34 

52,330.14 

1,024,662.18 

1,763.70 
845,533.56 
250,028.99 
103,861.00 

2,000.00 

1,947,568.06 
33,766.38 

4,781,373.29 
499,501.62 

1,410,409.72 
206,806.99 
196,000.00 
358,000.00 


Capital stock (preferred) 


$ 14,622,300.00 


Cash 


4 , 000 . 00 






39,821,620.18 






1 , 350 , 000 . 00 






303 , 702 . 13 






168,413.50 






28.50 




Preferred stock subscribed for__ 
Miscellaneous current liabilities 


154,677.50 




9 , 902 . 15 




386,370.12 






252,568.87 




Miscellaneous accrued liabilities 
Advances from affiliated 


55 , 047 . 65 


Miscellaneous investments 


18,000.00 






7,317,776.49 


Unamortized debt expense 


Contributions for extension 


10,648.01 
101,723.08 


Reacquired securities — bonds 


Miscellaneous unadjusted 


308,810.57 




Book value stock and earned 


15,740,346.81 




Total 




Total 


$80,625,935.56 


$ 80,625,935.56 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— AH Divisions 





1926 


1927 




$12,881,853,93 
6,755,944.72 


$14,331,422.39 




7,277,409.01 







156 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

ELECTRIC— OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 





1926 


1927 




$ 7,478,485.81 
2,906,684.70 


$ 8,180,131.81 




3,200,818.16 







STREET RAILWAY— OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 





1926 


1927 




$ 5,403,368.12 
3,849,260.02 


$ 6,151,290.58 




4,076,590.85 







ELECTRIC 



NORTH CAROLINA 
OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES 



Total operating revenue.. 
Total operating expenses. 



1926 



409,091.08 
198,465.69 



GROSS REVENUE 





1926 


1927 




$ 196,881.84 

104,583.31 

55,774.14 

41,260.38 

4,455.62 

3,325.37 

2,810.42 


$ 274,408.26 




131,738.55 




61,354.33 




55,677.55 




7,583.05 




5 , 263 . 90 




6,131.79 




1,942.71 






241.80 






1,613.19 






219.38 






299.18 






1,932.34 






115.44 






3,042,11 






5,531.54 






1,228.30 






437.38 












1,501.77 






2,040.29 






9,192.08 






21,225.96 






41,881.76 


Hertford 




5,181.76 








Total . . 


S 409,091.08 


$ 639,783.81 







Virginia Electric and Power Co. 



15T 



STATISTICS OF ELECTRIC PLANT AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING 

YEAR 





1926 


1927 




3,500 

5,600 

8,760 

3,667,066 

25,385,654 

3,207 

6,700 

47.8 

9,749,358 

721,600 

39,583,678 

957,699 

38,565,979 

11,970,600 

26,595,379 

23,633,974 

2,961,405 

11.1 

12,344,000 

3.37 

4 

14,000 

47,180 

400 per sq. 

in gage 

2,131 

1,718 


3,500 


Rated capacity in kilowatts of generators installed — hydraulic 


5,600 
8,760 




260,282 




30,699,359 


Average number of kilowatt hours generated per hour in operation 


3,534 
5,200 




67.9 




24,087,027 


Number of kilowatt hours received from other companies 

Total K.W.H. generated and received (gross) 


2,121,300 
57,167,968 




516,591 


K.W.H. generated and received net . 


56,651,377 




11,128,200 


K.W.H. generated and received for N. C. system _. _ __ _ _ 


45,523,177 


K.W.H. delivered at consumers' premises— Sales 

K.W.H. lost in distribution, etc _ _ _ _ 


41,421,349 
4,101,828 


Per cent distribution, etc. loss 


9 


Pounds of coal consumed (including banking) in producing above power 

Average number of pounds of coal consumed per K.W.H. delivered to 

transmission system _ ______ 


1,473,060 
5.96 




4 


B.T.U. per pound of coal 


14,000 


B.T.U. in coal per K.W.H. generated — steam _ _ _ 


83,440 


Working pressure of steam in boilers . _• 


400 per sq. 


Rated capacity in horsepower of boilers installed (B.H.P.) 

Number of customers 


in gage 
2,131 
3.062 







158 



N. C. Corporation Commission 



^WASHINGTON GAS COMPANY 



Incorporated, October 17, 1917, under General Laws of North Carolina. 
Main office: Washington. 

Officers: (1926), President, R. A. Blackwood, Kinston; Secretary, S. C. Bragaw, Washington; 
Treasurer, R. A. Blackwood, Kinston. 
Gas plant at Washington. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1926 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 




$ 192,652.38 
4,529.90 
7,326.82 

655.25 
2,455.19 
1,001.40 

784.08 
6,137.50 
1,998.14 




$ 50 , 000 . 00 


Cash 


Premium on capital stock 


67,257.22 
90.000.00 


Interest and dividends 


Accounts payable 

Consumer's deposits 


1 , 253 . 22 
502 . 34 




15.00 






297.02 






2,250.00 






325.36 




Renewal and replacements 

Profit and loss — surplus 

Total 


5,332.27 




308.23 


Total 


$ 217,540.66 


$ 217,540.66 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— 1926 

Total operating revenue $ 35, 152. 96 

Total operating expenses 25,162.79 



STATISTICS OF GAS PROPERTY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 

1926 

Types of gas-making apparatus 

Number of water gas sets 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) 

Annual production water gas (M.C.F.) , 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Per cent unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 

Tons Cf coal carbonized during year (tons) 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons) 

By-product made, Tar (gallons) 

Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons) 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) 

Average cost of gas oil used per gallon (cents) 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Minimum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F.) 

Total number regular meter customers 

Total number prepaid meter customers 

Total number all customers 

*1927 — Owned and operated by Carolina Gas and Electric Company. 



Water 

2 

200 

200 

60 

120 

17,779 

17,779 

14,281 

30 

3,198 

18 

444 

55,739 

5,000 

3.1 

540 

$5.65 

$7.65 

7.5 

12 

3 

3.5 

.2.5 

100 

532 

98 

630 



Winstom-Salem Gas Co. 



159 



*WINSTON-SALEM GAS COMPANY 

Incorporated July 1, 1912, under General Laws of North Carolina. 
Main office: Winston-Salem. 

Officers: President, W. S. Barston, Winston-Salem; Vice-President, G. A. Arouson, Winston-Salem; 
Treasurer, J. P. Campbell, Winston-Salem; Secretary, C. N. Wilson, Winston-Salem. 
Gas plant at Winston-Salem. 

BALANCE SHEET— 1926 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 


Title of Account 


Balance at 

End of Year 

1926 




$ 1,083,905.11 

1,043.96 

75,486.92 

33,826.13 

1,265.12 

300.00 

1,672.17 

33,075.90 

250,000.00 

17,000.00 


Capital stock 


$ 350,300.00 


Cash . _. 


750,300.00 




Notes payable 

Accounts payable 


240,500.00 




24,397.30 




12,608.56 




Miscellaneous current liabilities 


3,553.15 




9 , 624 . 36 






7.00 


Treasury securities — bonds 


Miscellaneous accrued liabilities 


67.10 
56,614.78 






5,797.49 




Profit and loss — surplus 

Total _.- . _ 


43,805.47 


Total 


$ 1,497,575.31 


$ 1,497,575.31 









OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES— 1926 

Total operating revenue $ 92,959.46 

Total operating expepses 48,957.31 



160 N. C. Corporation Commission 

STATISTICS OF GAS PROPERTY AT END OF YEAR AND OPERATIONS DURING YEAR 

Types of gas-making apparatus Coal and 

Water 

Number of coal gas benches 6 

Total rated generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 360 

Number of water gas sets 1 

Total rated generating capacity (M .C.F. per day) 250 

Total plant generating capacity (M.C.F. per day) 610 

Total holder capacity (M.C.F.) 240 

Total rated steam boiler capacity (H.P.) 240 

Annual production coal gas (M.C.F.) 59,963 

Annual production water gas (M.C.F.) j 3,631 

Total gas manufactured, all kinds (M.C.F.) 63,594 

Total gas delivered to mains (M.C.F.) 63,594 

Total gas sales to consumers (M.C.F.) 49,928 

Total gas used by company (M.C.F.) 151 

Total gas unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 13,518 

Per cent unaccounted for (M.C.F.) 212 

Tons of coal carbonized during year (tons) 4,996 

Gallons of gas oil used during year (gallons) 12,908 

By-products made: 

Coke (tons) 3,497 

Tar (gallons) 44,060 

Average yield during year per pound of coal carbonized (cubic feet) 6 

Average gallons of oil used per M.C.F. of gas manufactured (gallons) 3}4 

Average calorific value of gas (B.T.U.) 540 

Average cost of coal delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) $5. 85 

Average cost of coke delivered per ton (2000 lbs.) $5.00 

Total miles of gas mains (miles) 76. 39 

Average pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 5 

Maximum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 7 

Minimum pressure at consumers' meters (inches) 4 

Maximum day (24 hours) send-out during year (M.C.F.) 441 

Total number all customers 2,675 

*1927 — Owned and operated by X. C. Public Service Company. 



Electric Light and Power Companies 161 

ELECTRIC LIGHT AND POWER COMPANIES 



Operating Revenues 



Minor Companies 



Blowing Rock Light and 

Power Co 

Blowing Rock, N. C. 
Brevard Light and Power Co... 

Brevard, N. C. 
Burnsville Electric Co 

Burnsville, N. C. 
Caldwell Power Co 

Morgantown, N. C. 
Carolina-Tennessee Power Co. . 

Murphy, N. C. 
Cascade Power Co. 

Brevard, N. C. 
Catawba Valley Light and 
Power Co ^. 

Morgantown, N. C. 
Dallas Rural Light Co 

Dallas, N. C. 
Dillsboro and Sylva Electric 
Light Co 

Dillsboro, N. C. 
Elk Park Electric Light and 
Power Co 

Elk Park, N. C. 
Guilwood Light and Power Co. 

Concord, N. C. 
Grift on Electric Co 

Grifton, N. C. 
Hillsboro Power and Light Co._ 

Hillsboro, N. C. 
Hayesville Electric Co 

Hayesville, N. C. 
Laurel Hill Electric Co 

Laurel Hill, N. C. 
Leaksville Light and Power Co. 

Leaksville, N. C. 
*Madison Light and Power Co. - 

Marshall, N. C. 
Marion Light and Power Co. .- 

Marion, N. C. 
Maravian Power Co 

Maravian Falls, N. C. 
Mountain Retreat Association . 

Montreat, N. C. 
Neuse River Elec Co 

Kinston, N. C. 

Northwest Carolina Utilities 

Rocky River Power and 

Light Co 

High Falls, N. C. 
St. Pauls Power Co 

St. Pauls, N. C. 



1926 



S 18,253.48 



1927 



Operating Expenses 



1926 



10,747.87 
80,526.01 
24,456.59 
14,418.47 

77,104.35 
474.60 

14,242.31 

2,043.35 
150.00 

6,744.12 

18,932.30 

26.75 

2,334.34 
70,740.86 
10,426.69 
29,107.57 

5,904.12 

5,265.99 
19,677.37 



7,182.00 
14,198.32 



S 21,367.35 
28,993.95 
10,083.89 
84,309.32 

1 18,617.83 
15,069.16 

84,981.56 
644.86 

15,767.79 

1,010.39 
149.95 



22,467.41 
2,445.51 
3,116.69 

70,980.18 



34,158.75 



5,092.37 



7,809.59 
10,281.00 
12,203.47 



$ 17,446.72 



4,880.00 
23,624.15 

27,080.48 



1927 



$ 21,853.85 

14,964.66 

4,380.00 

44,950.00 

25,773.81 



11,505.06 12,304.54 



24,286.58 
257.26 

6,962.38 

2,043.35 
150.00 

3,724.35 

14,890.30 

214.32 

1,783.25 
66,474.10 
10,025.10 
22,153.35 

5,277.72 

5,265.99 
21,412.91 



7,182.00 
21,467.31 



1927 



62,243.20 
408.11 

10,228.67 

829.44 
28.10 



17,113.51 
3,115.93 
2,525.97 

65,213.22 



28,071.34 



3,160.70 



6,190.13 
7,712.59 
15,485.56 



Kilowatt Hrs, 
Generated 



392,450 
490,000 



38,320 



30,000 



700,000 
50,000 
t75,000 



t475,000 



Kilowatt Hrs. 
Purchased 



450,000 
240,000 



17,215,000 



10,757,886 
8.070 

180,000 

1,800 
1,198 



456,100 



68,073 
1,087,000 
f250,000 



f36,000 



250,000 



241,000 



162 N. C. Corporation Commission 

ELECTRIC LIGHT AND POWER COMPANIES— Continued 





Operating Revenues 


Operating Expenses 


1927 


Minor Companies 


1926 


1927 


1926 


1927 


Kilowatt Hrs. 
Generated 


Kilowatt Hra. 
Purchased 


**Troutman Light and Power 
Co 


4,374.39 

530.46 

14,163.65 

6,984.42 




4,521.94 

332.66 

11,381.99 

5,418.00 








Troutman, N. C. 
Warren Plains Electric Co 










Warren Plains, N. C. 


16,330.87 


9,712.48 


150,000 




Spring Hope, N. C. 

Sprucepine Electric Co - 

Sprucepine, N. C. 




3,526.23 


2,667.58 


50,000 


37,200 


Newland, N. C. 









'Acquired by Northwest Carolina Utilities, Inc., August 1, 1927. 
'*Quit operation in 1927 
fEstimated. 



Electric Light and Power Companies 
Electric Energy Production — 1927 

(Companies Operating in North Carolina) 


163 




North Carolina 


South Carolina 


Hydro 


Steam 


Hydro 


Steam 




$ 15,546,100 

4,623,200 

2,161,600 

1,210.105 

651,700 

1,693,200 

1,312,700 

9,106,200 

15,186,300 

11,807,600 

97,418,100 


$ 


$ 


S 


Carolina Power and Light Co.: 








































































Blewitt 










37,679,100 

115,363,000 

65,900 




























2,392,320 










225,700 






3,482 

1,238,600 
1,917,000 
1,913,000 
7,080,000 






Duke Power Co. (1 month): 

Mt. Holly -. 
























Buck _ 










3,001,800 
5,282,000 
8,369,000 
10,751,000 
1,285,700 
2,114,400 






Rhodhiss 
































Tuxedo 












11,036,000 

14,931,200 

4,402,200 

12,165,000 

3,839,300 

11,668,000 

27,919,000 

6,520,000 

81,300 

114,520 

20,840 

90,700 

503,300 












Great Falls ._. 
































Wateree 








Ninety-nine 








Spencer Mt 








Gun Powder No. 1. -. 
























Van Patton 








Durham Public Service Co.: 

Durham 




160,000 

4,185,000 
175,807,100 
133,404,000 
160,297,000 
421,900,000 




Southern Power Co. (11 months): 






Mt. Holly 








Eno 








Tiger __ 








Buck.._ 








Bridgewater 


23,787,500 
32,383,000 

























164 N. C. Corporation Commission 

ELECTRIC ENERGY PRODUCTION, 1927— Continued 






North Carolina 


South Carolina 




Hydro 


Steam 


Hydro 


Steam 


Southern Power Co. — Continued 
Lookout Shoals 


41,127,000 

49,739,000 

1,415,600 

1,793,600 








Mountain Island 
















Tuxedo 














11,731,000 


New Catawba 






65,508,000 

65,605,500 

43,934,600 

42,557,000 

16,320,000 

65,995,000 

110,319,000 

37,680,000 

3,570,500 

627,030 

162,640 

511,100 

308,300 

739,600 










Great Falls 






















































Gun Powder No. 1 






































Tidewater Water Power Co.: 




26,167,662 














Hydro 


Steam 


Virginia 




Hydro 


Steam 


Virginia Electric and Power Co. 
Richmond-N. C. Plants 


30,699,359 
2,450,770 


260,282 


92,256,146 


290,132,932 










Totals 


$ 374,916,534 


$1,087,441,126 


$ 639,385,776 


$ 304,481,952 





Recapitulation 


Hydro 


Steam 


Total 


North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Virginia 


$ 374,916,534 

547,129,630 

92,256,146 


$1,087,441,126 

14,349,020 

290,132,932 


$1,462,357,660 
561,478,650 
382,389,078 


Totals 


$1,014,302,310 


$1,391,923,078 


$2,406,225,388 



Electric Light and Power Companies 
gas production, etc., 1927 



165 





Cubic Feet 
Produced 


Miles 
Mains 


Coal 

Carbonized 

Tons 


Oil Used 
Gallons 


By Products 






Tar 
Gallons 


Coke 
Tons 


Number 
Customers 


Carolina Power and Light Co. 


177,808,000 
92,065,900 
94,197,000 

137,919,000 


73.9 
53.8 
38.3 

88 


11,536.9 
5,664.8 
8,283 


185,410 
101,799 


156,559 
69,613.9 
82,830 
1,015 


7,157.4 
3,678.4 
5,387 


3,944 


Durham .. 


2,505 




2,526 


Carolina Gas and Electric Co. 


422,714 


3,785 


Greenville 






Washington 
































































Fayetteville. 
















Concord and Kannapolis 
Gas Co... ' 


29,085,000 


30 


2,262 


1,339 


22,615 


1,470 


991 


Concord. 




















Elizabeth and Suburban 
Gas Co.... 


9,058,000 

29,536,000 

9,965,500 
495,116,000 


15.5 

29.9 

32 
256.07 




21,671 

84,005 

21,966 
308,251 






712 


Gastonia and Suburban 
Gas Co. 




8,400 




981 


Henderson and Oxford 
Gas Co„ 




662 


N. C. Public Service Co 

Burlington 


33,230' 


377,018 


22,654 


10,879 


















Salisbury 
















Winston-Salem. ._ 
















Southern Public Utilities Co. 
Charlotte 


314,859,000 
139,397,000 


89 
61.2 


11,502 
6,463.7 


689,897 
194,122 


343,581 
69,299 


7,544 
4,116.4 


6,800 


Tidewater Power Co 


3,236 


Wilmington 




Wrightsville Beach 
















Wrightsville Sound 
















Seagate 
































Totals 


1,529,005,000 


729.37 


70,659.6 


1,931,173 


1,048,100.9 


46,620.2 


36,991 







166 N. C. Corporation Commission 

STREET RAILWAYS— PASSENGERS CARRIED AND MILES TRACK— 1927 



Number Revenue 

Passengers 

Carried 



Miles of 
Track 



Carolina Power and Light Company: 

Raleigh 

Asheville 

Durham Public Service Company: 

Durham 

New Bern-Ghent Street Railway: 

New Bern 

North Carolina Public Service Company. 
Greensboro 

Salisbury 

High Point (Busses only) 

Southern Public Utilities Co. : 

Winston-Salem.. 

Charlotte- 

Tidewater Power Company 



2,386,605 
5,695,758 

2,401,432 

7,795 
2,780,305 



14.46 
20.79 



5.67 



3.67 
26.65 



2,919,649 
8,538,030 
2,167,503 



10.795 

48.90 

33.05 



Total- 



26,897,077 



163.985 



168 



N.' C. Corporation Commission 



Telephone and 

STATISTICS FOR CALENDAR YEAR 



Name of Company 



Location of Exchange 



Major Companies: 

Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Co. 



Tarboro 

Ahoskie 

Aulander 

Ayden 

Beaufort 

Benson 

Clayton 

Clinton 

Dunn 

Elm City 

Enfield 

Farmville 

Fayette ville 

Franklinton 

Greenville 

Henderson 

Jackson 

Kenly 

Kinston 

LaGrange 

Lillington 

Littleton 

Louisburg 

Macon 

Maxton 

Morehead City.. 

Murfreesboro 

Nashville 

New Bern 

Norlina 

Oxford 

Pinetops 

Plymouth 

Pollock ville 

Raeford 

Red Springs 

Roanoke Rapids_ 

Rocky Mount 

Scotland Neck__ 

Smithfield 

Snow Hill 

Spring Hope 

Tarboro 

Wake Forest 

Warrenton 

Washington 

Weldon 

Whitakers 

Williamston 

Wilson 



Telephone and Telegraph Companies 



169 



Telegraph Companies 

ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1927 



Plant Equipment 


Operating 
Revenue 


Operating 
Expenses 


Number of Phones 




and Other Assets 


Business 


Residence 


Miles of Wire 


$ 3,756,094.59 


$ 1,192,513.37 


$ 856,968.92 


9,900 

126 

25 

76 

100 

79 

71 

145 

272 

40 

114 

98 

932 

48 

521 

595 

26 

31 

663 

35 

49 

65 

133 

14 

60 

228 

43 

80 

727 

25 

244 

25 

70 

32 

69 

39 

204 

894 

103 

165 

40 

50 

357 

48 

68 

544 

228 

100 

102 

1,011 


16,461 

80 

17 

137 

112 

119 

123 

179 

433 

94 

218 

182 

1,222 

93 

819 

767 

20 

51 

1,067 

103 

50 

146 

221 

52 

153 

187 

68 

115 

1,100 

61 

460 

43 

78 

19 

144 

100 

318 

2,575 

219 

314 

48 

91 

573 

143 

264 

882 

240 

4 

185 

1,671 


55,154 











































































































































































































































































































































































































170 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

STATISTICS— FOR CALENDAR YEAR 



Name of Company 



Major Companies — Continued 

Interstate Telephone and Telegraph Co 

North State Telephone Co 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Co 



Location of Exchange 



Windsor 

Winton 

Youngs ville 

Durham 

High Point 

Atlanta, North Carolina 

Apex _ 

Arden._ _. __ 

Ashe ville 

Belmont 

Bessemer City 

Black Mountain 

Blowing Rock 

Burlington 

Canton 

Caroleen 

Cary 

Charlotte 

Cherryville 

Cleveland 

Davidson 

Fairmont 

Forest City 

Gastonia 

Gibson 

Goldsboro 

Greensboro 

Grover 

Hamlet 

Henderson ville 

Kings Mountain 

Laurinburg 

Lenoir 

Lincolnton 

Lumberton 

Maiden 

Morganton 

Mount Holly 

Mount Olive 

Murphy 

Newland 

Newton 

Raleigh 

Reidsville. 

Rockingham 

Rowland 

Rutherf ordton 

Salisbury — 

Selma 



Telephone and Telegraph Companies 

ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1927— Continued 



171 



Plant Equipment 


Operating 
Revenue 


Operating 
Expenses 


Number of Phones 




and Other Assets 


Business 


Residence 


Miles of Wire 








59 
12 
11 

1,054 

974 

35,424 

41 

29 

5,268 

96 

57 

94 

15 

736 

174 

43 

27 

6,700 

105 

22 

79 

35 

153 

1,098 

26 

848 

4,320 

18 

270 

479 

121 

157 

304 

207 

340 

46 

298 

105 

83 

86 

17 

168 

3,676 

360 

354 

29 

198 

1,181 

101 


66 
16 
22 

2,780 

2,920 

49,099 

66 

40 

7,160 

143 

62 

124 

10 

1,327 

291 

51 

56 

8,498 

245 

132 

247 

85 

218 

1,387 

75 

1,127 

4,671 

35 

565 

974 

201 

316 

512 

562 

406 

129 

411 

198 

169 

123 

21 

418 

4,168 

531 

415 

68 

289 

23,60 

169 




















$ 608,413.12 


$ 215,203.62 
142,126.67 

4,748,157.62 

4,645.01 

2,415.41 

594,906.97 

12,724.12 

5 , 243 . 03 
14,592.80 

2,084.56 
90,882.33 
24,656.23 

4 , 324 . 39 

2,919.26 

1,111,533.52 

12,980.12 

5,029.50 
12,326.36 

5,479.89 

19,407.14 

139,145.41 

3,682.94 
113,748.53 
542,402.22 

1,635.16 
43,281.09 
81,416.25 
17,387.17 
29,403.30 
30,980.98 
35,334.50 
40,775.37 

5,552.11 
27,122.60 
14,899.11 
14,862.46 
13,474.24 

1,966.91 

19,588.55 

467,820.24 

43,720.38 

43,085.09 

4,468.98 

22,043.97 

155,728.41 

16,497.31 


$ 127,792.49 

86,845.06 

3,822,675.04 

4,654.89 

2,906.33 

545,355.39 

9,618.91 

4,585.41 

13,350.08 

2,098.60 

70,052.61 

18,851.86 

4,873.31 

3,624.23 

810,573.23 

11,770.94 

10,639.62 

9,572.50 

4,398.65 

15,459.76 

109,619.60 

4,036.61 

87,872.77 

424,153.36 

1,845.31 

41,000.95 

88,514.07 

13,941.17 

28,429.57 

23,444.79 

27,626.43 

33,497.52 

4,656.09 

23,189.46 

12,894.25 

11.829.38 

11,416.77 

3,353.36 

17,670.54 

381,731.79 

35,239.41 

31,083.98 

4,045.36 

17,014.93 

133,025.85 

15,289.69 




493,882.06 




14,125,932.60 





















































































































































































172 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

STATISTICS— FOR CALENDAR YEAR 



Name of Company 


Location of Exchange 


Major Companies — Continued 


Shelby 

Southport 

Spruce Pine 

Statesville 




Taylors villo 

Troutman 

Waco 

Waynesville 

Wendell 

Wilmington 




Wrights ville 

Zebulon 







Telephone and Telegraph Companies 

ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1927— Continued 



173 



Plant Equipment 
and Other Assets 



Operating 
Revenue 



Operating 
Expenses 



Number of Phones 



Business 



Residence 



Miles of Wire 



55,717.53 

5,655.50 

9,758.07 

85,885.36 

1,956.23 

8,470.34 

2,313.22 

965.96 

32 , 066 . 26 

5 , 492 . 92 

262,653.06 

405,929.74 

8,188.08 

6,931.43 



40,349.10 
5,014.37 
9,260.09 

64,570.67 
2,412.05 
8,195.78 
2,148.99 
1,131.65 

30,244.29 

5,026.85 

199,512.10 

312,936.90 

10,752.82 
6,650.04 



476 

40 

78 

700 

20 

57 

17 

5 

246 

45 

1,930 

3,272 

34 

59 



612 

36 

41 

1,108 

55 

75 

48 

30 

333 

67 

2,929 

4,442 

92 

78 



$ 7,298,001.28 



$ 4,894.281.51 



47,352 



71.260 



174 



N, C. Corporation Commission 

STATISTICS— FOR CALENDAR YEAR 



Name of Company 



Location of Exchange 



Minor Companies: 

Albemarle Telephone Co 

Andrews Telephone Co 

Ansonville Telephone Co 

Appalachian Telephone Co 

Aurora Telephone Co 

Beaverdam Telephone Co 

Bethleham Telephone Co 

Beulaville Telephone Co 

Boiling Springs Telephone Co 

Bonlee Telephone Co. 

Brown Summit Telephone Co 

Carthage Telephone Co 

Camden Telephone Co 

Cane Creek Telephone Co 

Cone Creek Telephone Co 

Coastal Telephone Co 

Catawba Telephone Co 

Cardenas Telephone Co 

Candler Mutual Telephone Co 

Chowan Telephone Co 

Chapel Hill Telephone Co 

Citizens Telephone Co 

City Telephone Co 

Clay County Telephone Co 

Cliffside Telephone Co 

Cahoon Telephone Co 

Concord Telephone Co 

Cooleemee Telephone Co 

Cullowhee Telephone Co 

Davidson Telephone Co 

Deep River Telephone Co 

Denton Telephone Co 

Duplin Telephone Co 

Eagle Springs and McLeans Creek Telephone Co 

East Bend Telephone Co 

East Bend and Donnaha Telephone Co 

Eastern Telephone Co 

Ellenboro Telephone Co • 

Ellerbee Telephone Co 



Albemarle 

Badin 

New London 

Andrews 

Ansonville 

Burns ville 

Aurora 

Lincolnton 

Walnut Cove 

Beulaville 

Boiling Springs __ 

Bonlee 

Goldston 

Pittsboro 

Siler City 

Brown Summit.. 

Carthage 

Old Trap 

Fairview 

Saxapahaw 

Belhaven 

Catawba 

Varina 

Candler 

Tyner 

Chapel Hill 

Brevard 

/Southern Pines. _ 

\ Aberdeen 

Hayes ville 

Cliffside 

Avondale 

Columbia 

Raper 

Concord 

Mount Pleasant. 

Kannapolis 

Cherry Grove - _ . 

Cooleemee 

Cullowhee 

Welcome 

High Point 

Denton 

Warsaw 

Eagle Springs 

East Bend 

East Bend 

Roberson ville 

Bethel 

Ellenboro 

Ellerbee 



Telephone and Telegraph Companies 

ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1927— Continued 



175 



Plant Equipment 


Operating 
Revenue 


Operating 
Expenses 


Number of Phones 




and Other Assets 


Business 


Residence 


Miles of Wire 


$ 45,271.06 


$ 28,807.90 


$ 20,818.22 


235 


414 


202 














2,500.00 

2,000.00 

17,959.18 

2,000.00 

400.00 


3,233.50 

2,520.00 

6,028.35 

2,408.25 

20.00 

61.20 

1,280.25 

81.00 

16,413.78 


3,134.96 

2,280.00 

5,139.89 

2,220.00 

20.00 

61.20 

1,380.00 

420.00 

16,313.78 


29 
14 
63 
23 


81 
126 
57 
59 
16 
27 
42 
55 
370 


42 
300 
330 

43 
5 


280.00 




10 


2,500.00 

700.00 

18,000.00 


13 

4 

173 


60 

12 

348 


























174.00 
5,000.00 
3,000.00 
1,500.00 


60.00 

6,763.72 

1,895.60 

560.00 

712.50 

10,159.82 


60.00 

3,165.00 

1,425.00 

560.60 

712.50 

7,869.94 


2 
53 
20 


3 

206 

51 

26 

175 

83 

91 

112 

169 

33 


10 
75 
25 
12 


3,675.00 




135 


31,220.17 


61 
15 

7 




3,500.00 




4,000.00 
3 , 500 . 00 


3,616.21 
3,715.85 
1,070.00 


3,603.33 
3,044.87 
1,069.13 


110 
126 


750.00 




50 








47,421.01 
18,500.00 


18,359.81 
15,429.03 


16,945.73 
14,313.46 


137 

157 


153 

275 


25 






450.00 
7,302.16 


718.38 
4,661.50 


718.38 
2,251.01 


16 
12 


17 

268 


2^ 
8 


8,000.00 


2,569.33 


2,560.10 


25 


260 


100 




71,576.50 


53,311.13 


548 


1,633 












































1,770.00 
400.00 
400 . 00 


1,118.50 

232.69 

233.25 

1,898.63 

4,200.00 


1,145.50 

232.69 

233.25 

1,802.92 

1,200.00 


6 
2 


14 
48 
40 
70 
90 
37 
25 
16 
345 


-12 

7 
7 


1,750.00 
9,000.00 
1,900.00 


37 

52 


50 

200 

30 


150.00 








15 


156.00 
10,000.00 


33.60 
12,097.25 


30.00 
4,758.25 


1 
70 


10 
425 


3,500.00 
3,000.00 


1,100.00 
1,743.00 


1,100.00 
720.00 


19 
18 


218 
81 


13 
75 



176 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

STATISTICS— FOR CALENDAR YEAR 



Name of Company 



Location of Exchange 



Minor Companies — Continued: 

Ether Rural Telephone Co 

Fairview Telephone Co 

Fairmont-Silver Hill Telephone Co 

Falling Creek Telephone Co 

Farmers Telephone Co 

Farmers Rural Telephone Co 

Forest City-Rutherford Telephone Co 

Forsyth-Davidson Telephone Co 

Fremont Telephone Co 

Fruitland Telephone Co 

Fisher Telephone Co __. 

Granite Telephone Co 

Gibson ville Telephone Co 

Guilford Telephone Co .... 

Hamilton Telephone Co 

Harmony Telephone Co 

Hein's Telephone Co 

Hickory Telephone Co 

Highlands Telephone Co 

Horton Telephone Co 



Hunters ville Telephone Co... 
Hyde County Telephone Co. 
Indian Trail Telephone Co... 
International Telephone Co. . 

Johnston Telephone Co 

Kernersville Telephone Co._. 
Knott's Island Telephone Co 

Lake Lure Telephone Co 

Lattimore Telephone Co 

Lee Telephone Co 

Liecester Telephone Co 

Lexington Telephone Co 

Liberty Telephone Co 

Lilesville Telephone Co 

Linwood Telephone Co 

Lucama Telephone Co 

Madison Telephone Co 

Marion Telephone Co 

Marshville Telephone Co 

Matthews Telephone Co 



Allreds 

Est Bend 

Lexington 

Goldsboro, R. F. D... 

Farmer 

Maxton 

Union Mills 

Winston-Salem 

Fremont 

Pikeville 

Princeton 

Stantonburg 

Henderson ville 

Madison 

Mayodan 

Stoneville 

Granite Falls 

Gibsonville 

Guilford College 

Hamilton 

Harmony 

Sanf ord 

Hickory 

Highlands 

North Wilkesboro 

Ronda 

Elkin 

Mount Airy 

Pilot Mountain 

Booneville ___ 

Huntersville 

Swan Quarter 

Indian Trail 

Leaks ville 

Spray 

St, Pauls 

Kernersville 

Knott's Island 

Lake Lure 

Lattimore 

Thomas ville, R. F. D. 

Liecester 

Lexington 

Liberty 

Lilesville 

Linwood 

Lucama 

Weaver ville, P. O 

Marshall 

Marion 

Marshville 

Matthews 



Telephone and Telegraph Companies 



177 



ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1927— Continued 



Plant Equipment 


Operating 
Revenue 


Operating 
Expenses 


Number of Phones 




and Other Assets 


Business 


Residence 


Miles of Wire 


$ 3,550,00 


$ 500.00 


$ 500.00 




142 

85 

70 

19 

2 

10 

39 

106 

365 


42 


1 , 000 . 00 




20 


100.00 








44 


1,875.00 
600.00 


116.44 
600.00 


391.78 
550.00 


2 


20 
15 


250.00 




10 


1,000.00 
150.00 


485.00 

682.70 

1,500.00 


485.00 
682.70 


1 


26 
70 


15,000.00 


135 


250 
































400 . 00 






1 
100 


7 
161 


6 


28,000.00 


6,692.02 


6,692.02 


20 














13,240.00 

16,924.31 

5,000.00 


40,017.23 

7,564.01 

2,508.00 

3,936.00 

626.23 

43,235.93 

73,837.38 
2,258.50 

60,690.01 


2,545.66 

4,651.75 

2,200.00 

1,080.00 

425.00 

43,419.33 

43,287.07 

1,409.83 

45,798.11 


75 

42 


220 

258 

157 

83 

45 

769 

1,038 

14 

1,267 


93 
98 
50 


3,500.00 

40.00 

75,294.96 

231,465.26 

4,000.00 

154,342.89 


22 

6 

244 

341 

19 
564 


150 

25 

9 

35 

3S 

201 


















































4,000.00 


• 3,000.00 

1,500.00 

4,500.00 

30,114.29 


3,000.00 

1,500.00 

310.00 

19,045.95 




121 
13 
28 

569 


140 


700,00 

150.00 

77,395.49 


5 

6 

180 


35 
33 
22 


3,500.00 

2,100.00 

900.00 

12,578.88 

1,500.00 

400.00 


3,682.20 
2,454.00 
106 . 80 
3,137.39 
1,953.68 


2,682.00 
1,146.55 
75.00 
4,434.10 
1,904.60 


52 
26 
6 
82 
15 


84 

38 

12 

18 

235 

12 

100 

617 

60 

81 

14 

48 

55 


48 
6 
16 
25 
25 
18 


2,000.00 

98,115.31 

6,889.77 

5,000.00 

350.00 


1,500.00 

32,095.63 

6,401.99 

1,500.00 

54.05 

150.00 

4,040.84 


1,500.000 
24,964.03 
4,481.60 
884.00 


7 

254 

32 

19 


125 
1,565 

86 
250 

7 


2,500.00 




7 
56 


50 


4,811.59 


4,405.21 


20 


22,892.93 

5,000.00 

800.00 


15,907.49 
2,000.00 
1,238.13 


16,239.95 

1,560.00 

609 . 50 


218 
40 

7 


276 

140 
38 


185 

200 

25 



178 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

STATISTICS— FOR CALENDAR YEAR 



Name of Company 



Location of Exchange 



Minor Companies — Continued: 

Mebane Home Telephone Co 

Mebane-Ridgeville Telephone Co. 

Merchants Telephone Co 

Mitchell County Telephone Co._. 



Midway Telephone Co. 



Mocksville Telephone Co.. 
Mooresville Telephone Co.. 

Monroe Telephone Co 

Morris Telephone Co 



Morven Telephone Co 

Mountain Retreat Association 

Newell Telephone Co 

Newport- Western Carteret Telephone Co 

Nortn Buncombe Telephone Co 

Norwood Electric Co 

Norfolk-Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Co. 



Onslow Telephone Co 

Orinoco Telephone Co 

Otter Creek Telephone Co. 
Pamlico Telephone Co 



Paw Creek Telephone Co 

Pender Telephone Co 

Pine Bluff Telephone Co 

Pinehurst Telephone Co 

Piney Woods Telephone Co.. 



Pittsylvania- Caswell Telephone Co. 

Pfafftown Telephone Co 

Polk County Telephone Co 



Polkton Telephone Co 

Prospect Telephone Co 

Providence Telephone Co.. 
Randleman Telephone Co. 
Randolph Telephone Co._. 



Reeds Telephone Co 

Richfork Telephone Co 

Roanoke-Chowan Telephone Co. 



Rockridge Telephone Co 

Rockwell Mutual Telephone Co. 

Rocky Creek Telephone Co 

Rocky Hill Telephone Co 



Mebane 

Prospect Hill 

Middlesex 

Burnsville, P. O 

Bakersville 

Winston^Salem, P. O. 

Midway 

Mocksville 

Mooresville 

Monroe 

Roxboro 

Hillsboro 

Morven 

Montreat 

Newell 

Newport 

Weaverville 

Norwood 

Elizabeth City 

Edenton 

Hertford 

Jacksonville 

High Point 

Union Mills, R. F. D. 

Bayboro 

Oriental 

Paw Creek 

Burgaw 

Pine Bluff 

Pinehurst 

Albemarle 

Piney Woods 



Pfafftown 

Tryon 

Landrum, S. C 

Polkton 

High Point, P. O 

Danville, Va. , P. O 

Randleman 

Ramseur 

Asheboro 

Lexington, R. F. D. P. O. 

High Point, P. O 

Woodland 

Conway 

Rich Square 

Roxebel 

Wilson, R. F. D. P. 0._._ 

Rockwell 

Turnersburg 

Walnut Cove, P. O 



Telephone and Telegraph Companies 

ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1927— Continued 



179 









Number of Phones 




Plant Equipment 


Operating 


Operating 






Miles of Wire 


and Other Assets 


Revenue 


Expenses 












Business 


Residence 




$ 14,000.00 


$ 7,512.85 


$ 7,834.56 


70 


135 


100 


500.00 


560.60 


540.00 


7 


86 


93 


3,000.00 


2,500.00 


1,000.00 


55 


80 


25 


2,700.00 


875.25 


858.84 


11 


22 


50 


3 , 500 . 00 


700.00 


675.00 




169 


100 








6,000.00 


7,548.00 


7,482.00 


60 


100 


15 


27,243.33 


14,180.61 


12,089.34 


104 


634 


232 


40,120.03 


30,743.81 


19,888.67 


234 


662 


17 


34,143.90 


17,156.97 


10,816.00 


171 


343 


182 


4,041.00 


3,372.00 


3,068.00 


25 


78 


150 


3,844.63 


1,961.25 


1,525.89 


17 


61 


10 


100.00 


1,280.82 


1,173.27 


3 


45 


30 


2,500.00 


1,142.81 


992.00 


4 


84 


31 


393.49 


1,096.29 
4,547.02 


1,112.70 
2,016.94 


3 
35 




8 


4,884.09 


145 


85 


191,851.12 


89,304.96 


78,610.92 


553 


1,170 


650 


19,790.43 


18,940.69 


12,015.53 


112 


218 


175 


12,917.16 


10,202.11 


5,718.21 


58 


142 


125 


39,186.58 


12,009.47 


12,569.87 


123 


271 


409 


450.00 


180.00 


180.00 




30 


26 


500.00 


250.00 


250.00 


4 


15 


46 


24,000.00 


6,271.32 


1,989.74 


87 


163 


415 


600.00 


740.00 


680.00 


5 


42 


40 


3,500.00 


1,500.00 


800.00 


20 


46 


60 


3,100.00 


2,964.55 


925.00 


10 


51 


46 














452.15 


465.70 


333.55 


3 


66 


25 


1,390.00 


495.00 


500.66 


4 


15 


14 


2,000.00 


1,744.71 


1,744.71 


4 


179 


150 


5,000.00 


12,602.39 


11,139.76 


98 


254 


70 


900.00 


900.00 


500.00 


7 


76 


20 


200 . 00 








16 
10 


4 


450.00 


240.00 


178.03 




90 














7,129.37 


1,931.98 


915.14 


21 


59 


125 


22,159.76 


13,327.74 


7,659.37 


108 


282 


250 


500.00 


585.00 


569 . 25 


3 


127 


11 


1,000.00 










20 


9,295.p0 


11,558.32 


10,422.40 


75 


520 


205 


1,400.00 


1 , 344 . 90 
792.66 


1,344.90 
783.65 




54 
167 


30 


500.00 


13 


1 


400.00 


300.00 
60.00 


300.00 
60.00 




38 
24 


52 


250.00 




15 









180 



N. C. Corporation Commission 

STATISTICS— FOR CALENDAR YEAR 



Name of Company 



Location of Exchange 



Minor Companies — Continued: 

Roseboro Telephone Exchange, Inc.. 

Rose Hill Telephone Co. 

Rural Telephone Co... 



Summerfield Telephone Co 

Salemburg Telephone Co 

Saluda Telephone Co 

Sedgefield Telephone Co 

Seven Parts Telephone Co 

Seagrove Telephone Co 

Sharon Telephone Co 

Sedge Garden Telephone Co 

Shoals Telephone Co 

Southeastern Guilford Telephone Co. 
South Yadkin Telephone Co 



Spring Creek Telephone Co. 
Steele Creek Telephone Co.. 

Seattle Telephone Co 

Thomasville Telephone Co.. 
Troy Telephone Co 



Tulin Telephone Co 

Vanceboro Telephone Co. 

Waxhaw Telephone Co 

Wadesboro Telephone Co 

Wagram Telephone Co 

Walkertown Telephone Co 

Wallace Telephone Co 

Ward Telephone Line 

Weaverville Electric and Telephone Co. 
Western Carolina Telephone Co 



White Telephone Co 

White ville Telephone Co.. 



Wingate Telephone Co 

White Coal Power Co 

Yancey ville Telephone Co. 
Yeopsim Telephone Co 



Total Minor Companies. 
Total Major Companies. 

Grand Total 



Roseboro 

Rose Hill 

Rural Hall 

Clemmons 

Lewisville 

Summerfield 

Salemburg 

Saluda 

Greensboro, P. O 

Bunn, R. F. D 

Seagrove 

Shelby, R. F. D. No. 3— 

Kernersville , P. O 

Shoals 

Greensboro, R. F. D. No. 

HiddeniteP. O 

South Yadkin 

Hot Springs 

Charlotte, R. F. D 

Altamahaw 

Thomasville 

Troy 

Ether 

Mount Gilead 

Candor 

Eagle Spring 

West End 

Concord, P. O 

Vanceboro 

Waxhaw 

Wadesboro 

Wagram 

Walkerton 

Wallace 

Battleboro 

Weaverville 

Franklin 

Bryson City. _ 

Sylva 

Belvidere 

Vineland, P. O 

Whiteville 

Mount Tabor... 

Chadbourn 

Wingate 

Old Fort 

Yancey ville 

Edenton, P. O 



Telephone and Telegraph Companies 

ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1927— Continued 



181 



Plant Equipment 


Operating 
Revenue 


Operating 
Expenses 


Number of Phones 




and Other Assets 


Business 


Residence 


Miles of Wire 


$ 5,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,000.00 


$ 1,200.00 

800.00 

3,259.71 


$ 1,000.00 

750.00 

2,730.52 


25 

6 

14 


17 
44 
98 


50 

30 

126 














4,500.00 

1,500.00 

1,800.00 

100.00 


2,340.00 
1,300.00 
1,825.99 


2,355.34 

1,150.00 

2,369.23 

48.00 

500.00 

240.00 

302.00 

250.00 


13 
12 
15 


77 
59 
38 
6 
42 
75 
25 

175 
10 

140 
97 


54 

75 

30 

4 


12,500.00 


13,800.00 
240.00 
305.00 
250.00 




20 


300 . 00 




75 


300 . 00 




20 


1,500.00 




1,000 






10 


500 . 00 


15.00 
859.98 


15.00 
859.98 




300 


600 . 00 




72 








800.00 
500.00 


585.86 
1,100.00 

620.00 
24,067.39 
24,461.20 


420.00 

527.00 

720.00 

18,926.15 

21,430.84 


10 


12 

55 

95 

411 

376 


5 

85 


400.00 
66,584.37 
27,523.25 


3 
195 
174 


8 
415 
103 


















































600.00 


400.00 


400.00 




65 


30 








4,000.00 

26,530.19 

7,500.00 

200.00 


1,539.00 

16,387.85 

1,200.00 

60.00 

5,231.25 

850.00 

8,349.80 

14,870.01 


1,820.00 

11,532.52 

600.00 

12.00 

3,699.82 

700.00 

9,413.73 

12,968.47 


27 

150 

22 


46 
336 

14 

7 

139 

12 
190 
341 


33 

140 

200 

6 


3,984.00 

700.00 

6,278.28 

26,030.00 


46 

6 

35 

185 


85 

10 

100 

223 














1,000.00 
20,461.00 


500.00 
13,574.62 


400.00 
9,698.90 


2 
161 


20 
226 


25 
102 


























2,000.00 

2,000.00 

500.00 

750.00 


1,342.67 

1,605.40 

905.30 

496.45 


860.00 
920.00 
916.43 
357 . 50 


17 

29 

2 


86 
18 
21 
24 


75 
10 
20 
14 








18,984,322 37 


7,298,001.28 


4,894,281.51 


47,352 


71,260 








$ 20,814,068 58 


$ 8,292,556.01 


$ 5,669,033.23 


$ 55,094 


$ 94,832 









182 



Telephone and Telegraph Companies 



AMOUNT EXPENDED FOR EXTENSION— 1927 



Carolina $ 283,468.98 

Interstate 23,787.32 

North State 47,555.10 

Bell 2,490,466.62 



Total $2,845,278.02 



Harmony 

Heims 

Hickory 

Highlands.-. 

Horton 

Hunters ville. 
Hyde Co 



1,294.96 
18,050.87 



22,815.15 





2,145.10 




25.00 


Andrews 


International 


5,636.55 


Ansonville 




Johnson 






1,636.31 


Kenansville 

Knotts Island 


906.00 


Aurora 






20.00 
61.20 




1,324.54 


Bethlehem 


Lattimore 


650.00 


Beulaville 


400.00 


Lee 












Bonlee 




Lexington 


4,966.63 


Brown Summit. 




Liberty. . . 


100.00 


Carthage . . 




Lilesville 




Camden 




Lin wood 


28.00 


Cane Creek 




Lucama 




Cane Creek.. _ 




Madison 


824.77 


Coastal 


339.89 


Marion 


2,218.80 


Catawba 




Marsh ville.. 




Cardenas 




Matthews 


















Chapel Hill 






1,518.39 




2,299.29 




200.00 


City. 




Midway 


25.00 








250.00 


Cliff side. 




Mooresville 


435.57 


Cahoon 


3,000.00 


Monroe 


1,120.00 


Concord 




Morris 


522.55 










Cullowhle.. 


Mountain Retreat 


400.00 


Davidson 


175.00 


Newell — 


200.00 


















Duplin.. 


Norwood 




Eagle Springs. _ 




Norf.-Car 


28,135.32 


















Eastern.. 




Otter Creek 




Ellenboro 


300.00 


Pamlico 




Ellerbee.. 




Paw Creek — 


15.00 


Ether Rural __ . ._ 




Pender. - 


750.00 


Fairview 




Pinebluff.. 


250.00 


Fairmont Silver Hill 




Pinehurst 


1,494.72 








202.15 


Farmers 




Pittsylvania-Caswell ... 












Forest City-Ruthf ord 




Polk County 

Polkton. _ 


500.00 










7,500.00 






Fruitland 


175.00 


Providence 




Fisher .. 


20,000.00 


Randleman 




Granite 


416.02 


Randolph 


2,430.19 




585.92 
500.00 
500.00 


-p j 










Hamilton 


Roanoke-Chowan 





N. C. Corporation Commission 



183 



Rockridge 

Rockwell 

Rocky Creek. .. 

Rock Hill 

Roseboro 

Rose Hill 

Rural 

Summerfield 

Salemburg 

Saluda 

Sedgefield 

Seven Paths 

Seagrove 

Sharon 

Sedge Garden __ 

Shoals 

So. E. Guilford. 
South Yadkin _ 

Spring Creek 

Still Creek 

Thomasville 

Troy 



AMOUNT EXPENDED FOR EXTENSION 
(Continued) 



1927 



7 5.00 



1,000.00 



694.76 
2,00.00 



240.00 



217.13 
135.86 



27.80 
5,437.74 



Tulin 

Vanceboro 

Waxhaw 

Wadesboro 

Wagram 

Walkerton 

Wallace 

Ward 

Weaverville 

Western Carolina, 

White 

White ville 

Wingate 

White Coal 

Yancey ville 

Yeopim 



400.00 



232.27 
12.00 



1,016.62 
6,562.37 



1,673.59 
250.00 



$ 157,440.35 
2,845,278.02 

$3,002,718.37 



GENERAL INDEX 

PART I 
Claims and Complaints— page 

Bus Companies 104 

Claims 100 

Electric Light and Power Companies 66 

Express Companies 79 

Railroad Companies 28 

Telegraph Companies ,.— : 74 

Telephone Companies 80 

Corporation Commission, Personnel - 2 

Decisions (see Orders) 
Freight Traffic — 

Combination Rates, Rules 169 

Demurrage, Car 153 

Distance Table Rules , 169 

Exception Sheets, North Carolina 139 

Group Designation of Carriers 170 

Rates : 

Class, Single, line 171 

Class, Joint line 173 

Commodities : 

Articles in Uniform Brick List 174 

Cement 176 

Clay Gravel 178 

Coal and Coke 178 

Concrete blocks, without ornamental face 194 

Cotton 179 

Cotton 180 

Cottonseed 181 

Cottonseed Hulls 181 

Crushed Stone 193 

Curbing, Stone 191 

Chert - 193 

Cinders 193 

Granite 191-193 

Gravel ( washed ) 193 

Lime .182 

Live stock 184 

Logs ( Long lines ) 186 

Logs ( Short lines) 187 

Marble 191-193 

Molasses 188 

Paving blocks 191 

Petroleum 189 

Stone, Artificial Building 195 

Stone, marble, granite, viz : Curbing or paving blocks ; building ; 
dimension or random ; rough quarried or dressed 191 



186 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Freight Traffic — Continued page 

Tile, concrete building 190 

Wood, fire 197 

Storage 161 

Switching 166 

Letter of Transmittal 3 

Motor Vehicles, List of. 132 

Orders — 

Electric Light and Power : 
Rates : 

Airway landing fields 68 

Brevard Light and Power Co 70 

Gas: 
Rates : 

Concord and Kannapolis .....68 

Elizabeth City, Henderson & Oxford 68 

Gastonia 67 

Motor Vehicles : 

Agents, soliciting at bus stations ...129 

Complaint of service : 

Tuckaseegee Bus Line 108 

Extension of line : 

Seashore Transportation Co 109 

Exceptions overruled 131 

Franchise certificate cancellation : 

J. W. Blevins 104 

W. B. Blades 104 

Part route Carolina Coach Co 108 

Franchise certificate denied : 

J. Marion Washam 110 

Bristol-Asheville Bus Co ....130 

Franchise certificate granted : 

Motor Transportation Co. of the South 104 

Insurance, passenger liabilitiy and property damage Ill 

Insurance, passenger, endorsement 127 

Same, amendment 128 

Petition — 

To operate passenger busses : 

Motor Transportation Co. of the South 107 

Transportation Committee of the N. C. Commission on Interracial 

co-operation 130 

Rules and regulations 112 

Union Bus Stations : 

Amending Commission's order 128 

Leased for station property 131 

Railroads : 

Agency, discontinued : 

Addor 61 

Hasty 63 



General Index 187 

Orders — Continued page 

Kerr 58 

Manchester 63 

Parkersburg 62 

Shannon 62 

Carload Minimum : 

Fertilizer 23 

Classification : 

Agricultural implements 59 

Exceptions : 

Union depot, Raleigh 55 

Same 56 

Overcharge : 

Hollow building tile 57 

Limited Common Carrier : 

New Holland Corporation 41 

Rates : 

Coal from Cumnock 59 

Crates — Fruit or berry 38 

Empty truck barrels 35 

Fertilizer, scale 23 

Gasoline, Wilmington to Snow Hill 34 

Oyster Shells, ground, scale 50 

Peaches 45 

Steel bar sash 46 

Stone, artificial building, scale 35 

Marble, granite or stone (crushed or rubble) stone screenings, grav- 
el (washed) slag, chert, cinders and scale 43 

Station : 

Location change, Asheville 41 

Location change, Spencer and E. Spencer 46 

Union depot, Raleigh 55 

Trains, passenger, discontinued : 

A. & Y. Railway 47 

Telegraph : 
Rates : 

Western Union Telegraph Co 74 

Telephones : 

Line Mileage changes 80 

Petition for service : 

Dr. Newberry, Warsaw 83 

Purchase : 

Watauga T & T. Co. by So. Bell... 87 

Rates : 

Ahoskie 82 

Boone 88 

Brevard, seasonal 93 

Chapel Hill 88 

Franklinville 83 



188 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Orders — Continued page 

Franklinton 90 

Grover ...94 

Hendersonville, seasonal 86 

Hickory 89 

Mocksville 91 

Mt. Airy 86 

Murfreesboro 90 

Norlina 90 

Plymouth 90 

St. Pauls .97 

Sedgefield .. 84 

Siler City ". 92 

Snow Camp 93 

Snow Hill 90 

Stoneville 96 

Walnut Cove '. 92 

Warsaw 83 

Waynesville, seasonal 85 

Williamston 81 

Windsor 91 

Rural multiparty service : 

Southern Bell T. & T. Co , 82 

Same 95 

Street Railways : 
Rates, school children, Raleigh 66 

PART II 

Electric Light and Power Companies (large) : 

Reports : 

Blue Ridge Power Co 107 

Broad River Power Co 108 

Carolina Power and Light Co 109 

Carolina Gas and Electric Co 118 

Duke Power Co 122 

Durham Public Service Co 124 

Melrose Power and Manufacturing Co 137 

N. C. Public Service Co - 140 

Southern Power Co ...i 144 

Southern Public Utilities Co 146 

Tide Water Power Co 152 

Virginia Electric and Power Co 155 

Statistics : 

Energy produced - 163 

Electric Light and Power Companies (small) : 

Reports, listed alphabetically 161 

Statistics 161 



General Index 189 

Express Companies : page 

Reports : 

American Railway Express Co 96 

Southeastern Express Co 99 

Gas, Companies Furnishing: 
Reports : 

Carolina Power and Light Co 109 

Concord and Kannapolis Gas Co 120 

Elizabeth and Suburban Gas Co 126 

Fayetteville Light and Power Co 128 

Gastonia and Suburban Gas Co.— , 130 

Goldsboro Gas Co 132 

Greenville Gas Co 133 

Henderson and Oxford Gas Co 135 

Kinston Gas Co 134 

New Bern Gas and Fuel Co 139 

N. C. Public Service Co 140 

Southern Gas Improvement Co 142 

Southern Public Utilities Co 146 

Tide Water Power Co 152 

Washington Gas Co 158 

Winston-Salem Gas Co 159 

Statistics : 

Gas produced 165 

Pullman Company : 

Report of 102 

Railroads : 
Reports : 

Aberdeen & Rockfish Railroad Co 45 

Appalachian Railway Co 46 

Asheville & Craggy Mt Railway Co 23 

Asheville Southern Railway Co 24 

Atlanta and Charlotte, Air Line Railway Co 25 

Atlantic Coast Line & Railroad Co 3 

Atlantic & Carolina Railroad Co 47 

Atlantic and Danville Railway Co 26 

Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad Co 13 

Atlantic and Western Railroad Co 48-49 

Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Co 40 

Black Mountain Railway Co 50 

Bonlee and Western Railroad Co 51 

Carolina Railroad Co 52 

Carolina and Georgia Railway Co 53 

Carolina and Northeastern Railroad Co 54 

Carolina and Northwestern Railway Co 7 

Carolina and Tennessee Southern Railway Co 27 

Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway Co 5 

Carolina Southern Railroad Co 55 

Cliffside Railroad Co 56 



190 N. C. Corporation Commission 

Railroads — Continued page 

Danville and Western Railway Co 28 

Dover and Southbound Railroad Co 57 

Durham and Southern Railway Co 58 

East Carolina Railway..... 60 

East Tennessee and W. North Carolina Railroad Co 62 

Elkin and Alleghany Railroad Co 64 

Graham County Railroad Co 65 

High Point, Randleman, Ashboro and Southern Railroad 30 

High Point, Thomasville and Denton Railroad Co 66 

Kingston Carolina Railroad Co 67 

Laurinburg and Southern Railroad Co 68 

Lawndale Railway and Industrial Co 69 

Linville River Railway Co 70 

Louisville and Nashville Railroad Co 71 

Maxton, Alma and Southbound Railroad Co 74 

Moore Central Railway Co 75 

North Carolina Railroad Co 32 

North Carolina Midland Railroad Co 34 

North and South Carolina Railroad Co 31 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Co 10 

Norfolk and Western Railway Co 14 

Piedmont and Northern Railway Co 76 

Pidgeon River Railway Co 79 

Raleigh and Charleston Railroad Co 80 

Rockingham Railroad Co ...82 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Co 17 

Smoky Mt. Railway Co 83 

Southern Railway Co 20 

Southern Railway Co. — Carolina Div 35 

State University Railroad Co 37 

Tallulah Falls Railway Co 41 

Tennessee and N. C. Railroad Co 84 

Townsville Railroad Co 86 

Tuckaseegee and Southeastern Ry. Co 87 

Virginia and Carolina Southern Railroad Co 88 

Warrenton Railroad Co 89 

Washington & Vandemere R. R. Co 90 

Wilmington, Brunswick and Southern Railroad Co 91 

Winston-Salem Southbound Railway 43 

Yadkin Railroad Co 38 

Statistics (recapitulation) : 

Capital stock 92 

Equipment, cost of 92 

Expenses, operating 92 

Funded debt 92 

Miles road 92 

Revenue, operating 92 

Revenue, freight 92 

Revenue, passenger train service 92 



General Index 191 

Telegraph Companies : page 

Report of: 

Postal Telegraph Cable Co 103 

Western Union Telegraph Co 105 

Telephone Companies : 

Reports, listed alphabetically 168 

Statistics : 

Value plant 168 

Operating Revenue 168 

Operating expenses ... ., 168 

Number phones 168 

Street Railways, Companies Operating : 

Carolina Power and Light Co 109 

Durham Public Service Co 124 

New Bern Ghent St. Railway Co 138 

N. C. Public Service Co 140 

Southern Public Utilities Co 146 

Tide Water Power Co 152 

Statistics 166 

Water Transportation Companies : 

Alphabetically listed 95 

Statistics : 

Gross receipts 95 

Gross expenses 95 

Length of route 95 

Value of vessels 95 



ST ™ffiLS, N0RT H CAROLINA 




3 3091 00773 2431 



HECKMAN 

BINDERY INC. 

MAR 93 

N. MANCHESTER, 
INDIANA 46962